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Specialties within the NP role

NP Students   (160 Views | 4 Replies)

OncologyCat has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Medical Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant.

601 Profile Views; 76 Posts

Hi all,

I’m looking for some advice on which specialties I should take when applying for NP school. I’ve been toying with the idea of becoming an NP, and I think I will apply at the end of this year for the upcoming Fall 2021 entering period.

I’m an oncology nurse and I want to continue in oncology as an NP. I know I don’t want to work with kids so I ruled FNP out, but many of my coworkers tell me FNP don’t have to treat kids and will have a better chance finding jobs as a new grad. So now I’m conflicted because I initially wanted to do Adult-Gero Primacy care so I can work as an Outpt Onc NP.

Also, I was told that if I don’t want to work critical care and vents, don’t do Adult-Gero acute care, but I’m curious if I want to be an Inpatient Onc NP, do I need to do the acute care track? 

One more thing, will a new grad NP be able to secure a job as an Onc NP right out of school, or do new grads tend to do sth else before they can get into a specialty?

Thanks in advance!

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SopranoKris is a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

3,078 Posts; 32,950 Profile Views

ACNP versus FNP in the hospital setting is state specific. Some states require ACNP for inpatient settings. Those that don't specify, then it's really up to the hiring practices in your facility. Just remember, most ACNP programs are going to require you to have a few years' experience in either critical care or ER before applying. If that's not what you want, and your state and/or local hiring practices don't require ACNP, I wouldn't focus on that.

As for becoming an NP who specializes in oncology, you can do a post-graduate certificate in oncology. That typically includes clinical hours in the oncology specialty. As far as FNP versus Adult-Gero NP, if you only want to work with adults and are seeking employment with practices who work with adults, I don't think it will matter one iota that you are an AGNP versus an FNP. Why waste your time in school on Pediatrics when you will not be treating that patient population?

 

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LadyT618 has 15 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Home Health, Primary Care.

1 Follower; 618 Posts; 6,515 Profile Views

From what I've heard and seen on here at allnurses, RNs with oncology experience usually have found that that experience helped them land jobs as NPs in the oncology outpatient offices right out of school. As far as FNP vs AGPCNP goes, I say do you. I'm biased toward AGPCNP because that's what I did because I didn't wanna deal with kids (and surely didn't even wanna learn about how to care for them). 

Just my opinion, but I think with either one, you'd be ok rounding on patients in a hospital but to work in the actual hospital full time, you'd have to do your research into the hospitals in your area. While some hospitals have no problem hiring FNPs to work, some hospitals are shying away from them and starting to only hire AGACNPs.

Oh, and there's the AOCNP certification exam that you can take once you're an NP

https://www.oncc.org/certifications/advanced-oncology-certified-nurse-practitioner-aocnp

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OncologyCat has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Medical Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant.

76 Posts; 601 Profile Views

On 2/6/2020 at 5:03 PM, SopranoKris said:

ACNP versus FNP in the hospital setting is state specific. Some states require ACNP for inpatient settings. Those that don't specify, then it's really up to the hiring practices in your facility. Just remember, most ACNP programs are going to require you to have a few years' experience in either critical care or ER before applying. If that's not what you want, and your state and/or local hiring practices don't require ACNP, I wouldn't focus on that.

As for becoming an NP who specializes in oncology, you can do a post-graduate certificate in oncology. That typically includes clinical hours in the oncology specialty. As far as FNP versus Adult-Gero NP, if you only want to work with adults and are seeking employment with practices who work with adults, I don't think it will matter one iota that you are an AGNP versus an FNP. Why waste your time in school on Pediatrics when you will not be treating that patient population?

 

Thanks for mentioning the critical care/ER experience requirement for some AGACNP program! I have no desire to work in critical care or ER or peds as a nurse or nurse practitioner so I’ll probably do the Primary care program. Thanks for the advice.

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OncologyCat has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Medical Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant.

76 Posts; 601 Profile Views

On 2/6/2020 at 6:48 PM, LadyT618 said:

From what I've heard and seen on here at allnurses, RNs with oncology experience usually have found that that experience helped them land jobs as NPs in the oncology outpatient offices right out of school. As far as FNP vs AGPCNP goes, I say do you. I'm biased toward AGPCNP because that's what I did because I didn't wanna deal with kids (and surely didn't even wanna learn about how to care for them). 

Just my opinion, but I think with either one, you'd be ok rounding on patients in a hospital but to work in the actual hospital full time, you'd have to do your research into the hospitals in your area. While some hospitals have no problem hiring FNPs to work, some hospitals are shying away from them and starting to only hire AGACNPs.

Oh, and there's the AOCNP certification exam that you can take once you're an NP

https://www.oncc.org/certifications/advanced-oncology-certified-nurse-practitioner-aocnp

I used to work in a hospital in New Hampshire and we had inpatient onc NPs at our unit; one is an FNP and the other one is a AGPCNP. I also know an AGACNP but she’s working outpatient onc, so it makes things a little bit confusing for me to research. It does look like in NH as long as you’re an NP you can work at any setting. I’m working inpatient onc in Massachusetts now and I don’t see NPs working inpatient at all; only PAs. Most NPs in Mass that I know work outpatient. I know NPs in Mass don’t have as much authority as NPs in New Hampshire so maybe that’s why I’ve only seen PAs inpatient. I’m still not sure yet if I want to do inpatient or outpatient onc but I’m leaning towards the Primary care program. 

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