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So we have enough nurses nursing supervisor, really?

Nurses   (1,686 Views | 19 Replies)

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NurseSpeedy has 18 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN.

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On 11/15/2019 at 9:54 AM, kp2016 said:

Interesting side note. From multiple posts i've read here, The high cost of recruiting and training new nurses is often used as the reason that nurses are forced to sign a penalty clause $$ if they quit within X time frame. It would seem that you have a point. Measures to improve nursing retention like I don't know staffing appropriately would save them money long term.

It would be a cold day in hell before I’d work for a company that forces me to sign a contact to work for them. Red flag they are hell to work for.

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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When my unit had enough CNAs I didn't mind having 4 vent patients (ICU Stepdown). What was awful was when we had 4 critically ill patients, no unit secretary and had to cover the call light, and no CNAs. The unit had 31 beds. We called for 11 nurses when full, but often had 6-7. At least we got double EP for picking up when short.

 

I got a 10,000 sign on bonus for 2 years at my old job, but I could quit and give back the bonus so it wasn't really binding in my eyes.

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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kp2016 has 20 years experience.

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6 hours ago, ArmyRntoMD said:

When my unit had enough CNAs I didn't mind having 4 vent patients (ICU Stepdown). What was awful was when we had 4 critically ill patients, no unit secretary and had to cover the call light, and no CNAs. The unit had 31 beds. We called for 11 nurses when full, but often had 6-7. At least we got double EP for picking up when short.

 

I got a 10,000 sign on bonus for 2 years at my old job, but I could quit and give back the bonus so it wasn't really binding in my eyes.

I think part of the problem is a lot of nurses are in no position to give back the money which effectively leaves them trapped. I imagine this isn't news to the hospitals, seems a little predatory to me.

I have never personally taken a sign on bonus or signed any sort of contract that had a penalty for me resigning. I've been offered a bonus/ relocation incentive a few times but always stayed away from them. I've had enough jobs to know I never want to be in a position where I can't resign and walk away. Knowing I could quit anytime I wanted too was all that got me through some shifts.

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5 hours ago, kp2016 said:

I think part of the problem is a lot of nurses are in no position to give back the money which effectively leaves them trapped. I imagine this isn't news to the hospitals, seems a little predatory to me.

I have never personally taken a sign on bonus or signed any sort of contract that had a penalty for me resigning. I've been offered a bonus/ relocation incentive a few times but always stayed away from them. I've had enough jobs to know I never want to be in a position where I can't resign and walk away. Knowing I could quit anytime I wanted too was all that got me through some shifts.

Interesting point of view, nurses may be less likely to leave if they had enough help. Being short-staffed can be the straw that breaks the camels back and what ends up happening is nurses keep job hopping, most likely finding out that many places are the same.

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Nursie_C has 15 years experience and specializes in onc/nero/LTC.

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On 11/17/2019 at 1:06 AM, Jedrnurse said:

Is there anything else I can help you with...I have the time!

YEP!! Haha! THIS, exactly! ugh, and make sure you update that white board!!

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NurseSpeedy has 18 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN.

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3 hours ago, Nursie_C said:

YEP!! Haha! THIS, exactly! ugh, and make sure you update that white board!!

I completely forgot about those stupid white boards-the ones completely across the room that the patient can’t even see because their glasses are either at home or haven’t been updated to the correct script in 20 years.

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NurseSpeedy has 18 years experience as a ADN, LPN, RN.

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On 11/18/2019 at 8:44 AM, Workitinurfava said:

Interesting point of view, nurses may be less likely to leave if they had enough help. Being short-staffed can be the straw that breaks the camels back and what ends up happening is nurses keep job hopping, most likely finding out that many places are the same.

The supervisors should work the floor for a week with the staffing they provide their employees-only then will they know why they cannot keep staff and have a high turnover rate. It will also give them the answers for why nurses aren’t getting out on time. Wear the shoes, do the job, and all their questions will be answered-FAST.

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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11 minutes ago, NurseSpeedy said:

I completely forgot about those stupid white boards-the ones completely across the room that the patient can’t even see because their glasses are either at home or haven’t been updated to the correct script in 20 years.

My nursing supervisor gives me the smallest raise because of dumb sh like that. Oh well lol. I got more important things to do like make sure my patients are medically taken care of. 

 

But i I have gotten the hospital award for patient satisfaction twice. Because instead of interacting with them the bare minimum I put in solid time and help them understand what’s going on. 

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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