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Rudeness in the Workplace

Nurses Article   (11,867 Views | 25 Replies | 1,084 Words)

Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

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No one likes it when they think they've been disrespected or someone has been rude to them. Rudeness in the workplace disrupts patient care and relationships between colleagues. Sometimes, though, what is perceived as rudeness is a misunderstanding or miscommunication. If we all assumed the best of one another instead of immediately jumping to the worst possible conclusion, perhaps "rudeness" would have a far smaller impact on our interpersonal relationships. You are reading page 2 of Rudeness in the Workplace. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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One of our MDs from a private practice yelled at me in front of at least 10-15 people that were coming and going through the nurses station. Talking about unit secretaries, MDs, RNs, CNAs, etc because the IV antibiotic that I hanged did not go through when it should have. I plead guilty for neglecting to check and make sure the meds infused when it should have, BUT MD could have put me aside in private and cuss me out till I melt. I can take loosing my license because I was definitely in the wrong, but public humiliation was just unbearable.

Can MDs get away with treating me this way? I have only been in practice for a year and felt so vulnerable. I spoke to my clinical supervisor about the whole incident and cried my eyes out about how upset I still am for the way that MD humiliated me. I am now looking for another job, hopefully not a RN position.

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nerdtonurse? is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Telemetry.

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I've had experiences with a new nurse who used to be a CNA and now thinks she's God. She's rude, when you try to help her with something (like getting her to sign off blood slips before she leaves) she gives attitude, "I know how to do that!" -- well, no, you don't, that's why I'm showing you problem x, y and z. Last night she did it to me. So....rather than start screaming or just strangle her in the middle of the nurse's station, which was what I wanted to do, I just walked away. And Miss Priss had better realize that while I won't let her harm a patient, I'm not going to correct her mistakes anymore; I'll just leave it for her preceptor on dayshift to sort out. I'm not going to waste my time trying to help someone who doesn't want to learn because 3 glorious weeks post licensure, they apparently know it all already. When I was new, I was grateful for help, asked questions, asked for feedback -- if I messed up, I wanted someone to tell me and I didn't do it twice. There were some people who were mean and hateful, there are anywhere, but my god, when you're a new nurse and you're snapping at people who've been nurses 4 years that are trying to help you? Are you crazy?

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eriksoln has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary.

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I've had experiences with a new nurse who used to be a CNA and now thinks she's God. She's rude, when you try to help her with something (like getting her to sign off blood slips before she leaves) she gives attitude, "I know how to do that!" -- well, no, you don't, that's why I'm showing you problem x, y and z. Last night she did it to me. So....rather than start screaming or just strangle her in the middle of the nurse's station, which was what I wanted to do, I just walked away. And Miss Priss had better realize that while I won't let her harm a patient, I'm not going to correct her mistakes anymore; I'll just leave it for her preceptor on dayshift to sort out. I'm not going to waste my time trying to help someone who doesn't want to learn because 3 glorious weeks post licensure, they apparently know it all already. When I was new, I was grateful for help, asked questions, asked for feedback -- if I messed up, I wanted someone to tell me and I didn't do it twice. There were some people who were mean and hateful, there are anywhere, but my god, when you're a new nurse and you're snapping at people who've been nurses 4 years that are trying to help you? Are you crazy?

Yep. You did it right. Some people never learn until they are left to drown a few times on their own.

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GadgetRN71 has 14 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Operating Room.

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I basically agree with the article but still don't think snapping at someone because you have a rough personal life should be tolerated. We're professionals and everyone has it rough at some point. Some people use it as a crutch too, meaning, they ALWAYS have something bad happening to them.

If people would just think before mouthing off, a lot of the grief could be avoided.

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No Stars In My Eyes has 43 years experience and specializes in Med nurse in med-surg., float, HH, and PDN.

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I'm sitting in a charting station, minding my own bizz, leaning my head onto my left hand, so I'm facing the wall while I'm writing. No one else around but the ward clerk on the other side of the desk. Doc's traditionally sit in this area, but it's not exclusive to/for them. A big-shot cardiologist comes in and drops 5 fat charts on the desk not six inches from me, but I don't react until he walks out the door (without putting any of the charts back, by the way). As he cleared the doorway, I said, quite audibly, to the ward clerk, "Who WAS that menopausal doctor?!!" She looked at me bug-eyed, twitching her head in the direction the doc had gone, indicating he was right there and had heard me. But, you know, anytime he saw me after that, he'd smile!

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39 Posts; 2,968 Profile Views

Cutting people alot of slack and "NOT TAKING ANYTHING PERSONALLY" has been the best attitude I've adopted. There can be a million reasons why someone is acting rude and off their game and all those million reasons most times have nothing to do with me.

So why should I be nice to someone who is being rude and short with me?

Simply because we all have our days and I know how it feels.

But thats how I see things in my world and it works for me

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PostOpPrincess has 19 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in M/S, MICU, CVICU, SICU, ER, Trauma, NICU.

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Because people allow themselves to get easily offended instead of investigating and reflecting, AND clarifying. The best thing to do is zippa da lippa...

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sakura_RN specializes in Med. Surg, physician's office.

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Not to be trite, but as a person who tries every which way possible to not step on anybody's toes, how can I learn to NOT take things personally?? It's extremely difficult and for me, I've been criticized by my family my whole life, its kinda hard when there's any type of yelling or attitude from somebody else, whether its miscommunication or not, it stays in my mind all day and basically ruins my day. So again, how do you NOT take it personally????

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deezRN has 15 years experience.

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I know exactly what you mean....and when you try so so hard to always do everything exactly right, and then have someone seem to attack you out of nowhere, that is so very hard to handle. When a colleague does it, at least you feel like there is something that you can do, but when it's a patient, or their family that does it, you feel absolutely helpless.

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timetoshine has 54 years experience and specializes in Acute Care Hosp, Nursing Home, Clinics.

2 Articles; 74 Posts; 3,599 Profile Views

You just say to yourself "Forgive them Father for they no not what they do".

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timetoshine has 54 years experience and specializes in Acute Care Hosp, Nursing Home, Clinics.

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" So how do you tell a 27 year old that no one wants to eat lunch with her because her table manners are so atrocious without being accused of "eating your young." I'll confess that I couldn't manage it. "

Although it's hard to believe a 27 year old professional nurse could be so obtuse I guess it could happen. You could try taking her aside and telling her she has a problem. Gently of course. Nursing is the gentle art of Nursing is it not? About your friend and her husband. It is truly unfortunate and she should be given every consideration but snapping at her husband's nurse or anyone else is not one of them. About the nurse who asked for help when you clearly were off the clock, you could have just said "Sorry Honey I'm off the clock". Then you wouldn't need to explain your cranky behavior to your Manager. About the three way conversation with people with southern and foreign accents how long did it take? How much effort did it take? How lucky they were you were there to

give some help. Sounds more like you were more annoyed than understanding of people struggling to communicate in a difficult situation. Maybe you need to Raise The Bar of your expectations. Just saying. Rudeness in the workplace is never O.K. It's not about being perfect. It's about being considerate. It's about staying focused on the job and what you can do to make it better because you are doing it.

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timetoshine has 54 years experience and specializes in Acute Care Hosp, Nursing Home, Clinics.

2 Articles; 74 Posts; 3,599 Profile Views

NerdtoNurse Instead of correcting her mistakes you could try pointing to the scene of the crime or taking her there and asking her "What is wrong with this picture?" She will either realize something is wrong and needs to be corrected or she will look at you wide eyed and innocent and say "I don't see anything wrong." Tell her to look again. Be sure to smile, preferably with your eyes (very effective). If she still dosen't get it? Smile again (show lots of teeth this time) and then show her how to correct the problem. Result should be. . . . You took advantage of a teaching opportunity. She learned what she needed to learn. No one was insulted or rude and you should both walk out arm in arm with matching smiling faces.

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