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The 15 NCLEX Questions that "don't count"

Can anyone tell me how or if the 15 new questions they put on everyone's test in the first 75 work toward your passing or failing the test? I know they don't actually count as part of the grading system BUT if you do two or three in a row is that going to make your grade curve go below the passing level? That being the case your actual questions that count would be pulled down and you would have to build them back up above the passing level. Right?

These are all rumors that are going around. If anyone can verify or discredit them please do so. Thanks.

In reality there are 60 questions within the first 75 that you do which determine if you pass, fail or are borderline. So to really take your time and do your best on the first 75 is a good strategy.

If you see you are going to run out of time make sure to put extra care in the last 60 because they will be the ones that are used to determine if you pass or fail.

If you get to 265 make sure you do the last question correctly because if you get it wrong you fail but if you get it right you pass.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 10 years experience.

Can anyone tell me how or if the 15 new questions they put on everyone's test in the first 75 work toward your passing or failing the test? I know they don't actually count as part of the grading system BUT if you do two or three in a row is that going to make your grade curve go below the passing level? That being the case your actual questions that count would be pulled down and you would have to build them back up above the passing level. Right?
no. The sample questions have no bearing on your pass/fail status. As they are not graded there is no determination of above, at, near, or below passing standard for the sample questions. You are oversimplifying. Please read the NCLEX test plan and FAQ on the NCSBN website for a detailed explanation.

These are all rumors that are going around. If anyone can verify or discredit them please do so. Thanks.

In reality there are 60 questions within the first 75 that you do which determine if you pass, fail or are borderline. So to really take your time and do your best on the first 75 is a good strategy.

not exactly. You are not looking at the big picture here. Again, you are trying to oversimplify a complicated and somewhat abstract grading system. Review the NCLEX test plan and FAQ for detailed explanations.

If you see you are going to run out of time make sure to put extra care in the last 60 because they will be the ones that are used to determine if you pass or fail.
do your best throughout, but if you run out of time they will review your last 60 questions to determine if you are consistently above, at, near or below passing standard. You can shut off the countdown clock while testing.

If you get to 265 make sure you do the last question correctly because if you get it wrong you fail but if you get it right you pass.

false

If you get the last question correct, that is not a guarantee of a pass. Also, if the last question is a above level question and you get it correct, that is not a guarantee pass either!! My last question on NCLEX... #265 was a SATA and I am 100% positive I got it correct---but I failed my NCLEX. I was above passing level in infection control, which was the category the last SATA question I had, but it wasn't enough to pass me :(

Thank you for the replies. It makes me feel some better to know there was no truth in what I had been hearing.

I guess I am just getting a case of big time nerves and anxiety since my test date is less than a week away now.

Trying to calm down, stay focused and keep doing practice questions is not as easy done as it is said. This type test is like a bad dream to a small child. THe more you think about it the larger than life it becomes until it's all you can think of. Maybe I need an exorcist. lol .... or hypnotist. lol :nailbiting: I WILL PASS, I WILL PASS, I WILL PASS....:snurse:

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