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What do you think about computers on you unit?

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evltwnRN evltwnRN (New) New

Hi All,

I need some input. I have an essay to write in one of my classes on technology and nursing. My topic is "Do computers bring the nurse back to the bedside?"

The L & D unit I work on has only been computerized for about 5 months. Does anyone else out there have an opinion on if computers are good or bad? If you work L & D I am especially interested.

Thanks :rolleyes:

begalli

Specializes in Critical Care/ICU.

We have computerized charting in our adult ICU (not L&D, but we do sometimes get bleeding post-delivery moms!). There is one computer for each bed...they are at each bedside.

The thing I like is that if you are busy and unable to chart exactly on or near the hour, the computer, which communicates with the monitors, has that information stored and the info can be easily retrieved by simply entering the time you wish to chart. You can chart by the minute if you want to.

Computer charting is quite simple and fast, freeing up time for patient care. It's kind of like doing fill-in-the-blank with pull-down menus populated with common charting entries. There's also plenty of opportunity to add remarks for something out of the ordinary or to elaborate on a certain issue.

The bedside computers also make keeping care plans updated and retrieving labs, entering orders, etc, easier.

I think it's safer because it's definitely easier to read. I like it.

Also it's nice to have the internet available at the bedside for looking up info on drugs, disease processes, and checking your email! :)

our bedside computers don't "talk" to the other programs the hospital has. They don't even talk to Postpartum. The only internet is at the nurses station. Yours sound much better. If I had the ability to pull labs up at the bedside it would be a much better program we do get some pretty sick moms that need ICU type care in labor.

chris_at_lucas_RN, RN

Has 7 years experience.

I think if you are fast on the computer, at least faster than writing by hand, being able to chart online is great. It saves time and it can give us more time with the patient.

A unit I interviewed for had computers managing medications as well, like a little Pixis for each patient. ID bands had bar codes. I thought it was great.

But I also like computers generally, I like being able to look up a patient's reports--and general info online, and I prefer to chart by hand as little as possible.

I can understand not liking them if you have been used to not having them. Change of any sort can initially drive anyone nuts.

Marie_LPN, RN, LPN, RN

Specializes in 5 yrs OR, ASU Pre-Op 2 yr. ER.

In the OR, so far, they're not realistic.

Supervisors have told us "You can take these computers out to inteview the pt." Yes, facing a computer screen and asking your pt. questions. How personable.

So far what circulators are doing is taking the old paper chating forms out to interview, then taking that info off of the paper and entering it in the computer in the room.

In the OR, so far, they're not realistic.

Supervisors have told us "You can take these computers out to inteview the pt." Yes, facing a computer screen and asking your pt. questions. How personable.

So far what circulators are doing is taking the old paper chating forms out to interview, then taking that info off of the paper and entering it in the computer in the room.

Voice recognition technology has come a long way. There are some fairly inexpensive programs that will do it pretty well. I still have some voice recog s/w that I bought that I haven't had a chance to play with...hopefully, during break...

But...why is it more personable to go out with papers than with a computer? If the computer is too big, then maybe a tablet PC or a PDA would be a better choice.

----

Personally, when I first did a clinical in acute care, all I could think of was: how archaic everything was (granted, I live in Silicon Valley, and I worked for cutting-edge software companies before going to nursing school)....somehow, I think nursing informatics is in my future...

NurseFirst

Marie_LPN, RN, LPN, RN

Specializes in 5 yrs OR, ASU Pre-Op 2 yr. ER.

Reason why i say that the computers aren't so personal, is that our computers are keyboards, and big screens on wheeled carts. A tablet PC would be ideal, but the hospital board said it would be too easy for someone to sneak it our of the building.

I use computers to pass medications via barcoding, take off orders assess, interview, and everything, they day has come. I work for a paperless system.

I use computers to pass medications via barcoding, take off orders assess, interview, and everything, they day has come. I work for a paperless system:uhoh21: :) :o :rotfl:

Reason why i say that the computers aren't so personal, is that our computers are keyboards, and big screens on wheeled carts. A tablet PC would be ideal, but the hospital board said it would be too easy for someone to sneak it our of the building.
A solution for the hospital board. There are gadgets out there that you can attach to small items that will set off alarms if they go outside a given area. We have them in the UK, so I'm sure you've got them over there!

To go back to the original question though. We have just got an all singing, all dancing computer system that talks to other computers in the hospital and is one multiprofessional record. The nurses have told me it doesn't bring them back to the bedside, but they agreed with me when I suggested that it must do, because they used to complete the documentation at the nurses station and now they do it at the bedside, so more time spent more time at the bedside. Now they are used to it, they also spend less time on documentation, so more time for the bedside (theoretically anyway). The nurses also said an advantage is that the computer system has improved the quality of documentation (legibility, accuracy, amount)

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