As a GTA Nursing Grad or Student. Did you make the right choice?

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    Like many in the past or currenlty (i'm assuming), i'm having an internal dilemma of whether or not to pursue nursing. I have applied recently to uoft's accelerated nursing program and hope to get in...but even if I do the i'm unsure of whether or not nursing is the right choice. While this is obviously highly subjective- to the students and recent grads out there -what are your thoughts? did you make the right choice or have you come to regret it in some way? what have your experiences been with nursing in a hospital and as a student?

    Thanks
    Joe V likes this.
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  4. 10 Comments so far...

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    Lots of work; busy; constant demand for accuracy, attentiveness, and good documentation. It's a steep learning curve for those with no background in anything health/medical/physiology related. You get lots of body substances (of every colour, consistency, and smell) and sick people. The hours are anything but normal unless you have some kind of clinic job or are a school nurse. On the other hand, this means you don't have to contend with traffic hour!

    Some days your patients will make you want to bang your head against the wall. And on other days you'll wonder why you ever considered doing anything else...like the mornings you enter your patient's room to, "Oh, I'm so glad you're here!"

    I don't think it's possible to really know what it's like until you try it. Maybe start as an LPN (RPN in ON) and see if it's for you? That's what I suggest to people who are thinking of going into nursing. It's shorter and cheaper and we do virtually the same things as RNs (at least in AB). If you really hate it you at least didn't invest a lot of your life into it!

    Think about why you're considering nursing and what attracts you. That might help you make your decision.
    loriangel14 and Fiona59 like this.
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    I'm a second career nurse, and I knew I was making the right choice going in. I thought about this for almost two years before investing the time and money. There are various factors to consider. What areas of nursing interest you? Are you willing to work anywhere to start out? Are you willing to work shifts and weekends? Can you handle stress? Everyone is different. I don't regret my decision.
    loriangel14 and Fiona59 like this.
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    I'm a hospital nurse. Always will be. I usually enjoy it.

    But looking back, I'd have gone into Health Records Managment if I'd known it existed as a course of study. Better hours, no families, no bodily fluids on new shoes (it always happens!), get all your breaks, and pretty good money.

    What is making you consider nursing? It can't be the great working conditions, wonderful hours, and scores of available jobs can it?

    If you are doing it for the "great paycheque and flexible hours" it isn't the right job for you.
    joanna73 and loriangel14 like this.
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    I am an RPN in Ontario and I truly believe that going to nursing school is the best thing I ever did. I didn't get there until I was 38 but I had wanted to do it for years. I chose the RPN program because it was offered part time at a campus close to me.Night classes were the best because they enabled me to keep working. As a single parent that was the main concern. I don't regret not being an RN.I never enjoyed writing endless papers in school and I have no desire to be in charge.I work in a hospital and I love my job.In spite of sore feet,difficult families,clueless managers and as the others mentioned, as close up view of every bodily fluid you can think of.
    Fiona59 and joanna73 like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from joanna73
    I'm a second career nurse, and I knew I was making the right choice going in. I thought about this for almost two years before investing the time and money. There are various factors to consider. What areas of nursing interest you? Are you willing to work anywhere to start out? Are you willing to work shifts and weekends? Can you handle stress? Everyone is different. I don't regret my decision.
    That's great, that's similar to the situation I am currently in. I have a career now but the jobs are so scarce right now, and there's too high of a surplus in people like me (teacher). I originally was going to be a nurse and now that I have had three years to really think through my decision and save up some money to go back to school, I think I'm making the right choice for my long term future.
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    Good for you, provided you realize jobs are scarce in nursing also. You should be able to find something casual or part time, but be prepared to start anywhere. Who knows? Hopefully, nursing employment will improve in the next couple of years. Learn as much as you can at school.
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    well the main reason I want to be a nurse is because I like the idea of being able to do something important and make a good salary at the same time. i also like the fact that there's so much variety within the nursing profession and that through obtaining additional education like a masters degree there is so much upward mobility (policy, administration, teaching, research etc.) however, not having actually experienced or seen any of this for myself I realize that these may be romanticized notions of what nursing is or could be.

    Also, the idea of starting out "anywhere" doesnt sit well with me which I know will be a problem, but I can't shake it. I either want to work in community health nursing or emergency/trauma nursing (vastly different I know, which really just again attests to my confusion)
    Last edit by tashap18 on Apr 6, '12
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    Many people start off with romanticized notions of where they want to work.They usually get their eyes opened when they start clinicals.Just getting a job will be an achievement,never mind getting one in the area you want.
    Fiona59 and joanna73 like this.
  13. 1
    New grads don't have nursing experience. The economy has been poor for experienced and new grads for 4 years. Until things improve, specialty areas require 1-2 years nursing experience. You will need to be flexible and be prepared to start anywhere. If you get that specialty, great. It usually doesn't happen right away. There are many applicants to choose from.
    Fiona59 likes this.


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