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Time Management

Nurses   (227 Views 4 Comments)
by freckles96 freckles96 (New Member) New Member

100 Visitors; 2 Posts

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I’m wondering how nurses get meds done on time with only a 30 minute window before and after it’s due?? I’m in my third semester and it seems very challenging to get your vital signs, assessments and meds done in the morning. 

 

Also how late have you been on a medication and what were the penalties?

Edited by freckles96

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience.

1 Follower; 29,051 Visitors; 4,126 Posts

You are correct about mornings being busy getting assessments and meds done.

I make it a point to prioritize assessments, first charting and meds early in the shift; less time-sensitive daily tasks get pushed out until the high-priority stuff gets done. Dressing changes can wait until later, the progress note gets done later, and any thing non-urgent can wait.

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LibraNurse27 has 5 years experience.

2,621 Visitors; 117 Posts

I try to arrive about 15 mins early to look up my patients' diagnosis, past medical history, read most recent MD note and review orders/labs. Then I make an outline of a plan for the day (always subject to change!). After report I check my rooms for equipment/safety, take my vitals and do focused assessments, give 0800 meds. I try to finish my charting before time for 1000 meds but of course usually get interrupted. I try to start passing the meds ASAP and finish within the window.  

I give the time sensitive meds first (cardiac meds, anything on strict timed schedule). If a multivitamin is not given within the arbitrary "timeframe" it's not the end of the world. I always stop to answer call lights even if in middle of passing meds because patient might need assistance to bathroom or be having urgent symptoms. HOPEFULLY management is not so terrible that they won't prioritize urgent patient needs over giving a vitamin on time! Hope this helps.

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Kallie3006 has 6 years experience as a ADN and works as a Jack of all trades, master of none.

5,012 Visitors; 358 Posts

We do bedside report and the majority of my assessment can be completed at that time interacting with the patient, with listening and whatnot aside.  Cluster care is extremely important at the beginning of each shift and that helps a lot with getting meds, vitals, and assessments done. I also arrive early to get a layout started of the day with meds due ect.  There are days when this works great, then there are days when I couldn't even tell you what rooms my patients are in.  That is just the nature of the job 

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