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Why is BSN required for CRNA?

Nurses   (12,641 Views | 196 Replies)
by MM1989 MM1989 (New) New

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

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On 12/18/2019 at 1:41 AM, MM1989 said:

Jeez folks, just was curious why they’d require a BSN over chemistry in a field that is much more related to science than whatever the hell a BSN teaches. That’s it.... a couple people actually answered the question, while others wanted a pissing match. 

Probably because you demeaned us that obtained our hard earned BSNs.  Just sayin'

Anyway CRNA is an advanced nursing degree so it makes sense that a BSN would be preferred over chemistry.  You certainly would be okay in CRNA school but BSN programs require more advanced assessment, pathophysiology and research that would be useful in CRNA school.

But I get why someone with a Chemistry degree that's worked through an associates degree would not want to get a BSN and spend all that extra time, especially if also the school requires 2 years of critical care experience,  if CRNA is the end goal.  (not sure where the underline came from..weird)

All the best.

Edited by Tweety

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3 hours ago, Tweety said:

...but BSN programs require more advanced assessment, pathophysiology and research that would be useful in CRNA school.

Assuming I'm understanding you correctly and you're comparing the BSN curriculum to the ADN or diploma RN curricula, that's not really true. There's no additional pathophysiology at all, and additional education in either assessment or research (statistics class notwithstanding) tends to be incredibly basic. If the BSN offered substantially improved education in these areas over the ADN and diploma, I'd be much happier with it and the push to make it the entry-level degree for RNs. 

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

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19 minutes ago, Cowboyardee said:

Assuming I'm understanding you correctly and you're comparing the BSN curriculum to the ADN or diploma RN curricula, that's not really true. There's no additional pathophysiology at all, and additional education in either assessment or research (statistics class notwithstanding) tends to be incredibly basic. If the BSN offered substantially improved education in these areas over the ADN and diploma, I'd be much happier with it and the push to make it the entry-level degree for RNs. 

Actually I was comparing a BSN degree with a Chemistry Degree.

However, fair enough, it is pretty basic, but a bit more detailed than I got in my ADN program....in my experience.  Your experience is yours.   My BSN program however did have a separate class in Pathophysiology that was more detailed than my ADN patho, but still basic I suppose.  Also Community Health was covered in detail which wasn't in the ADN program.  

Whether ADN vs. BSN should be the entry level degree for nursing has been debated ad nauseam in the 20 years I've been around AllNusres and I've stayed out of it for a long time now.  LOL

Edited by Tweety

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Rodman has 25 years experience.

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Short answer is that to get a Master level degree (CRNA) you must first have a BS

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7 hours ago, rebeccaUTA said:

If the OP has a bachelors in chem already (I'm not sure how that was ascertained but someone said it and the OP didn't correct them) then why is she getting an ADN vs a transition to BSN

MM1989, do you already have a prior 4yr degree? If so, please disregard the next line.

In what world do people get doctorates without having a bachelors degree? 

I'm currently a Senior 2 BSN student. I've been an LVN for over ten years and I can confidently day that the BSN curriculum has had a HUGE impact on my appreciation for and adaptation to evidence-based practices. If that aspect of nursing isn't drilled into your head then you most certainly shouldn't be responsible for putting patients under. Just my opinion. It's one of the most critical, if not the most critical, nursing roles. As far as why a BSN is required for most CRNA schools... because evidence-based-practice says it's safer for patients if they have the BSN and at least one year of critical care experience first. And we are here for the patients - not ourselves. 

We take Leadership this semester, but I suspect that will also be extremely valuable moving forward in my nursing career. Advance practice degrees aren't just "more school". There is so much more you get out of continuing your education, regardless of what degree you're seeking. Nothing is useless when it comes to furthering your professional education, IMO.

Some pharm d. programs just require pre-reqs. You can hash that out in 2 years and go into your 4 years graduate program.

Edited by popopopo

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