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Tell me all about it

School   (305 Views | 4 Replies)
by RosieTheNurse RosieTheNurse (New) New

27 Profile Views; 2 Posts

Hi all 😊

I'm thinking of making the jump to school nursing. 

Can you tell me about a typical day?

Thanks😊

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NutmeggeRN has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in kids.

2 Followers; 6 Articles; 4,016 Posts; 43,394 Profile Views

Well...this year has been bizzare to say the very least!! Aside from C-19, we are often the only medical person in charge of 500+ people. Kids staff and visitors.

We take care of illness and injuries, with appropriate followup and documentation.

We are responsible for ensuring all children meet immunization requirements set forth by our states.

We give daily and PRN meds

We do nursing assessments, especially on our medically complex kid. Then we do treatments as needed. Gtube feeds and flushes, diabetic glucose monitoring, insulin calculation and administration. Emergency meds  Epinephrine, glucagon, MDIs and nebulizers.

We sometimes teach in the classroom, but more often on every visit that comes to your door, there is an opportunity to teach.

We case manage kids who have medically complex needs, attend meetings to support Special Ed and 504 kiddos

 

Just to name a few

But for me, it is about relationship building, helping families at some of their most desperate times, and being that person the kids can come to.

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k1p1ssk has 9 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in pediatrics.

385 Posts; 4,824 Profile Views

I will literally write out a typical day!

I am in a pre-K through 6th public elementary school with an enrollment that hovers around 200 (next year we may be more like 235+ however due to a local permanent school closure).

I arrive at 8:30 and get my office set up; Kids arrive at 9.

I usually have a few kids trickle in with "presents" - clothes they borrowed, meds they need, MD notes, excuse notes, etc. Sometimes a parent with a special request. 

Then, my morning med kids come in - AM stimulants and pre-gym inhaler kiddos.

Then I typically have a 15minute lull; By 9:30, I receive a list of absences that have not called to report. Sometimes I question whether or not the kiddo is actually absent, so I sometimes take a walk around the building and make sure I don't see the kid. I call those families to check in and make sure everything's OK. 

Then the waiting game begins. Usually after an hour and a half, Kids start trickling in with various somatic complaints - the headaches, belly aches, nausea. It's a good time to assess nutritional deficits and find patterns. The pace of student visits picks up from around 10:30 to 1:30 as this is when the recess and lunches are happening, so there are more injuries, plus my mid-day med kids, of which there are many. Most kids are a quick assessment, some quick intervention, and back to class, but I usually have at least 1 or 2 that really need a break, or are OK to stay in school, but can't deal with going out to recess. They will hang with me and do quiet activities inside (reading, coloring, a puzzle). Some will actually nap! I think in a typical week, I probably send 2-4 kids home due to illness. Very rarely due to injury.

The last hour of the day usually drags for me. Most kids realize they are very close to the end of the day and will tough it out in class or their teachers have seen them fine all day and won't let them come to see me. 

I stay until 3:15 or 3:30 depending on the day, though if a kid comes late in the day with fever, vomiting, or other exclusionary symptom, they stay with me until a parent/caregiver can come collect them, because I don't want to send them on the bus!

There are of course meetings with parents and staff, multiple screenings on every student in the school, immunization/chart auditing, and many other organizational tasks & projects. I host 2 nursing students each year for 3-4 days each. I'm sure the teachers would love for me to be in the classrooms more, but that's next to impossible with patient load. 

Some important reminders to consider are that it is a very independent job, so a healthy sense/desire for autonomy is necessary! You are the major decision maker in the health of these students while they are in your care! Its a big responsibility, but a great one. Keep in touch on here if you make the leap!

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2 Posts; 27 Profile Views

Thanks both of you.  I love the autonomy of my current role (home health) - it's appealing that this position has that too.   🙂

I appreciate the info! 🙂

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NutmeggeRN has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in kids.

2 Followers; 6 Articles; 4,016 Posts; 43,394 Profile Views

8 hours ago, RosieTheNurse said:

Thanks both of you.  I love the autonomy of my current role (home health) - it's appealing that this position has that too.   🙂

I appreciate the info! 🙂

I did 5 years of Home Health Care prior to entering the school system. I think that was pivotal in my ability to work as independently as I do. Good luck!

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