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Should I still become nurse after...in recovery...?

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dontwory dontwory (New) New

Hello fellow recovering addicts!

I am considering finishing up my pre-requisites for a BSN in nursing. However, I am a bit concerned about jeprodizing my recovery. I am a year and a half clean from a four year battle with opiods. Mainly oxy, but whatever kept me going. I have been doing realy well though, and I was even able to help my dad out with surgery and give him his medication (morphine) with no problems, aside from the little voice that I told to shut up a couple times.

I realy want to help people, and I think nursing would be a good fit, but I think the fact that there is a sectiong on this forum for recovering nurses speaks for itself.

So, do you guys feel that once you have a solid base for recovery you do all right. Also, were most of you guys users befor nursing, or a while after you started.

Thanks

shugrr22107NA

Specializes in HH, SNF, LTC, Hospital. Has 2 years experience.

I would talk to my sponsor, start out slow, with a PT school schedule, make sure I had time for my meetings and pray, pray, pray on it.

Ask your Higher Power to show you the answer and be as open as possible with your network about where you are and how you're feeling so that if you're sliding into an old pattern, you'd have the network to pull you back before it's too late...

Be blessed.

~Shugg

:)

If you get further along in some solid recovery, i encourage you to pursue your nursing dream. You say you have a year and half clean, thats a pretty good start. ive got four years clean now am looking foward to going back to work as an LPN soon. just waiting on my fingerprint clearance card now.my addiction was rolling at full speed prior to entering nursing school, all the way through nursing school, out the other end and into employment all high as a kite. This is by no means something to brag about. and thankgoodness I did hit a bottom without harming any patients. Only harmed myself. did a voluntary surrender and fully sunk into recovery. I feel now that I have a certain edge or avdantage now as a recovering nurse. I feel strengthened in my compassion for others. I recommend getting with your higher power and surround yourself with people who will lift you up and support you. you can do it!!!

jesa

Specializes in ED.

I think you have a good base, and I think that by the time you actually become a nurse you will have a great base! I believe that as people in recovery, we have insight into some things that normies don't. I work in the ED. yesterday I had a patient come in after doing crank for 3 days straight. while most of my co-workers would've cared for him the best they could, they also most likely wouldn't have been able to talk to him in the language WE use. I also went to the computer and printed out a list of NA meetings for him in the area he lived in. I encouraged him to get to a meeting that day and introduce himself to one person. I don't know if he did, but I love my job because I love being able to do that and if one person in 100 takes my suggestion it will be well worth it!

I have eight and a half years in recovery, but as I've heard in meetings a million times the person with the most sobriety is the person who woke up earliest that day. we each have just today, and as long as you take it a day at a time you will be fantastic! we've been through so much, we have so much compassion, empathy, and love, I think people in recovery make awesome nurses!! good luck!

Magsulfate, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 13 years experience.

You MUST have a very solid recovery. Solid. And also be very dedicated to both your recovery and to nursing school. Recovery comes first of course. If you do decide to pursue nursing, come back here often, or find support groups of recovering healthcare workers near you. This is a must!

Pray on it,, think about it... give it time..

SassyErRn

Specializes in ER. Has 3 years experience.

Like the previous posters said...you must have a solid recovery before doing this...but you can do it. Nursing school is very demanding but recovery needs to come first. Find meetings you love and make sure you get to them every week. Make calls often and keep in contact with your HP. There is so much support out there that makes this possible for you to do! Good luck!

Thanks Guys.

I have been in college for a year as well, so that is realy not a problem. It has acualy helped me to have something that I am working for. At least I know that I am not the only one.

Jesa- I think that you make a good point. I might even be able to help "drug seekers," where as some may not realize there is a problem.

For now I just plan to keep doing what i'm doing. I plan to let the idea of nursing marinate for a while. I figure that if I still want to do it after shadowing some nurses, then I will.

subee, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 48 years experience.

Thanks Guys.

I have been in college for a year as well, so that is realy not a problem. It has acualy helped me to have something that I am working for. At least I know that I am not the only one.

Jesa- I think that you make a good point. I might even be able to help "drug seekers," where as some may not realize there is a problem.

For now I just plan to keep doing what i'm doing. I plan to let the idea of nursing marinate for a while. I figure that if I still want to do it after shadowing some nurses, then I will.

Marinating, a wise move. I used to have a book about addictions in nursing called "I'm Dying to Help You." Wanting to "help people" can be expressed in so many other ways than nursing. Addictions counselor comes to mind. No, it may not be as versatile as nursing but would be a safer option. This is not to say that nursing is not for you - I wouldn't have any idea of the answer - but you do. How much stress can you handle? When you're new and in clinicals and getting your first job - the stress is actually painful. Are you really, really uncomfortable with a full bladder or when you're hungry? Yep, gotta work with those conditions all the time. Of course you don't have to work in those kinds of environments forever, but certainly getting to that easier job happens after all the hurdles are jumped. You will be asked about any addiction treatment on all licensing and/or job applications

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