CRNE in oct - page 8

by ellamae28

11,320 Unique Views | 75 Comments

Hello! just wondering if anyone who took the exam last oct heard news when are they releasing the exam. It is almost 6 weeks and i'm getting nervous about the thing. :o sometimes i just try to forget it. :uhoh3:... Read More


  1. 0
    Hi, Alberta is way [much] stricter than Saskatchewan!

    I have batchmates who have the same credentials as I do who applied there in Saskatchewan and they were permitted to work as grad nurses: no bridging, no courses.

    I applied here in Alberta and was subjected to take 2 courses before I became a grad nurse. We have another batchmate, applied here in Alberta and became an LPN and not as a grad nurse... She will be undergoing the same process as I did to become a grad nurse soon... She somehow regrets it saying, "If only I applied in Saskatchewan like the rest of our batchmates, I would have been an grad nurse now too..."
  2. 0
    hi nurses/Neiruth/Annie/chinky/serene_ieg,

    I am a new member. I am a new RN in the Philippines.I took the PNLE last june 2008. I want to take the CNRE. please, i have a lot of questions:

    1. I am researching on what state is faster 2b a RN in canada?

    2. Some say some states( like alberta, Saskatchewan) do not require nursing programs and schooling before they take the CNRE. ( just like what happened to azrael527-that what he/she posted) . Is this true? what are the advantages and diadvantages in terms of salary, rate of application for registration, etc. compared to states requiring nursing programs and schooling before they taking the CNRE

    thanks:heartbeat
  3. 0
    Quote from sweet_Essence
    hi nurses/Neiruth/Annie/chinky/serene_ieg,

    I am a new member. I am a new RN in the Philippines.I took the PNLE last june 2008. I want to take the CNRE. please, i have a lot of questions:

    1. I am researching on what state is faster 2b a RN in canada?

    2. Some say some states( like alberta, Saskatchewan) do not require nursing programs and schooling before they take the CNRE. ( just like what happened to azrael527-that what he/she posted) . Is this true? what are the advantages and diadvantages in terms of salary, rate of application for registration, etc. compared to states requiring nursing programs and schooling before they taking the CNRE

    thanks:heartbeat
    Any questions regarding licensing in a province and questions regarding immigration to Canada please post in the International forum.

    There are a few threads already discussing salary in the Canadian forum plus a few discussing Canada in the International forum. Can be done on your own without an agency
  4. 1
    Can we please bring this thread back on topic? The thread is about the Canadian Registered Nurse Examination. It's not about IELTS, it's not about educational standards for IENs, it's not about which province is better than another (sweet_Essence, Canada does not have states!) and it's not about anything related to immigration in any way. While we're on the subject, may I ask that we stay on topic on every thread, and if we feel the need to discuss things that are off-topic, we start a new thread in the appropriate forum? Too many threads on the Canadian Forum have been derailed lately and it must be addressed. Thank you!
    RGN1 likes this.
  5. 2
    The CRNE does not test 5 subjects it tests competencies.

    All the competencies are listed on the CRNE website.

    Entry level competencies have been identified and this is what the exam is based on.

    Internationally educated nurses fail the exam at 5 - 10 times the Canadian educated nurses fail rate.

    There may be many reasons for that statistic but we have very little hard data that tells us why this is so.

    As an educator of internationally educated nurses preparing to become a nurse in Canada here is my best guess:

    -Community health nursing is an entry level competency in Canada. Community health nursing means have a community as your client this is NOT the same as delivery of patient care to an individual in a community setting.

    -language - even if you have good literacy in English there may still be some language difficulties in interpreting what is meant by the question. My experience is that some language difficulties have to do with vocabulary and cause and effect sentences which consistently confound my students.

    -lack of familiarity with the role of the nurse here in Canada. Nurses are autonomous, independent practitioners. There are no doctors working in the hospitals, doctors work in the community. Not understanding how the health care system is set up will make selecting the correct answers more difficult.

    -poorly developed critical thinking skills. If your basic education as a child and as a nurse focused on rote learning and memorization you may have difficulty with the level of thinking and reasoning that is required on the majority of questions on the CRNE. Nurses here are expected to proceed with a sense of critical inquiry in their work and if you have never been encouraged to do that those skills may not be well developed.

    that's my best guess! Fortunately many internationally educated nurses DO pass the CRNE .

    We have a tremendous shortage of nurses here and they are needed.
    RGN1 and janfrn like this.
  6. 0
    Here in Calgary we do have doctors that work exclusively in the hospitals, & in hospital only based clinics ("hospitalists" as they seem to be being termed.)

    Not that that fact makes any real difference to your comments about the exam itself because they are totally corrrect but thought I'd just let you know that some Provinces do have, or are introducing, hospital based doctors.

    Another possible reason for the higher failure rate among IENs is that outside North America "multiple guess" as an exam format is less common (although it's gaining in popularity I guess as computers take over more & more) so a lot of us were not brought up with that format as the norm.

    Lucky enough I got in the passing stats but having English as my 1st language (OK pretty much only language) helped. I truly take my hat off to nurses who pass that exam when English (or French if they took that version) is not their native language. Some of the questions were ambiguous to say the least & that's from a native English speaker!

    Personally my biggest beef about the exam was that it really didn't prove I'm a safe to practice nurse at all. It was way too "psyche-social." If I was a patient I would want to know that my nurse was able to spot problems quickly & deal with them. I wouldn't care if they knew how to "talk" to me. Having said that I'm very impressed with the Canadian schooled nurses I'm wokring with, so despite the exam they are good. I just wonder how many good nurses are not working because they couoldn't pass an exam that doesn't even test those all important critical thinking skills at all!
    Last edit by RGN1 on Dec 3, '08


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