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Southern California NP schools

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by epark46 epark46 (New) New Nurse Pre-Student

50 Profile Views; 9 Posts

Hi everyone,

I recently got accepted to USC, UCLA, and possibly CSULB for their FNP programs. Other than the cost, what were some reasons you guys chose a certain school? Has anyone here completed the FNP program at any of the schools? I'd love some insight and how classes/professors/clinicals were. Thanks in advance!

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

9 Followers; 2 Articles; 1,137 Posts; 10,658 Profile Views

Congratulations!

UCLA is the best school. The USC program is pretty new.

As far as cost, see what kind of financial aid you get from each. USC is the most expensive, as it is a private school. Don't forget to consider cost of living. Long Beach used to be cheaper than LA, but I don't know if that is still true.

Best wishes!

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643 Posts; 11,104 Profile Views

Congratulations. I live and work in California but attended a distance program for the schedule flexibility (there's nothing like "attending class" at 0400 before going to work, sitting in my underpants) and time factor (those of us who live/lived in So Cal know the notorious traffic situation). I also chose the school that I did because at the time it was offering a certification in the specialty that I wanted to work in. Those were my two primary reasons.

I can't speak to USC or CSULB's programs but one thing I really like about UCLA is that it has an oncology specialty track. Plus, I know a lot of great NPs who graduated from there.

I was peeved at my school for not providing clinical sites but when I asked the NPs at my previous job who went to school in California if they were provided clinical placement, the grand majority of them said no.

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umbdude has 3 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Psych/Mental Health.

2 Followers; 1,030 Posts; 14,680 Profile Views

UCLA is, I think by far, the best choice. UCLA nursing is well-established, highly regarded, and likely has a ton of resources for students. CSULB is a solid school and probably quite affordable.

USC does not have a School of Nursing. Instead, its FNP program falls under the School of Social Work, which would not be acceptable to me. Nothing against social work, but there's already too much psychosocial component in nursing..I wouldn't want the curriculum to be taught from (or influenced by) a social work point of view. Also, it's insanely expensive (~$95k).

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On 3/26/2020 at 9:13 PM, FullGlass said:

Congratulations!

UCLA is the best school. The USC program is pretty new.

As far as cost, see what kind of financial aid you get from each. USC is the most expensive, as it is a private school. Don't forget to consider cost of living. Long Beach used to be cheaper than LA, but I don't know if that is still true.

Best wishes!

I read your posts and thought your responses were thorough and helpful. I get quite confused with so much vague or differing information/answers. I want to clear some questions I have regarding MSN programs and pathways to becoming a Nurse Practioner. I'm confused because Azusa Pacific has some specialty in their elm program however Charles Drew ELM is not as informing and only states that it prepares students for Public Health Nurse (PHN) Certificate.

I have a Bachelors of science and currently trying to decide which route is best. I can save money and go 2 years ADN+1 Year BSN CSULA COOP program, or spend almost 100K for an ELM program (2years).

What are my options, and what are the strengths, weaknesses, limitations of each option? I was assuming APRN would be within reach with any Masters degree, I'm pretty sure I'm wrong and would appreciate your first hand knowledge, expertise, and advice.TY GOD BLESS

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RN_518 has 11 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Ortho, Med-Surg, Tele, PCU, IMC, ICU.

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I got accepted into CSUSM's FNP and USC's FNP program for Fall 2020. CSUSM is a public school whereas USC is a private university. I need help making a decision. Obv, USC has more prestige but is very costly at 90K+ and CSUSM is comparatively cheaper than USC. Would it matter if I went to CSUSM versus USC. BTW, I did attend CSUSM for my BSN degree. I estimated the cost for attending CSUSM to be around 40-50K. Not sure if it's a good time to be going back to school with this corona virus pandemic. Perhaps, I should wait a year and reapply for school and save more money. Please advise and Thank you.

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

9 Followers; 2 Articles; 1,137 Posts; 10,658 Profile Views

3 hours ago, RN_518 said:

I got accepted into CSUSM's FNP and USC's FNP program for Fall 2020. CSUSM is a public school whereas USC is a private university. I need help making a decision. Obv, USC has more prestige but is very costly at 90K+ and CSUSM is comparatively cheaper than USC. Would it matter if I went to CSUSM versus USC. BTW, I did attend CSUSM for my BSN degree. I estimated the cost for attending CSUSM to be around 40-50K. Not sure if it's a good time to be going back to school with this corona virus pandemic. Perhaps, I should wait a year and reapply for school and save more money. Please advise and Thank you.

No, it doesn't matter. USC does not have a well-established NP program. Go to CSUSM and save some money.

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9 Posts; 50 Profile Views

I agree with FullGlass. USC definitely has gathered some good leadership from top universities, but I don't think it's worth that tuition to go to a school that is not established yet. I would hate to be a guinea pig.

Thank you everyone for your replies!! It was very helpful

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

9 Followers; 2 Articles; 1,137 Posts; 10,658 Profile Views

On 3/29/2020 at 10:43 AM, 80zbaby said:

I read your posts and thought your responses were thorough and helpful. I get quite confused with so much vague or differing information/answers. I want to clear some questions I have regarding MSN programs and pathways to becoming a Nurse Practioner. I'm confused because Azusa Pacific has some specialty in their elm program however Charles Drew ELM is not as informing and only states that it prepares students for Public Health Nurse (PHN) Certificate.

I have a Bachelors of science and currently trying to decide which route is best. I can save money and go 2 years ADN+1 Year BSN CSULA COOP program, or spend almost 100K for an ELM program (2years).

What are my options, and what are the strengths, weaknesses, limitations of each option? I was assuming APRN would be within reach with any Masters degree, I'm pretty sure I'm wrong and would appreciate your first hand knowledge, expertise, and advice.TY GOD BLESS

Since you already have a Bachelor's degree, you have a couple of different ways to become an NP.

1. Yes, you can go the ADN route, then BSN, then into an MSN NP program. This is the least expensive option. The only possible downside is that in many parts of the country, there are waiting lists to get into ADN programs - check to see if this is true in your area.

2. There are still a few Accelerated BSN programs around for people who already have a Bachelor's degree in a non-nursing field. These typically last 12 to 18 months. (I would not advise 12 months - too much cramming). After graduating, you could then attend an MSN NP program.

3. Many schools are now offering a direct-entry MSN program for people with a Bachelor's degree in a non-nursing field. You would earn an MSN, but this would only qualify you for an RN position. You still have to go to an NP school after this.

My advice is to apply to several different schools and programs. Some private schools have great financial aid, so they wouldn't cost more than a public school. So apply and see what kind of aid you get.

There are also Scholarships available from other sources - use the internet to research Scholarship and loan programs. There federal programs that offer full-ride scholarships to NP students through HRSA and some BSN scholarships. Many states have an equivalent program for their residents.

There are also loan repayment programs (NOT forgiveness) through the federal and many state governments, as well as some employers.

Don't hesitate to call the schools you are interested in and talk to an admissions counselor. Many schools also have webinars for interested applicants, so sign up for those.

Best wishes.

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