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Want to get MSN but don't know what specialty

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Specializes in ICU, Triage, Home Health, soon-to-be FNP. Has 16 years experience.

I have 2 years to decide which school and what specialty to get my MSN. I know this is weird, but I'm in this interesting predicament: I have 2 years to take my post 9/11 GI bill to pay for my education (I can't transfer it to my children unfortunately plus it expires in 2 years), I am currently working per diem in an ICU, in about 2 years my children will be old enough that I can start taking classes, I am interested in advancing my career in nursing but just don't know what.

I am thinking of FNP primarily because I believe that it will improve my knowledge. I also feel that with an NP, if I don't really want to practice and prescribe, my work options will be more broadened.

I like the idea of being a case manager or a private duty nurse once I'm done in the ICU.

Any suggestions/ideas/questions would help. thanks in advance

AJJKRN

Specializes in Medical-Surgical/Float Pool/Stepdown. Has 6+ years experience.

I honestly want to do the MSN for Leadership through WGU and then look into a post masters for NP on down the line...possibly. Right now, practically everyone wants to become an NP from new grads to (more deservingly IMHO) really experienced nurses. Why wouldn't someone brand new to nursing just do a direct entry program and not waste the bedside nurses time and the entity's money on training to only be around for a few years? Yes harsh and yes for a different thread!

I would like to go a head and get my masters - and maybe an MBA to boot - and see how the NP market for decent education, pay, and jobs eventually work out. I'll be paying mainly out of pocket though so I think you definitely have more options with the GI Bill.

Thank no you for your service and protecting our freedom! :inlove:

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

It seems like everyone and their mommas wants to enroll in NP programs. Even in the face of a primary care shortage, I still think the NP market has the potential to become glutted.

I am currently enrolled in an MSN degree program with a specialization area of nursing education. Although nurse educators do not earn the big dollars, my education will result in the potential for a less physical job in nursing when I am older and ready to scale back.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Can you find a really "general" MSN (such as "leadership" or "CNL") that will move you forward, but leave lots of options open? You could then on a couple more classes at your own expense -- or for free with tuition reimbursement from your employer -- to go in another direction once you know what that direction is.

I agree that the FNP market is in danger of becoming glutted -- and if your heart is not really in it, it seems foolish to throw money in that direction. Personally, I think CNL programs provide a great solid foundation for a large variety of roles, not just the "pure CNL role" they were designed for. But unfortunately, there aren't many of those programs designed for RN's with BSN's already.

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

It seems like everyone and their mommas wants to enroll in NP programs. Even in the face of a primary care shortage, I still think the NP market has the potential to become glutted.

I am currently enrolled in an MSN degree program with a specialization area of nursing education. Although nurse educators do not earn the big dollars, my education will result in the potential for a less physical job in nursing when I am older and ready to scale back.

This. I have no interest in becoming an NP, but I did want to prepare for a less physical job in the future. I also completed an MSN Ed degree. Not currently using it, and I'm leaning more towards staff ed than academic ed for the future.