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Studying tips for Patho

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by tbrown1 tbrown1 (Member)

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Hello everyone,

Love the thread....

I will be taking patho this summer and was wondering if you all could provide me with any tips on how to study for this class?

I have heard that it is a continuation of AP1 and 2, but for me this is a problem due to me not retaining the majority of the information presented in AP. What advice would you recommend in my case?:uhoh3:

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smattles1of2 has 2 years experience.

282 Posts; 4,136 Profile Views

I got a B in patho, so you can take or leave my advice ;) My percentage was 94 though ;) Anywhoo...after each lecture I organized the notes into double column notes which are basically question/answer style. Then I would skim the book for anything that I didn't really understand. Like acidosis/alkalosis I didn't get at first, so I read the book, search the internet, found tips on here. But I never actually sat down and read the whole book, just parts I didn't grasp right away.

Once all my notes were organized, I would use those to study for the test. I could carry them around with me and study while on the bus or waiting for another class to start or while my husband was driving us to the store, etc.

Good luck! It was a fun class.

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VIXEN007 specializes in Med-Surg.

108 Posts; 2,021 Profile Views

Do not skimp on the reading. It is important to keep up with it. I usually outlined the chapters as I read them and filled in notes from the lecture. I also drew lots of pictures so that I could understand why and how. If there are any quizzes in the books, fill them in, even if not required. I loved Patho. I am sure you will too.

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Daytonite has 40 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt.

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Understanding pathophysiology requires knowing the normal underlying anatomy and physiology. Haul out your A&P textbook and use it along with the pathophysiology book. Pathophysiology is one of the pieces of information you need in piecing together data when critical thinking is involved in care planning. There are lots of websites where you can get supplemental information on most of the pathophysiology of the various diseases. The "patho" part of it is where the normal physiology has gone wrong. If you don't understand the normal physiology to begin with, you're going to be doomed.

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VIXEN007 specializes in Med-Surg.

108 Posts; 2,021 Profile Views

I purchased the Path made incredibly easy! I didn't like it much. There is a green path book that is much better. You will need a good AP like the above poster said. I love my Marieb text. I will never sell it. I carried that big book everywhere. Our Path text was by McCance.

Another thing that I did was to always have notes or flashcards with me. That way I could review if I was waiting in line or sitting somewhere. I would only focus on reviewing 1 bullet point at a time that way.

I called it "Reviewing on the Run." If you have to write lots of papers, we had a paper each week, you can start researching at the beg of the week and then winnow out the stuff that you don't want.

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152 Posts; 2,356 Profile Views

There are many different type of Pathophys books out there. You will find out which style works for you, and then perhaps you can buy a book that is tailored to your learning style. I personally love the Prentice Hall Nursing Pathophysiology, Reviews and Rationales, but that's me. Some may find the content of this book too dry.

I find that when I am trying to grasp a concept, I use a flow chart system. I put the items in order, using bubbles and arrows...it gives me a pictoral view of a system and the process that takes place.

Good luck!!

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11 Posts; 573 Profile Views

oh gosh, I am also taking patho this summer and we just started acidosis/alkalosis today! we spent like 10-20 minutes on it!

i want to offer some tips but I am in the same scenario as you are=) so far I have been reading the assigned chapters before lecture. it really does help understand what the professor is talking about. i take notes shorthand and then i re-write it at home amd make it more concise.

Good luck to both of us and anyone else who's taking it!

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aerorunner80 has 8 years experience and specializes in NICU.

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I'm in Patho right now and I study for it a lot like I studied for my A&P classes. It also helped that our A&P book introduced us to the concepts of patho and our instructors would put bonus questions on our tests about patho.

Here is the information on studying that I got from my instructor. She's awesome by the way!!!

TIPS for success in this class:

The secret to understanding pathophysiology is:

A) Know the basic principles of pathophysiology

B) For each disease we discuss figure out which principle(s) of pathology are involved

C) Think about how one principle of patho may lead to another (this one has helped me TREMENDOUSLY!!!)

The priniciples of Patho are:

1) The four "I's"

Inflammation

Immune Response

Ischemia/Infarction

Infection

2) Obstruction

3) Too much of something (hyper), not enough of something (hypo)

4) Compensation or the effort to maintain homeostasis

5) When items 1-4 don't completely explain the disease, think GENETICS

Note:

Inflammation and the immune response frequently (but not always) go together.

Infection usually calls forth inflammation/immune response. BUT other things also initiate this response.

Organs and cells move things around constantly. Obstruction slows or stops this normal movement. Ask yourself, "What is being obstructed? What are the consequences of the obstruction?" Obstruction may be associated with tumors, masses, strictures, edema, just to mention a few.

What is it that is "hypo/hyper" in a particular situation? AND what are the consequences of that?

THe body is smart and tries to maintain homeostasis by comensating for illness/injury. But the body can only compensate so much, therefore often compensation itself becomes a problem. Ask yourself "How is the body trying to compensate? Is this helping or creating a new problem?"

Finally:

Review normal anatomy and physiology

Learn basic terminology

Review normal anatomy and physiology again

Learn how to use the words primary and secondary

Review normal anatomy and physiology a third time.

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88 Posts; 2,357 Profile Views

Great thread!

I'm starting Patho online this coming Sunday. Yikes!

I have the McCance book and have started studying the first unit as it seems to be the basis for everything else that happens (it focuses on Patho at the cellular level).

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