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Reporting abuse against a very rich facility

Nurses   (396 Views | 6 Replies)

718 Profile Views; 45 Posts

I'll try to make this story short, so I helped my gf get her CNA she started working at the richest nursing home in my state.  Come to find out shes always talking about this one CNA that keeps neglecting and verbally abusing the residents.  I helped her report the abuse to HR.  Come to find out they did talk to the abuser and the abuser is also close with their scheduler...

 

Lots of my gf's coworkers would complain about the same thing, the abuser keeps neglecting and verbally abusing residents.  My gf would tell them to report her but the new CNAs are too scared to make a report.  Time goes on and I keep hearing stories of her still repeating the abuse.

 

Also ever since then  my gf said management keeps trying to watch her and they eventually fired her today for no apparent reason.  In her group text for scheduling she made a comment about the abuser should be getting fired and not her and that this will be reported to the state for the facility letting the abuser continue to work there.

 

-I already called the adult abuse hotline and reported the abuser.

-I feel like I need to file a complaint against the facility and make a call to the ombudsman.  I learned in Nursing school that we are to report any type of abuse right away and we are supposed to be patient advocates.

 

However after talking to some of my coworkers some of them said it might be a losing battle because this place is very very rich.  I need your opinions what do you guys think before I make the complaints soon.

-what type of action will they take?

-since this place is very rich, do they have power to jeopardize my license?

 

Edited by JackdLPN

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Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,509 Posts; 80,920 Profile Views

I can commiserate with you, JackdLPN, having been in similar circumstances several times. Fact is, I'm involved in two now, where one staff member in a position of some authority is creating a hostile workplace and giving staff erroneous information on a legal process, and another staff member who, among other things, is providing poor patient care.

A technique I've learned to follow is based on something Edgar Cayce said: "You can't get someone into more trouble than they can get themselves into".

Once the individual's inappropriate behavior has been reported to those who possess the power to remedy the situation, we need to let it go. We can continue to monitor the wrongdoer to assure quality care is provided, but outside of that, it is up to The Fates, God, The Forces That Be, and The Guardians of the Universe to do their job.

This process usually takes a long time, but it will come out in the wash.

As far as your license is concerned, there is no basis for it being jeopardized.

Good luck, JackdLPN!

 

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3 Followers; 37,203 Posts; 99,007 Profile Views

It is a workplace truism that the “favorite” can get away with almost anything. The trick is in assuming anyone you observe to be left of center, is in fact, in cahoots with TPTB, and act accordingly, if you want to keep your job.

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45 Posts; 718 Profile Views

I just contacted the ombudsman today and they said they are going to interview the resident.

 

This is wrong, she reported abuse against a CNA that is close with the scheduler and in retaliation they fired her.

 

We are supposed to be mandatory reporters and must act upon it right away

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beachbabe86 specializes in Oceanfront Living.

64 Posts; 256 Profile Views

Honestly, speaking from years of experience of investigating these types of complaints,...it usually ends up being a contest of  he said she said. Verbal abuse is very difficult to cite.

You are obviously not following your policy about reporting abuse.  All abuse is to be reported to the worker's direct supervisor and kept confidential.

hope this helps 

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Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,509 Posts; 80,920 Profile Views

On 2/13/2020 at 3:59 AM, caliotter3 said:

It is a workplace truism that the “favorite” can get away with almost anything. The trick is in assuming anyone you observe to be left of center, is in fact, in cahoots with TPTB, and act accordingly, if you want to keep your job.

"Truism" is a most appropriate word, caliotter, for this I know. In my experience, there have been numerous situations where those in charge have put personalities before principals and have allowed the rogues to run free. But, as I mentioned before, the wrongdoers have always driven the last nail into their coffins.

On 2/13/2020 at 8:30 PM, JackdLPN said:

This is wrong, she reported abuse against a CNA that is close with the scheduler and in retaliation they fired her.

I sense, JackdLPN, that there may now be a vendetta taking place. We need to be aware of our motives. Are we truly Fighting the Good Fight, or are we merely retaliating against those who have wronged us?

Allowing our heated emotions to come into play in these situations can obscure our sight and come back to bite us in the behind.

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KalipsoRed21 is a BSN and specializes in Currently: Home Health.

239 Posts; 4,735 Profile Views

Well I definitely think you and your gf should report the abuse. I think it is super frustrating to you and your gf that she was fired for ‘doing the right thing.’ 


Calling the abuse hotline was good. You guys took action to try to get those patients some help...good! But I don’t see what going further will get either of you.

It sucks that it happened, it’s sad that they are getting away with it. And likely something really bad is going to have to happen before it gets changed.

Move on. Be sure that when your gf goes to her net interview that she does not talk negatively about her previous employer. Just say that there was some unfortunate, unresolvable differences between the two of them. 
Her next interviewer will be able to check with the previous employer about the terms of her leaving. So they will know she was fired. Best to be honest about it but not discuss it in depth. She could say something like, “ I felt there was a coworker who was being abusive to residents. I took my concerns up with management, unaware that this coworker had family/friend connections, and ultimately they decided the only way to resolve the issue was to get rid of me. But I am passionate about providing a safe and caring environment for my patients and I felt I did the best for them that I could.” Do NOT name names or be more aggressive than that. Spite about how she was mistreated and how unfair this was at her next job will not help her with employment.

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