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The Fat Doctor: Can You Trust Out of Shape Health Workers?

Stress 101 Article   (16,465 Views | 34 Replies | 647 Words)

new.srna.john has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in CCU, MICU, and GMF Liver.

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Can you trust a doctor who is overweight? Many people experience cognitive dissonance over seeing a healthcare professional who looks physically unfit because this professional is supposed to be an "example for the patients". I contend that this is not often a fully fleshed out critique of healthcare workers. You are reading page 3 of The Fat Doctor: Can You Trust Out of Shape Health Workers?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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But Addiction is still Aaddiction. Some is just more accepted than others and the fact we have the will to stop makes it not a disease.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

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But Addiction is still Aaddiction. Some is just more accepted than others and the fact we have the will to stop makes it not a disease.
Huh? Please use the "Quote" button so we at least know which post elicited this incoherent reply.

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Haven't got a clue what weight and size has to do with medical care. I thought it had to do with knowledge and competence. Pretty sure that medical and nursing school had everything to do with knowledge acquisition which is what is required in the dispensation of our experience. The person who sees it differently is the one likely to be disappointed in multiple ways and not just in the TX dispensed. They possess a flawed logic re rendered services and almost always will be somewhat superficial and hypocritical. I never take such people seriously and avoid them at all costs. Is your accountant required to be attractive or simply knowledgeable about tax laws?

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You make some excellent points. I certainly agree that a good doctor or nurse can help motivate others regardless of his or her own physique, whether by example, contrast, or caring. A person's size alone will not determine that provider's ability.

For some reason though your title made me flash back to Michael Moore's "Sicko." (2007) It was a great movie in so many ways, calling out the failings of our healthcare system on several levels. But I found myself repeatedly distracted by Michael himself, a grossly overweight guy who looked like he was one cupcake from a coronary lumbering around in front of the camera narrating for two hours. It wasn't just a matter of trust. He made some excellent, believable arguments. But, there was an unavoidable credibility gap, a mixed message: "You want us to fix healthcare, but you're breaking the most basic rules." In the end, it appeared that he was blaming the government and the system for his lifestyle choices.

I would say evaluate the three fingers pointing back at you when you point. What does Moore's looks have to do with the message presented? Does the Mona Lisa look different to an art aficionado if displayed in a different setting? I absolutely love judgemental people because they are so easy to own and are so unaware of their vulnerability.

A bit harsh you might say, but it's been my experience that judgemental people are responsible for most of the world's misfortunes.

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175 Posts; 5,492 Profile Views

For the overweight folks. Flat screen TV on the wall in front of a treadmill. Bluetooth headset. Start at five minutes and increase incrementally. In two weeks you'll be up to half an hour without duress. The weight falls off and stays off if adhered to, at least half hour 3x's weekly.

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I want to express my appreciation for the insights and compassion offered by all who contributed to this thread. As is true in most of life, there are multiple viewpoints and perspectives and there is no "one side fits all" when it comes to topics such as this. When a patient finds themselves in a critical care situation, it is doubtful that there is any concern or attention given to the appearance, age, gender, size, shape or background of the people saving their life. Gratitude and an expectation of competency are the primary concerns for any patient at that time. That appropriate perspective can change if I am a patient seeking help from a professional for lifestyle management or looking for modeling of successful behavior change for improved well-being. In my practice, I have seen many patients who are seeking successful strategies for changing the status and condition of their health as well as inspiration for making the often difficult and challenging changes required for health improvement. It is not unlike the old adage of "do as I say, don't do as I do" that is common in parenting. With behavior change, we are often looking to be inspired by and follow the strategies of individuals who have either overcome issues we are working on or who demonstrate successful strategies in their own life to achieve their health and fitness goals. Most of us require inspiration and encouragement to be our best self and working with a role model is a positive way of achieving that. Our patients and clients look to us not only to offer them information and skills, but to also facilitate them to better health and well-being. This is accomplished not only through the physical body, but includes the emotional, environmental, spiritual and chemical aspects of our health. What I have learned as a Whole Health professional (Whole Health Training and Education - Accredited | Holistic Health Programs) is to be the change I wish to see and facilitate for my patients. This makes me a healthier, happier and more productive lifestyle professional. If I were still working in acute care medicine, I think my perspective would be the same as many of you have shared on this thread and I would be more concerned about my competency than role modeling.

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Rota has 37 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care and Emergency Room.

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Being force feed too many calories most days does tend to make us overweight.

Oh wait. We usually put the food into our own mouths.

Sixty-nine percent of the nation is overweight, and most of them by choice.

We choose to consume one extra 100 calorie cookie;

We choose a large fries;

We choose regular milk;

We choose not to exercise on our days off.

Use small food & life changes, plus a little exercise to keep theweight off.

Save 100 calories a day to lose 11 pounds per year. Yes, life is that simple.

Add exercise form say "5K Fitness Run" (substitute walk for run) and you'll see steady results and stick to a better lifestyle.

Pretty soon, your patients will not give you a peculiar look when you give advice about how they can reduce their LDL, or heart attack risk, reduce their BP etc.

Nurses (and doctors) work in a sick care industry. People are sick and want some help. If you and I are going to work in HEALTH care, then we need to be role models. We spend an inordinate amount of money to pay for chronic illnesses most of which are life style induced. As a country, we spend the most on "health"care but we rank last in health outcomes. Most people agree it is because we focus on drugs and not on prevention. The problem is this: there is no money in prevention. Sick people fuel the pharmaceutical industry, the "health care" industry, the cancer society and all those other disease related organizations. Hippocrates stated, "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food". When we as a society learn to eat healthier, we will be healthier.

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1,301 Posts; 11,251 Profile Views

Great information. Great responses. Even though I struggle with weight and empathize with those that do, I feel that I am a role model responsible for helping to set healthy standards. I do agree with the previous poster that quoted Hippocrates that food is medicine. While I don't feel that one should distrust health care professionals who are overweight or obese (we do not know that provider's personal struggles), I do feel that when providing information on nutrition or weight, we should indicate that it is unsafe to be overweight or obese.

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17 Posts; 368 Profile Views

Weight is no joke. The stress alone is conducive to weight gain.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,948 Posts; 172,416 Profile Views

Fat shaming -- the last acceptable frontier for hatefulness.

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Honestly I just think it has shown how attempted interventions on the obesity epidemic have failed. We as the healthcare providers are the first to know of these new measures, and most people would love them to work,however they haven't been very effective. I think the things that are helping to some degree is the regulations regarding nutritional content of food. Our industrialized food is very poor quality and a lot of the toxic stuff is hidden. It's very difficult to avoid these processed foods unless you make an intentional effort, which I think is absurd! Especially for the Healthcare provider who has too many things to focus on rather than spending the energy seeking out quality foods.

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