Jump to content

This may be a stupid question...

Nurses   (1,626 Views 13 Comments)
by WakeUpRN WakeUpRN (Member)

WakeUpRN specializes in PACU, Med/Surg.

1,132 Profile Views; 31 Posts

Hi Y'all.

I am currently in nursing school and will finish with an associates degree but plan to continue towards a bsn while I work. I know this is probably a stupid question, but do ADN-RN's and BSN-RN's take the same NCLEX-RN exam? Or do the BSN-RN's simply have more classes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

happybunny1970 has 6 years experience and specializes in Acute Hemodialysis, Cardiac, ICU, OR.

154 Posts; 3,580 Profile Views

Yes, we all take the same NCLEX exam, the difference is in the Degree you receive from your school: The Associates is a good basis, but the Bachelors enables you to enter teaching and administration pretty much immediately (if that's what you're looking for).

The higher degree programs have a more business-minded approach (as well as more classes) from what I understand. We have two ADN programs in this area and one BSN, and I always thought it was funny when I was in school that the floor units we rotated in would audibly groan when the BSN students came on. I'm not saying they're all the same, and I'm pursuing my BSN/MSN now, but most of the BSN students (who had started that way -- not been in Nursing before entering the University) couldn't stick a vein if their lives depended on it, and you sure didn't want them coming at you with a catheter! Of course, most of the people in this category were extremely young as well, not like we who decided to enter Nursing in our 30s and already had some basic skills simply by virtue of Motherhood.

I think my approach is reflected quite a bit in the field: Get the Associates degree to get into Nursing, and then if you want, pursue Bachelors and/or Masters degrees. You don't have to have them to be a good nurse, but you DO have to have them for some specific jobs, or just because you want to accomplish that (I'm doing it for myself, and because in another 20 years I think I'll teach rather than continue in patient care).

Good luck on your exam!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 316,715 Profile Views

Diploma nursing graduates, associate degree graduates, and BSN grads all take the same NCLEX-RN, and all are issued the exact same licensure and privileges upon passing the NCLEX-RN. In other words, they have all earned the same title of 'registered nurse' through their differing educational pathways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WakeUpRN specializes in PACU, Med/Surg.

31 Posts; 1,132 Profile Views

Thanks for the info. I plan to continue with education as long as I can-not just becuase I want better positions but because I love school and love to learn. I am still hazy about the education process in terms of what possibilities one has after attaining various degrees in nursing. I know now that one can obtain a MSN in nursing and be a nurse practioner, right?

What then, after that? If one desired to further thier education after a MSN, would they be on track to medical doctor as the next step?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 316,715 Profile Views

What then, after that? If one desired to further thier education after a MSN, would they be on track to medical doctor as the next step?
After the MSN, a person can earn a doctorate in nursing.

The medical model is very different from the nursing model, so don't get the two confused. A medical doctor has a 4 year baccalaureate degree, and the major is usually biology. Then they attend medical school for 4 years. After graduating from medical school, they attend an internship that lasts anywhere from 3 to 8 years, depending on the specialty. Family practice doctors and general practitioners usually have a 3 year internship, OB/GYNs usually have a 4 year internship, pediatricians usually have a 4 year internship, and so on. Therefore, the least educated doctor will have amassed a minimum of 11 years of postsecondary education and training.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ERRNTraveler is a RN and specializes in Peds, ER/Trauma.

672 Posts; 6,502 Profile Views

You can earn a doctorate in nursing- most who do this end up teaching in nursing programs at a university. There are also specialized master's programs- nurse anesthesia, nurse midwifery, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 316,715 Profile Views

What then, after that? If one desired to further thier education after a MSN, would they be on track to medical doctor as the next step?
There are a handful of doctors out there who started out as RNs, but it is not advisable. If the MD is your goal, you can earn a BSN. Be sure that you take as many challenging natural science courses as possible that will be accepted as medical school prerequisites. After the BSN, you can apply to medical school. After 4 years of medical school, you will specialize in an internship that lasts anywhere from 3 to 8 years. The more specialized, the longer the internship.

There are, however, many MDs who started out as PAs (physician assistants). The PA is a master's degree program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

happybunny1970 has 6 years experience and specializes in Acute Hemodialysis, Cardiac, ICU, OR.

154 Posts; 3,580 Profile Views

Wow! That's a lot of information... I've worked with PAs for years, but really didn't know anything about their education. I just looked up the program at UTMB, and the course is 109 credit hours, a Masters Program as stated in the last post, and costs over $21,000! By comparison, I paid for my ADN (no financial aid), and the cost was about $9000.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tutored specializes in MICU/SICU.

185 Posts; 4,272 Profile Views

Instead of thinking "MD" post-masters, go on for your NP license, and then your doctorate - there's teaching-based, research-based, and nursing-based doctorates (DNSc, PhD, and DNP, respectively) - you can do LOTS of healthcare these days without being an MD! Every doctor I know personally (as opposed to being their patient) is unhappy practicing medicine, these days (mostly due to "rationed care") - EVERY NP I know is happy, confident, and a terriffic role model. Do it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

happybunny1970 has 6 years experience and specializes in Acute Hemodialysis, Cardiac, ICU, OR.

154 Posts; 3,580 Profile Views

I agree -- as long as you're headed down the road of Nursing, I'd continue down that particular road. There are so many branches to try and travel if you get in a rut. Even if you never pursue an advanced degree there is TONS of stuff to learn in each of the different practice areas and fields.

Besides, truth be told, there are a lot of MDs out there who are book-smart but social morons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tutored specializes in MICU/SICU.

185 Posts; 4,272 Profile Views

Amen happy bunny! That's one huge thing we nurses have up on the MDs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×