BSN vs. RN Salary | allnurses

BSN vs. RN Salary

  1. 0 Hi! I got a lot of information about RN salaries from another thread. What it seems to be, is that around the Bham area, starting salaries are at about $18/hr. My question is, to any of you that know, or any of you that are Bachelors' grads, what is the difference in the pay? I have heard that Associates & Bachelors' pay are about the same. Do any of you know if this is true? (It seems that if "they" want BSN grads so bad that they would pay more per hour for a BSN than an Associates). Thanks for any info you have.
  2. Visit  busylizzy profile page

    About busylizzy

    From 'Alabama'; Joined Jan '06; Posts: 32.

    67 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  jessica profile page
    0
    Where I work there is no difference in pay for an ADN and BSN prepared nurse. Both hold the same title RN. I chose to get my BSN because I knew that I would not stop my education once I received my license. The only place that I know of that pays more for a BSN prepared nurse is the V.A.
  4. Visit  suzanne4 profile page
    1
    Pay is usually about the same, you take the same RN licensing exam. You have just a faster time of progressing on to management, if you want that.
    Jessy_RN likes this.
  5. Visit  sosiouxme profile page
    0
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.
  6. Visit  09RN profile page
    1
    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.
    I disagree. Though I do belive that with a master's degree you can do more things and make more money. But you can also go from your ADN to a bridge program either getting a BSN or master's and you can be working at a hospital as a RN and some hospital will even pay for that bridge. There is such a shortage for nurses right now that there is lots of opportunities out there. I have also been told that ALL new nurses get paid the same regardless ADN or BSN.
    MichealB/RN2B likes this.
  7. Visit  melsman1904 profile page
    8
    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree)

    Ummm, where did you get that idea from?
    Jessy_RN, Sweet charm, PurpleLVN, and 5 others like this.
  8. Visit  Snickett profile page
    7
    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.
    An "Associate's Degree of Nursing" is a college degree. I gon't know of any organization that will hire a BSN into a "higher position" to "begin with".....sorry to disappoint, but every nurse will staet out as a Staff RN.
    PurpleLVN, Dazglue, gingerpeachee, and 4 others like this.
  9. Visit  sunshine0808 profile page
    1
    No where I have been has paid more than .50 (cents) on the hour more for a BS.
    Jessy_RN likes this.
  10. Visit  sunshine0808 profile page
    2
    I totally agree here. I have held higher positions with an ADN (College Degree!!!) than a lot of my friends who have BSN
    Jessy_RN and Dazglue like this.
  11. Visit  readyforsuccess99 profile page
    12
    Ummm, open up your FUNDAMENTALS BOOK... This was actually on our test..... A person who graduates with an "Associate's Degree" in Registered Nursing IS a REGISTERED NURSE. Guess what? A person who graduates with a "Bachelor's Degree" in Registered Nursing IS a REGISTERED NURSE. SO THEY ARE BOTH RN's. It's simply that the type of DEGREE is different in that if you want to pursue other areas: master's degree, teaching, PA, whatever, you must have your Bachelor's Degree to acquire that. There is typically no difference in pay, AND an Associate's Degree R.N. can be a charge nurse just like someone that holds a Bachelor's Degree. And as far as BSN's getting hired over ADN's, rumor. You both obtained the same skills and had to take the same boards...ugh that just made me mad.... this forum is to help one another, not bring others down. If an Associate's Degree is not "a real degree" why does every college all over the world SAY IT IS...okay, i'm off my soap box..
    RN1488, PurpleLVN, tae26, and 9 others like this.
  12. Visit  Kookubear profile page
    0
    Quote from readyforsuccess99
    Ummm, open up your FUNDAMENTALS BOOK... This was actually on our test..... A person who graduates with an "Associate's Degree" in Registered Nursing IS a REGISTERED NURSE. Guess what? A person who graduates with a "Bachelor's Degree" in Registered Nursing IS a REGISTERED NURSE. SO THEY ARE BOTH RN's. It's simply that the type of DEGREE is different in that if you want to pursue other areas: master's degree, teaching, PA, whatever, you must have your Bachelor's Degree to acquire that. There is typically no difference in pay, AND an Associate's Degree R.N. can be a charge nurse just like someone that holds a Bachelor's Degree. And as far as BSN's getting hired over ADN's, rumor. You both obtained the same skills and had to take the same boards...ugh that just made me mad.... this forum is to help one another, not bring others down. If an Associate's Degree is not "a real degree" why does every college all over the world SAY IT IS...okay, i'm off my soap box..
    Actually, the title RN refers to registered nurse. You do not graduate in registered nursing. You graduate either with a BSN, an ADN or with a diploma in nursing and then have to take your boards. Only once you successfully pass the NCLEX are you an RN.

    Except at the VA, all new grads are hired in hospitals at Staff I positions, regardless of degree and do the same work, therefore earn the same pay. It is when you want to go into management that the degree becomes more important. And charge nurse is not managment. Nursing manager or administration is. And most of those are going to require or at least prefer MSN prepared nurses. And you can go into an MSN, depending on the program, with either an ADN or BSN. The ADN to MSN will just usually take a little longer. If you want to go in community or HH, you need a BSN at this point. Yes, there are HH with 2yr, but they have experience and will be grandfathered in. New grads need BSNs for that.

    What hospitals hire is the best candidate for the job. Now if you have two people who have the same skill set, interview well and are a good fit, the BSN will usually get the job simply because it is a higher degree. But obviously if someone with an ADN is a better fit for the unit than the BSN, the ADN will get the job.

    However, the future of nursing is changing. Many nurse practioner programs are starting to change it from a masters level to a DNP level. And I have been told by nurse managers (who do the hiring) at 2 difference hospitals, that the shift has already started towards solely BSN trained staff, although again, existing ADNs will be grandfathered in.
  13. Visit  BabyCatchr profile page
    0
    Maybe you are thinking of a diploma nurse who graduates from a hospital program and not a college? That nurse would get an RN or an LVN but would not have a BSN OR ADN degree.

    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.
  14. Visit  hopefulnurse84 profile page
    0
    it's not true that an ADN is not considered a college degree. the words "ASSOCIATE DEGREE OF NURSING". a RN nursing certificate is not considered a college degree


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