Jump to content

Too much fluff in nursing programs?

Posted

Do you feel their was too much "fluff" in your nursing program. I think relational practice courses are extremely useful.... but I think maybe 1-2 of these courses are enough. I feel their should be more focus on pharm/patho in nursing, as I feel this would be more useful. How do others feel? Maybe it is different in certain programs?

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

I remember when I was in school sitting through stuff that I thought was "fluff" thinking that it was stuff I would never use. I found the further I got into the program the more sense the "fluff" made.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

Do you mean the elective requirements in the degree? It's to make you a better rounded individual.

My patients are always amazed when we can have a discussion on 17th century literature or medieval law in England. But hey, I'm just a well rounded LPN.

I don't mean electives... I feel those make students well rounded as well. I just mean in my program we had I think at least 3-4relational practice classes that were not designed all that well. As I said I think they are important, maybe 1-2, but 3-4 seemed like too much... so most of us dreaded going. Considering we would get 1 hours of pharm each week and then at least 3 hours of relational practice.... just thought it could have been evened out a bit more.

CodeteamB

Specializes in Emergency. Has 5+ years experience.

I don't mean electives... I feel those make students well rounded as well. I just mean in my program we had I think at least 3-4relational practice classes that were not designed all that well. As I said I think they are important' date=' maybe 1-2, but 3-4 seemed like too much... so most of us dreaded going. Considering we would get 1 hours of pharm each week and then at least 3 hours of relational practice.... just thought it could have been evened out a bit more.[/quote']

What is relational practice? I have not heard this term before.

Relational practice was learning about how to form relationships with patients and families. Active listening skills, understanding yourself, your values, beliefs.... leaving those at the door when dealing with ethical issues, etc.

CodeteamB

Specializes in Emergency. Has 5+ years experience.

Relational practice was learning about how to form relationships with patients and families. Active listening skills' date=' understanding yourself, your values, beliefs.... leaving those at the door when dealing with ethical issues, etc.[/quote']

I see. I never had a specific class on this but my program was designed very differently than most. I agree, 3 hours per week sounds excessive and pretty darn fluffy.

I found it very fluffy, but i see why they have it, as I was a bit older in nursing school (30), some of the people that were quite young seem to benefit from this, as they had less experience relating to all different types of people and families.

probably going to get a lot of flack for this but bare in mind this is my own opinion. my program is fairly good but there are some courses that beat the dead horse so to speak. i think nursing in general foolishly distances itself from medicine and biology and tries to align itself with sociology/psychology when the core of what nurses do regardless of what is taught in school is to treat the biological process of disease in the sick, hurt and dying persons. while courses in the social sciences are an asset i think more focus needs to be given to core science courses. i would much rather have a nurse that knows their pharm inside and out and prevents a doctor from killing me than one that focuses on "validating my feelings". Nursing focuses too much on the qualitative experience and much less on quantitative and tangible evidence which in my opinion is a detriment to our profession as it takes away from our credibility. when we take one semester of basic sciences we can't fully comprehend the reasons for our actions. i know this is anecdotal a prime example is a nurse who i met that was certain tylenol affected blood cultures, really?

in conclusion i know that this will never happen but nursing needs a paradigm shift towards a medical model in line with more scientific rooted education.

Jumper44 I can totally understand where you are coming from and I agree. I would have really appreciated a biochemistry course, more pharm, more anatomy, physiology, path, etc. We did take a full year of anatomy/physio and patho which was very useful but I would have liked more. Through taking some speciality courses and just being in the workforce I have learned a lot but I feel like I will never fully understand the biochemistry behind medications which I wish I would know. I guess with further education and maybe taking a clinical/practical masters I will learn more. I think the relational/arts courses are beneficial but more of a balance would be better... well at least I think.

Victoria's Nursing Program = Fluffy *********!!!!!! :madface:

Edited by Silverdragon102
changed to all **

Working in a hospital we see a lot of new grads coming out of degree programs who are sadly ill prepared to function in a hospital setting. We have been told by numerous educators from various institutions that learning direct patient care is now expected to happen when the students are doing their "pre-grad". So many young people who sadly haven't been taught to properly assess and take care of patients but could start a health program teaching high school students birth control. The focus is definitely more on the psychosocial aspect of peoples lives and not how to take care of them from day to day.

I completely agree with what you've said, but I don't think it's fair to point the finger directly at the nursing programs within the country. As a recent graduate myself, I've sat through countless hours of FLUFF 101, 201, 301 etc. and through reflecting on these experiences, it seems that nursing schools aren't so much preparing us for "real world nursing", they're preparing us to write the CRNE. Anything in between that (if you're lucky) is certainly a bonus. The CRNE has a major focus on the "psychosocial aspect" of nursing, with very little focus on pathophysiology and clinical competence. I'm hoping that shift from the current exam to the NCLEX will impact how nursing schools prepare their graduates to become well-rounded practitioners.

^ this is what worries me!! I am currently in a nursing program filled with fluff and will be the first graduating class to write the NCLEX. I fear that my class is not being adequately prepared for what our exams will cover in the end.

I felt that my nursing program adequately prepared me to pass the CRNE. With that said, I wish we covered more patho and pharm. The fluff will start to make sense later as you progress through your career... And as you go into clinical, you will notice the gap between "real-world" and "textbook" nursing.

I'm sure that the nursing schools will be informed on the types of questions and content of the new exam, and modify the curriculum accordingly. There will be prep guides out there to help you prepare for the new exam.... Takes things a little bit at a time or else you'll stress yourself out...

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

donk, you're still going to be writing the CRNE. The content of the exam will always be determined by Canadian colleges of nursing, the same people who set the standards upon which universities base their curricula. What will change is how the exam is administered. That's all. Canadian nurses will NOT be writing the US version of the NCLEX.

Thank god!! Our instructors have been scaring us with what may be a lot of misinformation.

jamd11

Specializes in Family Practice & Obstetrics. Has 4 years experience.

donk' date=' you're still going to be writing the CRNE. The content of the exam will always be determined by Canadian colleges of nursing, the same people who set the standards upon which universities base their curricula. What will change is how the exam is administered. That's all. Canadian nurses will NOT be writing the US version of the NCLEX.[/quote']

You may want to take a look on the CNOs website regarding the implementation of the NCLEX there's a 13 page PDF explaining the in and outs of the exam and unfortunately it states on the first page that Canadian and US nursing graduates will be writing the SAME exam come January 2015