Please Explain "Agency Nursing" to me. Thanks!

  1. Hi all,



    Hope everyone is doing well today.



    Can someone please explain AGENCY NURSING to me? Pros/Cons (someone on another thread said they get paid 3x what a staff nurse gets).



    Is work hard to come by? Do people do it for the flexibility? DO you generally get long term gigs or is it generally a shift here, a shift there.



    Anything else would be helpful too! Many thanks!!
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   purplemania
    I have not worked for an agency, but we hire them. They generally get 13 week contracts, but some can be prn and are paid more per hour than the regular staff, but do not have any benefits. Agencies may provide insurance and other benefits. Some agency nurses have worked here, in various depts., for years. Evidently they get benefits thru spouse's employer or thru agency. Anyway, they do the same work as other nurses in that dept. An agency nurse is expected to be able to work independently.
  4. by   nycNurse2b
    Quote from purplemania
    I have not worked for an agency, but we hire them. They generally get 13 week contracts, but some can be prn and are paid more per hour than the regular staff, but do not have any benefits. Agencies may provide insurance and other benefits. Some agency nurses have worked here, in various depts., for years. Evidently they get benefits thru spouse's employer or thru agency. Anyway, they do the same work as other nurses in that dept. An agency nurse is expected to be able to work independently.
    In your opinion, and in the opinion of your co-workers - - are agency nurses equals to staff RN's? Or are they viewed differently and possibly even in a negative light since they show up, work and then in a few weeks move on?

    Just wondering. Seems like a good gig if you need some flexibility (i.e. if you have kids) and have a husband who can cover you on his work's insurance plan.

    Many thanks again for the response.
  5. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from nycNurse2b
    In your opinion, and in the opinion of your co-workers - - are agency nurses equals to staff RN's? Or are they viewed differently and possibly even in a negative light since they show up, work and then in a few weeks move on?

    Just wondering. Seems like a good gig if you need some flexibility (i.e. if you have kids) and have a husband who can cover you on his work's insurance plan.

    Many thanks again for the response.
    A warm body is a warm body most places. If you've got a pulse and a license you're pretty much equal. By the way, for the most part - agency nurses will do better than staff RN's but I can't say that I regularly (or even rarely) see them making 3x as much. That would be like $60/hr (on the average). If there were $60/hr positions at most local or travel nursing agencies - 1) there would be no staff nurses, and 2) there wouldn't be nearly as many people on this board complaining about the crappy pay.
    This is not to say that the hospital is not billed for 3x what a staff nurse would be paid, but that is a different thread.
  6. by   IamRN
    Quote from nycNurse2b
    In your opinion, and in the opinion of your co-workers - - are agency nurses equals to staff RN's? Or are they viewed differently and possibly even in a negative light since they show up, work and then in a few weeks move on?
    There are good agency nurses as many times over as there are staff nurses; of course, the inverse is just as true.

    Most often than not staff will be grateful to have the extra help. Not all agency nurses move on in a few weeks, some move after one shift. That is, not all agencies contract for long periods of time, you can work a shift here, a shift there as part of working through an agency. When I worked agency, it wasn't uncommon for me to work in three or four different facilities in one week. I liked it that way....no involvement in unit politics; just went in, did my work, and went home after my shift ended.

    I don't think that agency nurses have to work any more independently than any other nurse, but one does have to have the ability to aclimate to different working situations/conditions and be resourceful.

    Work can be spradic so relying on agency for primary income may not be right for everyone. The flexibility is awesome! Generally you get to choose which hospitals, units, and shifts you are willing to work.
  7. by   pednurse74
    but, not home health agency. My boyfriends brother's girlfriend works at an agency, but I havent been able to talk to her because she lives in another state and we dont have LD. Anywy, where can I find an agency in Indiana? I hear they get to go to diff places all the time, that would be very nice for me since I get bored in one spot easily. I need all the info I can get. TY:hatparty:
  8. by   pednurse74
    without being hired in an agency/facility? The reason I am asking is because, I have been outta work for 5 months now. My moms friend is doing caretaking unlicensed in people's homes and recieves pay for that, use to be a CNA years ago.... I was curious since I am licensed, if I could put an ad in the paper stating that I am looking for work to take care of someone in their home without going through home health, I have worked at a HH before and was promised 40-60 hr/wk and got 45 the first week and then it dropped down to 20 because other nurses were needing positions too and then it completely dropped down to 6! I was wanting to put my own hours in as much as possible knowing that I can work when the patient needs me, etc.....is this legal?
  9. by   mscsrjhm
    I have taken care of people at their home, receiving money from their family for the care. As they were very wealthy, I took no cut in pay. (correction...very, very, very wealthy.) I also provided ONLY routine daily living care. Family gave all medications. (very loving & involved families-they just needed assistance with hands on care)
    However, jobs like that don't come around often. Once in a blue moon. I have only had two in 23 years. And...I grabbed them. Neither lasted long due to patient's condition.
    It would be interesting to get others opinions regarding liability for contracting yourself. As long as you are working directly under a Physician, I would think it would be legal??
    Last edit by mscsrjhm on Sep 23, '04 : Reason: forgot sumpin'

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