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Where is ths so called Nursing Shortage at!? im having a hard time finding work

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SO i finally passed the Nclex-rn (thank God!) and im looking for work. most hospitals want a year or more experience. i have experience with clinical s at one of the best hospitals in Atlanta, GA. Im trying to find a job and its very hard. what should i do. how can i stand out. I dont lie on my resumes but it actually looks really good.

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

Clinical rotations do not qualify as "experience." They want work experience. Everyone who graduates from a nursing program goes through clinical rotations. You'll just have to keep applying, and realize that the first job you get may not be your "forever job." You may have to do something you don't want to do; most of us didn't get a "dream job" right off the bat.

Good luck.

Rural areas is where the shortage is. I have been up to my elbows in job offers and sign on bonuses out here in the boonies.

Nurse_

Specializes in Trauma | Surgical ICU. Has 7 years experience.

The shortage is for experience nurses.

If you have a really good resume then you should have at least landed a job interview. The market is really stiff for new grad and if you already had clinicals in one of the best hospitals in GA then why not ask those you work with for referrals?

It is not how you think your resume or experience looks but how it is perceived by the employer.

You can stand out by doing volunteer works and getting certifications on PALS or ACLS.

I'm surprised you haven't heard that there ISN'T a shortage where you are. Jobs are much more easily obtained in the very rural/remote areas (as RNbygrace mentioned) OR if you have much-desired specialty experience. Other than that....not much need, especially for a new grad.

Try LTC, which often has a higher turnover--true, it may not be what you wanted, and the higher turnover is probably because of that factor with so many new grads, but at least you'll gain experience.

Be sure you let anyone and everyone know you are willing to do nights, weekends, holidays, anything at all (you are, aren't you?) to get yourself in the door.

Jillybean48

Specializes in Med/Surg, Peds, Geriatrics, Home Health. Has 16 years experience.

Unfortunately Nursing is one of those careers that works by supply and demand. There may have been a shortage in your area when you started school, then there's always an overflow of them. It's an endless circle. It also doesn't help that this supply and demand plays a HUGE part in the pay rate. With my 16+ years experience my pay rate continued to decrease in the last couple of years where I am at because there are too many of us. Just 10 years ago I was paid $10 more per hour than what I am currently making. Some places pay for your experience and some don't. I am currently paid like I just graduated school. The law of supply and demand can be a cruel witch.

brandy1017, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

Unfortunately Nursing is one of those careers that works by supply and demand. There may have been a shortage in your area when you started school, then there's always an overflow of them. It's an endless circle. It also doesn't help that this supply and demand plays a HUGE part in the pay rate. With my 16+ years experience my pay rate continued to decrease in the last couple of years where I am at because there are too many of us. Just 10 years ago I was paid $10 more per hour than what I am currently making. Some places pay for your experience and some don't. I am currently paid like I just graduated school. The law of supply and demand can be a cruel witch.

How are you making so much less? Are you agency and the rates are less now? Are you working in a lower paid area of nursing like home care or clinic? Did they cut differentials? Just curious how you are making less now.

Where I work they got rid of the weekend program twice, (the second time it was less generous than the first) but have grandfathered in the few who remain. Another hospital in the area cut back there very generous shift/weekend differentials after spending a fortune on a new hospital. We still get pay raises, but they are less only 2-3% if you're lucky! Other hospitals have periodically used wage freezes to save money blaming the bad economy, all the while spending millions on new hospitals in the suburbs! Pensions have disappeared in favor of 403b in most of the area hospitals! Health insurance just gets more expensive, with more out of pockets, if you are hospitalized you can end up owing thousands of dollars out of pocket! It's just crazy!

Agency pay varies by where you work though I was surprised at the wages of some of the agency nurses we have, around $30/hr used to hear about $40-50 where I live. Not sure if that is just this particular agency. Also I known some travelers that made $50/hour, others that made much less, but think it is because of the particular agency. A nursing assistant says her agency pays her less than it used to, but she stayed with them because she liked them. Occasionally we have had agency or pool nurses come to regular staff because they liked the hospital and the patient ratios and wanted benefits and regular hours.

Edited by brandy1017

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 5 years experience.

The shortage is for experience nurses.

If you have a really good resume then you should have at least landed a job interview. The market is really stiff for new grad and if you already had clinicals in one of the best hospitals in GA then why not ask those you work with for referrals?

It is not how you think your resume or experience looks but how it is perceived by the employer.

You can stand out by doing volunteer works and getting certifications on PALS or ACLS.

When "experienced" nurse shortage gets bad enough, they'll have to hire and it'll be insane again. They know they're getting by with lots of experienced nurses being not quite ready to retire OR have retired from full-time but remain working as a part-time...

ruralnurse84

Specializes in LTC, Rural, OB. Has 3 years experience.

I just graduated with my ADN, haven't even been able to schedule my NCLEX and I start working next week. Thank you rural Montana. The three towns that I am close to are all short of nurses and they are definitely willing to hire new grads. If you can, work somewhere rural for a time.

Jillybean48

Specializes in Med/Surg, Peds, Geriatrics, Home Health. Has 16 years experience.

How are you making so much less?

I went from working in LTC with many patients to working agency home care; they say "You are only taking care of one patient"; this is their reasoning.

bbroge143

Has 7 years experience.

I graduated in May with my ADN. I've already taken my NCLEX, so officially a RN. I have a year of experience as a LVN in LTC, where I am currently working one shift a week as a RN. I have applied to 20 or more RN positions and have gotten 3-4 rejection emails so far. I feel your frustration.

Branch out. Check rural hospitals. Look at the "undesirable" units (this is subjective). Apply to any & all positions you qualify for. Do not let night shift or rotating shift dissuade you. You've got to start somewhere.

Also, beef up that resume. Some classes that could do so:

  • Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support
  • EKG certification
  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support
  • NIH Stroke