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working plus nursing school

Pre-Nursing   (796 Views 6 Comments)
by amber_lashelle amber_lashelle (New Member) New Member

370 Visitors; 1 Post

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I just need possibly a little advice or opinions from any nurses out there? I am currently a CNA for hospice right now and absolutely love it. Also, growing up seeing what my mom does as a nurse, I have decided (a while ago) that I'm sure I want to become a nurse... it is my passion and dream! I am currently on my last pre-req (A&P2) for the nursing program, I actually have all the BSN pre-reqs. My only issue is work and school... yes I'm aware, it's certainly barley, if at all, possible... the only nursing programs offered in my area are full time... I am willing to cut down to two 12 hour shifts on the weekends although it will be difficult financially... I am paying about $800 in bills a month... I mainly get grants to cover tuition so I am lucky in that aspect... my question is, I know this is possible or else there would not be so many nurses... I am contemplating starting out with LPN and working my way up only because I don't know if I can make the financial commitment to completle the RN or BSN program at this time... then that way I could work less and make more as I am working on my RN... the other option I suppose would be to take out loans to pay my bills but I am not always sure if I will have that to rely on to get me through... any nurses out there that have maybe been through this, please explain to me your path to get to where you are and if I am doin the right thing I don't want bills to be what holds me back this is my dream! I would greatly appreciate any advice :) PS- financial support from my family isn't an option right now my mom no longer is working due to a chronic illness.Thanks, Amber :)

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rubato works as a RN.

15,584 Visitors; 1,111 Posts

A lot of people worked in my program (community college RN program). It seemed we were all divided into two groups: school and work or school and family. I only think 2 or 3 people had kids and worked and went to school (I still don't know how they did it).

Working the whole weekend is fine, as long as you understand that you will have to do almost all of your studying during the week. Basically, you won't have a lot of free time.

As far as starting out slow and doing LPN first, that's a good plan if you don't want to risk how overwhelmed you might be going straight for the BSN. But, I'd be tempted to go straight for the BSN myself. It's a personal choice. You'll have to figure out what you can handle.

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4,537 Visitors; 376 Posts

Funny thing is, LPN school is intense, getting all that crammed in a short amount of time, no one really worked in my class

In RN school, which starts in January (not a bridge) every one is working like 20-40 hrs a week.

I'll be working 24 hrs one week16 the next.

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4,537 Visitors; 376 Posts

I am so happy with my path

LPN first, I knew nothing about healthcare

Started working as a nurse, did pre-recs

Now I'm getting my school paid for from where I work, I pay for books, and uniforms.

They have a partnership with a cc ADN program.

After ADN, I'll work as a RN, and get my BSN.

I'm so happy I'm doubling it this way!!!!

I wouldn't change it

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2,065 Visitors; 35 Posts

Honestly, I think you should just go for you BSN and get it over with. There are many scholarships out there too so you don't have to rack up much debt. That is what I am doing. I will have some loans, but I feel that it will be worth it in the end to be finished with school and I can start building my career. I start my BSN program in the spring 2013 and I'll be done by Dec 2014. NO MORE SCHOOL...(of course, unless I pursue my NP degree ;) )

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Philly_LPN_Girl has 5 years experience and works as a LPN.

13,087 Visitors; 718 Posts

LPN programs are just as intense as an RN program but if you find that you are not able to cut down work and dont want to depend on loans, then find a part time nursing program even if it is LPN and just bridge over to RN, either path is good and either way you are still a nurse and doing what you love. My cousin went to school for RN and didn't work at all and depended on food stamps and loans to pay her bills and take care of her children so I am sure that you will be fine good luck :)

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