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Serious Question-newborn

Ob/Gyn   (745 Views | 3 Replies)

Kayla Ackert has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN.

226 Profile Views; 8 Posts

I work in a small unit. We do labor and delivery and post partum care in the same rooms. 10 beds.

My question is about newborn care. One of the newborns born about 12 hours ago was spitting up in the nursery while she was getting ready to do the hearing screen and hep B vaccine. A veteran nurse told the nurse caring for the newborn (she is 21 and a new grad no kids of her own) to use a sweetie and give the entire thing to her so it will induce more vomiting to get the gunk out of her so she can quit throwing up. ???????????? I am coming from a mothers point of view on this and saying NO. absolutely not. Did they ask the parents if that was okay to do or not? (no they didn't)

 I get the concept behind it but I do not agree that is acceptable practice! What do you guys think? How would you respond to this? Thanks in advance.

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,573 Posts; 119,363 Profile Views

No, absolutely not. Holy cow. Unacceptable.

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LibraSunCNM has 10 years experience as a MSN and specializes in OB.

1,423 Posts; 26,121 Profile Views

Uh, no.  But I'm not overly surprised.  Being brutally honest, "veteran" nursery/postpartum nurses are some of the most stuck-in-their-ways nurses that I have ever met in my career.  Newborn care and protocols have changed drastically in the last few decades, yet I've found nurses from this particular area to be particularly resistant to evidence-based changes.  Not trying to paint everyone with a broad brush, just what I've experienced.  

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passionflower has 28 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OB, Women’s health, Educator, Leadership.

220 Posts; 7,281 Profile Views

How about informing the pediatrician of your assessment findings.  Vomiting can be an impending sign of more serious complications. 

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