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Thank you, guides and admins, and everyone else who comments on these threads

Posted

Specializes in hospice.

My ADN is almost finished and I've been researching my next step. The continuing education options for ADN nurses are soooooo confusing to me. One of my instructors has said that it's ridiculous for a person with a bachelor's degree in another field to get a BSN instead of an MSN. I just read a comment by one of you wise, experienced folks stating that it's ridiculous to pursue an MSN unless you want to specialize. This puts my future into perspective.

I think a second Bachelors degree just might be the way to go, for me, for now. I want to optomize my career options for the next few years. Right now, work experience and learning are most important. The advanced degree can come later.

Agree? Disagree?

I agree with you. IMO, most sensible thing is to get some work experience and figure out in what direction you want your career to go before embarking on graduate study. If a BSN is important in your area, there are plenty of reasonable, on-line BSN completion programs.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

One of my instructors has said that it's ridiculous for a person with a bachelor's degree in another field to get a BSN instead of an MSN.

The MSN degree is not necessarily ridiculous unless it is generic with no specialty area. As I've previously mentioned, the entire point of pursuing graduate education in nursing is specialization. If you do not want to be locked into any one specialty area, the BSN degree should open doors for you career-wise.

Medic2RN, BSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, IICU, PCU, PACU, EMS. Has 15 years experience.

I think you have a solid plan by getting the BSN and the experience. I have met so many new grad nurses who go straight into the MSN program without any experience. Some employers consider them "paper' nurses - all degrees and minimal experience. I don't know how marketable that would be.

A positive aspect of getting the BSN with another bachelor's degree under your belt is that you may only have to take the nursing classes which will save you time and money.

Best wishes to you!

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

I agree with the above posters. Get your BSN, work a couple of years or so and then figure out where you want to take your career next. A BSN does open a lot of doors. Go for it!

I'll advocate for the MSN.

If you already have a BA/BS, there's nothing to be gained by earning a second one in favor of an MA/MS. You can get a nonclinical/generalist MSN in management/leadership/systems analysis/operations etc. A few years down the road, with some clinical experience under your belt, you will have options to teach or to move away from the bedside if you choose. Alternative, you could later pursue a 2nd MSN or a specialist certificate CNS/NP.

Either pursue no further education at this time or go for an MSN. A second-degree, post-licensure BSN confers no advantage of which I'm aware.

Raviepoo

Specializes in hospice.

I know where I want to go, eventually, after solidifying my skills. I want a PhD in nursing research. I haven't found a BSN - MSN program that leads down that path. I don't need an MSN to get into a PhD program, from what I've seen. Am I wrong about that?

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I know where I want to go, eventually, after solidifying my skills. I want a PhD in nursing research. I haven't found a BSN - MSN program that leads down that path.

If your goal is to become a nurse scientist/researcher and eventually earn a PhD, you can earn the MSN degree with a specialization in nursing education, infection control & prevention, or some other concentration that places emphasis on research.

Since a great deal of research transpires on the campuses of major universities, earning the MSN with a specialization in nursing education might not be a bad idea to get a foot in the door.

I don't need an MSN to get into a PhD program, from what I've seen. Am I wrong about that?
BSN-to-PhD transition programs do exist.

BSNbeDONE, ASN, BSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

This may or may not be of importance but I found it to be very interesting as I'd never considered this scenario. A colleague of mine obtained an MSN degree (no BSN) after the ASN. Our facility will not give her a position here for whatever reason. Understandably upset, she began looking for positions at other facilities and was told by one that there were currently no MSN positions available. Since my colleague felt betrayed by our current facility, she was hoping to leave and take a nursing position elsewhere.

Being a nurse with experience, that facility chose to not to hire her because they felt that as soon as she found an MSN position wherever, she would be gone (which is probably true). Other facilities that she applied to that have no open MSN positions will not hire this experienced nurse because she has no BSN and hiring her could not be justified. She said she was told that the position required a BSN and for the purposes of employee records and credentials, her file would not reflect that she held the credentials required of the position.

Looks like facilities want what they want, nothing more and nothing less. FYI, there are some educational institutions that, based on the curriculum, will grant both degrees once the MSN requirements are completed. I would ask an advisor if this option is available with their institution since you already know that you plan to go further some day....no harm and nothing binding by asking.;)