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Social Interacting, work and becoming an RN

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by scott.andrew scott.andrew (New Member) New Member

987 Visitors; 15 Posts

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Hello I am starting the journey of becoming an RN. It is something I have wanted to do for a long time.

I have a few questions for anyone who would help.

Just a little background info, I have a little baby girl, and a wonderful wife who is very supportive.

I have a degree in graphic design and business, so I am used to school and studying, and I am fairly good at it. I made a 4.0 with my business degree.

Well to start things off, I have always been an introvert. Public speaking and social interaction can be very painful for me, before I have had a chance to warm up. I have worked furiously to overcome this, and I have greatly improved in this area. People have told me before they got to know me, they thought I was insecure,arrogant or stuck-up. But after meeting and getting to know me, they told me that I was a really great and loving kind of guy. I do have a passion for caring for people.

Well my question is, do you think this issue of mine will hinder me as an RN?

Also, do schools offer employment for students that are working towards an RN degree, because I will have to quit my job to fit to got to schoo, and I will need to provide for my familyl?

Also math was never a strong point for me, will this be a big problem?

And one last question, what are some pro's and con's of being a male nurse?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, I would love to hear from anyone who would kindly offer me some wisdom.

sincerely

scott

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mazy works as a LPN.

8,978 Visitors; 932 Posts

I can't tell you anything about being a male nurse but working with them I can say that they bring a different and welcome perspective and energy to the job.

I am an introvert and while I fall to pieces when dealing with large groups I do very well with the one-on-one, which is a real strength when you are doing direct patient care. I have to go to a party today and I have been fretting about it for a week -- I'm pretty sure the intentions of the party planners was not for me to lose a lot of sleep over it, but that's the way it goes...

The job market is tight and that might be a problem while you are in school, have you talked to the school about what they have to offer for students? Have you considered working as a CNA while in school? It's only a couple of weeks of study and you'll at least be getting some experience in healthcare.

The math can be a challenge, but it is really basic math and some algebra and most schools offer tutoring services.

I guess the only thing I can say is make sure you have all your ducks in a row before you start school -- which it sounds like you are working on, so you're on the right track. Nursing school is a challenge under the best of circumstances and life does have a way of throwing curveballs when you least expect it.

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netglow works as a RN.

33,507 Visitors; 4,412 Posts

Well Scott, I don't think being "chatty" is really something you need a lot of in nursing school, or in nursing in general. I don't think there is much time for it. When you are with a patient, you need to be a good listener, and you must be able to pass on information to that person/other staff re treatment etc.

The math is chemistry math. get that one basic down an there's your nursing math.

If you are needing to be a substantial bread winner for your family, I think you might run into a problem. Much depends on where you end up going to school. I worked FT outside of my previous profession while taking my prereqs. I have another degree as well. This other thing I did, of course would absolutely not jive with going back to school. So, I worked for a doc and saved money, lived poor till I eventually had to give that up as well once FT in nursing school - I simply would not be able to be with him as much as he needed me to. My college did have day and night sections, but would not let you move to the other if you needed to change. You could look to see if loans are available, if you did not take them the first go around. Employee tuition reimbursement is dwindling at many places now because of the economy, and so are jobs for new graduates. You could still try to work as a tech, and see if you can get the hours you need. Be prepared, you will make very little money as a tech. I would research the availability of tuition reimbursement if you choose to try a hospital. You might do as I did, you have a business degree and can run much of a practice like I did. Less physical strain on you, and you might get your health insurance, etc. if you can find a doc who is willing to be flexible with you.

Take time and really see what you're up against. You are wise to come here and ask us before you jump. :up:

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happy2learn works as a Employed at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

7,751 Visitors; 1,118 Posts

well my question is, do you think this issue of mine will hinder me as an rn?

i think as long as you provide good care, and aren't flat out rude or nasty to them for no reason at all, then you should be fine. no one expects you to listen to their life story, as you won't have time.

also, do schools offer employment for students that are working towards an rn degree, because i will have to quit my job to fit to got to schoo, and i will need to provide for my familyl?

like work-study? work study is offered to all students, not just nursing students, and the pay is usually horrible, like $8 an hour. you may want to look into becoming a cna or pca and get hired at a hospital, if any jobs are available. are you sure you have to quit your job? many schools tell people they have to quit, when really, they don't. many people work while going to school.

also math was never a strong point for me, will this be a big problem?

you may have to take stats, if you haven't, but you don't need to be a genius in math if that is what you're wondering.

and one last question, what are some pro's and con's of being a male nurse?

there is a forum for male nurses on here. you may want to check it out.

any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, i would love to hear from anyone who would kindly offer me some wisdom.

sincerely

scott

good luck to you!

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8,370 Visitors; 839 Posts

Speaking as an introvert myself, it won't hinder you at all.

I'm shy in new situations and around new people, but I open up as I become more comfortable and confident. I also started out in the ER, where it does a nurse good to be assertive and confident. I was meek and intimidated at first, but I picked it up soon enough. ;)

Frankly, quiet, studious, and hardworking are qualities I think that should be valued in a nurse. Loud, gabby, and too much socializing are not good things while working.

You'll be fine!

Also, pros of being a male nurse, instant increase in respect from MDs. It's amazing what having a penis does...

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JustEnuff2BDangerous has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Medical-Surgical/Oncology floor.

1 Article; 4,208 Visitors; 137 Posts

I'm also an introvert, and do not feel that it has hindered me at all in my profession; in fact I think being a nurse has actually helped me be more outgoing and "openly" friendly, because you deal with strangers on a daily basis. It has forced me outside of my box and, while I'm still an introvert, I feel I can deal with people comfortably where before I would have been anxious about new things.

I'm also terribly awful in math. I struggled through college algebra (a prereq) with the help of my now-husband, and kind of flapped my way through probability and statistics (also a prereq). The only math in actual nursing school is dosage calculation and I, surprisingly, consistently rocked this.. I had the highest test average in dosage calc of my class. Can't do geometry or trig to save my life, but I can do dosage calc to save yours, and that's all that matters as a nurse. No patient is going to come in with a diagnosis that is dependent on your ability to solve for 3x(42-y) - 59z. :p

I wish you the best of luck on your journey and remember you can always come here for some moral support. :)

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9,128 Visitors; 672 Posts

The math you need as a nurse is very basic, simple algebra. If you are uncomfortable even with that once you start working it is usually not difficult to identify the "resources" on your unit. Seek them out, ask their advice and learn from them.

I can't tell you the advantages of being a male nurse other than we generally like to work with you. Men bring a different vibe to the work environment that is often refreshing in a female dominated area. Be prepared to be asked to lift/reach things. And if you want to make friends do this graciously. :)

I am rather introverted as well, although you could probably never tell at work. I've found something that I love to do and am passionate about. :redpinkhe I want to teach my patients, talk to them, understand where they are coming from and help them. I want to learn about my coworkers, their strengths and weaknesses and assist them in any way I can. I have found my inner leader, people come to me for advice and support. They have allowed me to precept new nurses and students which I consider a tremendous honor. My supervisor and DON have allowed me to run a committee completely unsupervised and completely supported. You may feel introverted now, but sometimes when you find your niche it just feels like home. Just be open minded and keep your eyes open for the right fit and I don't think you will have to worry about your introversion.

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987 Visitors; 15 Posts

I can't tell you anything about being a male nurse but working with them I can say that they bring a different and welcome perspective and energy to the job.

I am an introvert and while I fall to pieces when dealing with large groups I do very well with the one-on-one, which is a real strength when you are doing direct patient care. I have to go to a party today and I have been fretting about it for a week -- I'm pretty sure the intentions of the party planners was not for me to lose a lot of sleep over it, but that's the way it goes...

The job market is tight and that might be a problem while you are in school, have you talked to the school about what they have to offer for students? Have you considered working as a CNA while in school? It's only a couple of weeks of study and you'll at least be getting some experience in healthcare.

The math can be a challenge, but it is really basic math and some algebra and most schools offer tutoring services.

I guess the only thing I can say is make sure you have all your ducks in a row before you start school -- which it sounds like you are working on, so you're on the right track. Nursing school is a challenge under the best of circumstances and life does have a way of throwing curveballs when you least expect it.

Thank you so much for replying, the information was helpful. There are a lot of points that I need to consider. I am going to get some information about becoming a CNA.

-scott

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987 Visitors; 15 Posts

Well Scott, I don't think being "chatty" is really something you need a lot of in nursing school, or in nursing in general. I don't think there is much time for it. When you are with a patient, you need to be a good listener, and you must be able to pass on information to that person/other staff re treatment etc.

The math is chemistry math. get that one basic down an there's your nursing math.

If you are needing to be a substantial bread winner for your family, I think you might run into a problem. Much depends on where you end up going to school. I worked FT outside of my previous profession while taking my prereqs. I have another degree as well. This other thing I did, of course would absolutely not jive with going back to school. So, I worked for a doc and saved money, lived poor till I eventually had to give that up as well once FT in nursing school - I simply would not be able to be with him as much as he needed me to. My college did have day and night sections, but would not let you move to the other if you needed to change. You could look to see if loans are available, if you did not take them the first go around. Employee tuition reimbursement is dwindling at many places now because of the economy, and so are jobs for new graduates. You could still try to work as a tech, and see if you can get the hours you need. Be prepared, you will make very little money as a tech. I would research the availability of tuition reimbursement if you choose to try a hospital. You might do as I did, you have a business degree and can run much of a practice like I did. Less physical strain on you, and you might get your health insurance, etc. if you can find a doc who is willing to be flexible with you.

Take time and really see what you're up against. You are wise to come here and ask us before you jump. :up:

Dear 2ndwind,

thank you so much for your thoughts and information, I am so appreciative. I think you have spelled out probably one of the biggest obstacles in my journey, and that is working while i am going to school. The classes that are offered where i am currently living are only during the day. We might possibly be moving near my wife's Father, and there are school's with tuition reimbursement. But the work question still looms.

You have given me some food for thought.

Thank you again very much.

sincerely

-scott

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987 Visitors; 15 Posts

Good luck to you!

Thank you so much for the information, reading it is actually quite comforting.

As far as my work question, the local schools/colleges only offer day classes on RN study courses, and there are no evening or night shifts at my current job. So I am going to look into becoming a CNA or a PCA.

Thanks again for the info, and I am going to look into the Male Forum list

sincerely

-scott

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987 Visitors; 15 Posts

The math you need as a nurse is very basic, simple algebra. If you are uncomfortable even with that once you start working it is usually not difficult to identify the "resources" on your unit. Seek them out, ask their advice and learn from them.

I can't tell you the advantages of being a male nurse other than we generally like to work with you. Men bring a different vibe to the work environment that is often refreshing in a female dominated area. Be prepared to be asked to lift/reach things. And if you want to make friends do this graciously. :)

I am rather introverted as well, although you could probably never tell at work. I've found something that I love to do and am passionate about. :redpinkhe I want to teach my patients, talk to them, understand where they are coming from and help them. I want to learn about my coworkers, their strengths and weaknesses and assist them in any way I can. I have found my inner leader, people come to me for advice and support. They have allowed me to precept new nurses and students which I consider a tremendous honor. My supervisor and DON have allowed me to run a committee completely unsupervised and completely supported. You may feel introverted now, but sometimes when you find your niche it just feels like home. Just be open minded and keep your eyes open for the right fit and I don't think you will have to worry about your introversion.

Thank you for your reply, it has given me a much needed encouragement. All the red tape has gotten me a littel discouraged. But I think in the long run, it will be a nice fit.

thanks again.

sincerely

-scott

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987 Visitors; 15 Posts

I'm also an introvert, and do not feel that it has hindered me at all in my profession; in fact I think being a nurse has actually helped me be more outgoing and "openly" friendly, because you deal with strangers on a daily basis. It has forced me outside of my box and, while I'm still an introvert, I feel I can deal with people comfortably where before I would have been anxious about new things.

I'm also terribly awful in math. I struggled through college algebra (a prereq) with the help of my now-husband, and kind of flapped my way through probability and statistics (also a prereq). The only math in actual nursing school is dosage calculation and I, surprisingly, consistently rocked this.. I had the highest test average in dosage calc of my class. Can't do geometry or trig to save my life, but I can do dosage calc to save yours, and that's all that matters as a nurse. No patient is going to come in with a diagnosis that is dependent on your ability to solve for 3x(42-y) - 59z. :p

I wish you the best of luck on your journey and remember you can always come here for some moral support. :)

I am so new to all of this, and to this web site.

but it seems great, and thank you so much for your information and encouragement.

sincerely

-scott

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