Jump to content

Your thoughts?

Posted
MJB2010 MJB2010 (Guide) Guide Expert Nurse

I am sure some of you have read my other posts about my current job situation, and I am not happy where I am at. I am a new grad and the market is tought right now. I have an interview for a new grad program and not sure what to say about my current job situation at the interview.

I am kind of in a bind because I left it off the application. I put my last job (left in Sept) as my last job (PCT) and did not put my current job (RN) on at all. Now I have to decide if I want to tell them at the interview about my current job and try to explain it away (not having mentioned on the app) or just not bring it up & not tell them at all and hope they dont find out. The rest of my resume is great and I have excellent references from all previous jobs.

My current situation is a mess, I brought up some concerns about my training and my preceptor went on the warpath. She had never trained before, and frankly should not have been training anyone. She blamed it all on me, saying she was teaching me the right way but I was lazy and slow. She cuts a lot of corners, and my brain is still NCLEX land so I am still trying to sort out which corners are ok to cut and some of her med practices are scary scary scary to me. I want to learn the proper way first. I know she has been written up numerous times for med errors, and that makes me nervous having to learn from her.

I applied for a new grad program, this is what I want. Something specific for new grads.

I know I should tell them at the interview, but with the fierce competition for new grads, I think leaving it off is a better shot of getting the job. And since I have only been there about a month, I am not sure if they will find out about it.

Ugh what I should do and want to do are different. Advice?

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

I thin you are right: jobs are tough to find. Therefore, I wouldn't want to start off on the wrong foot - I'd fess up if I were you and just say that you know its not a good fit at your current job.

Besides, it will turn up on the background check. Better to tell them first than have them find out.

tyvin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice / Psych / RNAC.

Be prepared because it is a program for new grads; that usually means grads with no experience. Maybe someone else knows someone who has gotten into one of the New Grad Programs when being employed as an RN and could give you some advice.

The background check they do where I am is a federal with fingerprints and only checks what you have been charged with concerning the justice system. It does not include a credit check or a list of your past employers.

You may not even qualify for this "new grad" job if you are working as an RN. I think it'll look bad on your part for lying on your resume and not including your current job. That would be red flags to them. They aren't going to find out about your current job with a background check so I wouldn't mention it.

MsQueensRN, LPN, LVN

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 6 years experience.

I say don't mention it. You haven't been there long, you haven't made it through the probation period, and with the way your preceptor sounds it seems as those you weren't supposed to make it.

It is so sad and scary that the employer would give you a preceptor who has been written up numerous times and is obviously not an educator. I know that we are taught to be humble when dealing with a preceptor, but you don't want to learn dangerous practices that could lead you to losing a license you worked so hard to earn.:nurse:

My bad. My experience has been that employers run a thorough background check complete with past employment history. It may not apply where you are.

I think my current place, due to the lack of staffing, decided to overextend with hiring new grads. They didnt have anyone to train us so basically any warm body was fine, and they have been cutting training short. They dont seem to care if the training is proper so long as they have a name to put on the schedule. Scary! I worked to hard to get this license, I dont want to stay somewhere that I know I could risk it.

My bad. My experience has been that employers run a thorough background check complete with past employment history. It may not apply where you are.

They may do that, I have no idea. I do not like to lie, but I feel like I have to. If I tell them, they wont hire me if I dont they may but I may get canned later. Its a no win. It may be a non issue if I dont get past the first round of interviews. The guilt is going to be bad though.

coolpeach

Specializes in ER/Ortho.

I was in a similar situation. My employer gave me a preceptor who was a fresh on TPAPN peer assistance for drugs. She was in her early 20's, never stopped texting, meeting guys of the net (she had never met) in the hospital lobby leaving me with crashing patients in CT scan, filling me in on her sexual exploits, and treating me like crap. I complained to the manager who told me she was a great nurse, and I was the problem. I had finished the internship, and waiting till I completed the orientation then gave my two week notice. While the unit manager hated me, her manager actually understood what had happened, and didn't want any problems. She gave me a wonderful letter of reference, and they let me finish my two weeks out.

I applied for a job at one of the best hospital systems in our area a week prior to the end of my two week notice. I was hired 2 days before my last day at my old hospital. I put them on the app, and when asked I told the absolute truth, that is was just not a good fit. Because I had already had experience they hired me as a direct hire (not a new nurse), but understanding that my experience was limited I got a full 3 month orientation. The other job actually helped me because its really hard here to get hired on in an internship (nobody wants to pay to train new nurses). That job gave m just enough experience to get into the door as a experience nurse (even though it was only 3 months worth).

The main thing is you have to give a two week notice at your old job, and try your best to leave on good terms, and get a letter of reference. If you don't it could haunt you for some time. You will always have a black mark, and it could make it more difficult for you to get a job. I know here we have company where employers can write information about an employee. Unhappy managers can say anything they want (that the employee was lazy, unsafe, etc etc). The perspective employer can read it and often decide to not to hire you.

I am pretty sure that when they do a check of your SS# and info its going to pop up your job. Everything is computerized now and there's no way to hide it. They may feel you have been dishonest because omission is a type of dishonesty. They could think that you are lying in order to get into a new grad program even though your already working or they could think your trying to hide something. Remember a giant part of nursing is ethics, taking responsibility and honestly. If they feel you are someone will be dishonest by omission on your resume then you might do the same thing on charting or with meds.

I am not saying this is true or judging you, but just being devils advocate and telling you what I think could happen. Your best chance is trying to be truthful, but that may not help, but it is better than not saying anything and letting them come to you. My best advice is never omit on your resume.

I was in a similar situation. My employer gave me a preceptor who was a fresh on TPAPN peer assistance for drugs. She was in her early 20's, never stopped texting, meeting guys of the net (she had never met) in the hospital lobby leaving me with crashing patients in CT scan, filling me in on her sexual exploits, and treating me like crap. I complained to the manager who told me she was a great nurse, and I was the problem. I had finished the internship, and waiting till I completed the orientation then gave my two week notice. While the unit manager hated me, her manager actually understood what had happened, and didn't want any problems. She gave me a wonderful letter of reference, and they let me finish my two weeks out.

I applied for a job at one of the best hospital systems in our area a week prior to the end of my two week notice. I was hired 2 days before my last day at my old hospital. I put them on the app, and when asked I told the absolute truth, that is was just not a good fit. Because I had already had experience they hired me as a direct hire (not a new nurse), but understanding that my experience was limited I got a full 3 month orientation. The other job actually helped me because its really hard here to get hired on in an internship (nobody wants to pay to train new nurses). That job gave m just enough experience to get into the door as a experience nurse (even though it was only 3 months worth).

The main thing is you have to give a two week notice at your old job, and try your best to leave on good terms, and get a letter of reference. If you don't it could haunt you for some time. You will always have a black mark, and it could make it more difficult for you to get a job. I know here we have company where employers can write information about an employee. Unhappy managers can say anything they want (that the employee was lazy, unsafe, etc etc). The perspective employer can read it and often decide to not to hire you.

I am pretty sure that when they do a check of your SS# and info its going to pop up your job. Everything is computerized now and there's no way to hide it. They may feel you have been dishonest because omission is a type of dishonesty. They could think that you are lying in order to get into a new grad program even though your already working or they could think your trying to hide something. Remember a giant part of nursing is ethics, taking responsibility and honestly. If they feel you are someone will be dishonest by omission on your resume then you might do the same thing on charting or with meds.

I am not saying this is true or judging you, but just being devils advocate and telling you what I think could happen. Your best chance is trying to be truthful, but that may not help, but it is better than not saying anything and letting them come to you. My best advice is never omit on your resume.

I already submitted the online app, so now its either tell them at the interview (it was not on my app) and let them decide if they are willing to take me, or just not say anything unless asked. Either way I feel like its a black mark on my record. The place is a nightmare. I feel stuck.

coolpeach

Specializes in ER/Ortho.

I was just thinking...most apps have a spot that says "Is it ok to call this employer?. If you check "no" for a current employer I think a lot of times its ok because they realize you currently work there and you may not have told them yet. When you go in for the interview you could say I didn't list my current employer because I haven't told them I am leaving yet. Its just not a good fit for me, and I think they will be upset when I get a two week notice. I didn't want to take a chance on being let go without a job in place. They usually will not call if say don't and consider the fact they you are currently employed and have not been fired a sign that you must be in good standing with your current job. Tell your new employer that you have to give a two week notice before starting this gives her the impression that your are a professional and will be respectful if you leave your new company. This will also improve the chances that you can turn the horrible experience into something that wont haunt your resume.