starting on my own tomorrow-off orientation

Posted

I am starting on my own tomorrow, three days in a row...I would rather do 3 in a row. I am nervous about everything- we are a small unit (not an ICU but an intense step down unit) most of the nurses are brand new grads like me....I really need help with time management and such....can anyone give me any advise/words of encouragement?!?!

Jules A

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner. 8,863 Posts

This is very exciting! Just do your best and try not to get too flustered. The things you didn't plan for today you will keep in mind for tomorrow so each day will get a better and better. Remember mistakes are inevitable, we all make them, so just try to learn from them. :)

Nurseinprocess

Nurseinprocess

194 Posts

I think I have been doing real well with time management as a new nurse, but aside from getting all my tasks complete, I need to work on keeping on top of pt's vitals and output (the stuff that is too easy to forget to look at every so often). I chart as I do each pt's assessment (we are all computerized where I work) instead of trying to play catch up later. I take a sheet of paper and put a sticker/label for each of my pts on it and write next to them what meds are due during my shift (and I cross them off as I give them). That helps me stay on top of what needs to be done. I don't leave anything for anyone else to take care of on oncoming shifts, unless it is a med I couldn't get my hands on for some reason that the pharmacy hasn't sent up yet. You wil be fine being on your own, there are always other nurses to help you out if need be :).

pers

pers

517 Posts

One thing that helped me was not trying to do my initial assessment and med pass at the same time. I go in, introduce myself, give the patient a quick assessment, make sure they don't need anything urgent and let them know I'll be back after I've seen all my other patients. Even though it's an extra trip to each room before meds, I found it saves me a lot of time! It helps me prioritize my med pass and saves me from coming in with meds only to go back out and get the prn pain med or sleeper they want with their evening pills. Patients are also much more understanding when I do run a bit late getting them their meds since I'm not walking in the room for the first time at 10 pm!

Orange Tree

Orange Tree

Specializes in Medical Surgical Orthopedic. 728 Posts

It's very different being on your own ...and it takes some experimenting to figure out a routine that works for you.

I used to go introduce myself to each patient as soon as I got report, but now I just walk by their rooms to make sure they're breathing before I start pulling meds. I realized that my "introductions" were burning up a full hour (about 10 minutes each), and that I ended up getting ice, blankets, jello and bedpans for every patient whose room I popped into. Now that I make rounds after I have my meds pulled, the CNA has usually already been in and taken care of some of the patient's comfort needs. That leaves me able to move fairly quickly and efficiently. I also have vitals and accuchecks to review when I assess my patients as they have already been charted (usually).

And don't worry if you feel hopelessly behind at first....just focus on being SAFE. It's easy to make a stupid mistake when you're rushing and feel overwhelmed, so TAKE the time you NEED.:redbeathe

sweety1

sweety1

25 Posts

Hi,

I am a new nurse and i am nervous about some nursing skills. I need to see it couple of times before i am comfortable. Does can one know where I can watch videos to learn the procedures. I saw some on the utube but not all. Any help will be great.

Thank you

Nurseinprocess

Nurseinprocess

194 Posts

I used to go introduce myself to each patient as soon as I got report, but now I just walk by their rooms to make sure they're breathing before I start pulling meds. I realized that my "introductions" were burning up a full hour (about 10 minutes each), and that I ended up getting ice, blankets, jello and bedpans for every patient whose room I popped into. Now that I make rounds after I have my meds pulled, the CNA has usually already been in and taken care of some of the patient's comfort needs. That leaves me able to move fairly quickly and efficiently. I also have vitals and accuchecks to review when I assess my patients as they have already been charted (usually).

In school we learned that we should do a quick check on all our pts to check lines, tubes, drains, pain, breathing, etc after we get report. I've discovered in the real world of nursing that isn't practical; I can't just quickly run in a room and out. Patients will always ask you for stuff and find a way to keep you in the room with them longer than you planned to be. I know the aides go in to do vitals straight off and if something is amiss with a pt they will let me know, so now I organize my pts by who is getting meds when I start my shift, or who needs a new pca syringe or pain meds first. I can assess someone in 5 minutes or less, but if they all want a drink or a towel or help to the bathroom I get stuck! I don't mind doing it, but I know the aide has more time to do that stuff than I do. I hope the aides realize how much stuff I am taking off their shoulders (I am still not comfortable delegating or telling others to do stuff)! I don't know, it's hard to figure out how to do everything RIGHT. I don't think it's possible to do it all perfect when you have too big of a pt load.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience. 67 Articles; 14,008 Posts

i am starting on my own tomorrow, three days in a row...i would rather do 3 in a row. i am nervous about everything- we are a small unit (not an icu but an intense step down unit) most of the nurses are brand new grads like me....i really need help with time management and such....can anyone give me any advise/words of encouragement?!?!

congratulations! i hope you've identified a friendly face or two for when you inevitably have questions. and no matter how stupid you feel the day after tomorrow, remember that we've all been there and done that and most of us have lived to tell the story!