What other schools are dropping MSN for DNP?

Posted

Specializes in Med-Surg, Tele, Psych. Has 4 years experience.

I was researching online FNP programs and came across University of Missouri. It seems that after the deadline of Feb 2011 for Fall 2011, they will not offer an MSN for FNP, only a DNP. What other schools are doing this now?

GM2RN

1,850 Posts

University of Michigan has done it for at least a couple of years now.

PMFB-RN, RN

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Trauma Rapid Response. Has 16 years experience. 5,327 Posts

All the the University of Wisconsin nursing school are accepting their last MSN for NP classes this year. After that DNP only. The nurse hating nurses have had their way.

dp1200

69 Posts

The nurse hating nurses have had their way.

That's how I see it too. I'm baffled by this move to the DNP, and I don't see how it's going to do anything but utterly kill the NP level of provider while increasing healthcare costs. It's not good for anyone outside of academia.

PMFB-RN, RN

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Trauma Rapid Response. Has 16 years experience. 5,327 Posts

That's how I see it too. I'm baffled by this move to the DNP, and I don't see how it's going to do anything but utterly kill the NP level of provider while increasing healthcare costs. It's not good for anyone outside of academia.

*** About the only thing that makes any sence to me is that those who decided on the DNP for entry into advanced practice have a deep self loathing and low self esteem that they extend to their fellow nurses. What else but a desire to see those they consider beneith them (actualu bed side nurses) suffer would motivate them to inflict such a degrading and expensive hurdel for those RNs who are currently doing bedside care.

Either that or it's about sombody making a lot of money off the backs of the bedside RNs.

TonieRN

46 Posts

Indiana State University has jumped on the bandwagon too.....no more MSN....bringing in the DNP.....

mariahas4kids

Specializes in hospice, corrections. Has 3 years experience. 86 Posts

I just got accepted into Gonzaga University's RN-MSN FNP online program. :D I was told that this the last class for this program because after this it is moving to a DNP program to comply with the mandate that all nurse practitioners have a doctorate starting in 2015. I know that a lot of hospitals in my area are going to only hire BSN after 2012. I'm not sure why the push for more educational requirements.

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 26 years experience. 3,726 Posts

University of Pittsburgh dropping MSN for DNP too. Final MSN entry Fall 2011.

Edited by ghillbert

PMFB-RN, RN

Specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Trauma Rapid Response. Has 16 years experience. 5,327 Posts

That's how I see it too. I'm baffled by this move to the DNP, and I don't see how it's going to do anything but utterly kill the NP level of provider while increasing healthcare costs. It's not good for anyone outside of academia.

*** It's just selfishness. Those who are already advanced practice nurses have everything to gain by raising the entry point. A point they will be grandfathered into and will not have to meet themselves. It's very simple, limit access to the profession to everybody behind you and you will become more valuable.

elkpark

14,633 Posts

*** It's just selfishness. Those who are already advanced practice nurses have everything to gain by raising the entry point. A point they will be grandfathered into and will not have to meet themselves. It's very simple, limit access to the profession to everybody behind you and you will become more valuable.

I don't think it's that simple. In the first place, not a great many current, experienced advanced practice nurses support this idea, as far as I can tell (I certainly don't). In the second place, getting "grandfathered in" doesn't necessarily mean you're all set and everything's rosy. Sure, the current MSN-prepared APNs will be legally able to continue practicing as they are now. But that doesn't mean that they will necessarily continue to be competitive in the job market if, somehow, unbelievable as it may seem, the DNP becomes widely accepted and becomes the preferred credential. Also, people who are grandfathered in and continue to practice with a lower level of education/preparation than currently required are able to do so in their current state of licensure, but would probably have problems moving to another state. That's what happened with the "certificate" NPs who were grandfathered in when the MSN became the requirement for new people -- they didn't lose their ability to practice in their "home" state, but they couldn't get licensed in a new state if they wanted to move. The current population of experienced APNs will basically become a class of "second class citizens" within the advanced practice community.

I can guarantee you that the push for this is NOT coming from the existing APN community or the larger healthcare community -- it's coming from academia and nursing "leadership."

Leela81

Specializes in Medical. 22 Posts

University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus has moved to DNP