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Rendering Aid

Nurses   (1,856 Views 9 Comments)
by k.lvn.mom k.lvn.mom (Member)

k.lvn.mom specializes in Alzheimer's Disease, Geriatrics.

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I was wondering what the policy on rendering aid while in nursing school. Nothing medical was performed other than checking pulse and talking to the person. I'm in Texas and I am an LVN student

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NeosynephRN specializes in ICU, PACU, Cath Lab.

564 Posts; 7,313 Profile Views

I am not sure what you mean by policy...but the good samaritan law is there to protect "lay people" when they stop to help someone. If you are comfortable stopping, I would perform very limited help, not above and beyond anything you have been specifically trained to do...like CPR since I assume that you have CPR if you are an nursing student. I am not sure what the "rules" are as the whole time I was in nursing school, I was an EMT, so I could and did render assistance under that training!

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k.lvn.mom specializes in Alzheimer's Disease, Geriatrics.

35 Posts; 1,382 Profile Views

Thanks. I have CNA/Med Aide certs and I am in my last sem of nursing school, so I think that vitals and talking to a pt are within my guidelines. But I was just wondering if there was anything that was completely against the law that i could not do. Like when EMS showed up I left and let them take over, and I was feeling a little guilty about just leaving but there were several other witnesses to provide statements and I know that alot of people around does not help the situation. So i guess I am feeling guilty about leaving the scene, but the lady was awake and drinking H2O, and EMS was there.

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NeosynephRN specializes in ICU, PACU, Cath Lab.

564 Posts; 7,313 Profile Views

As long as you relenquish care to someone that is more trained than you...that is fine. Like I am an EMT-B, so I would hand over care to a paramedic, but not to a first responder. When you are an LPN you will be able to hand over to an RN or Medic, but not a CNA. Do not feel bad, once EMS showes up they have it in hand. I am sure you did a great job making the patient feel better just by being there!

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k.lvn.mom specializes in Alzheimer's Disease, Geriatrics.

35 Posts; 1,382 Profile Views

Thanks

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When I first got out of nursing school and got my first job, I actually found myself in a situation where I had to decide if I should just go on and let the EMS handle it or if I should step in and use my additional knowledge.

Just to make a long story short: they called for a paramedic while I was on an airplane (normally they call for a doctor but they said paramedic so I just kind of ignored it). After I while they called again. I pressed the call button and explained that I was a nurse, and would be able to assist him/her. The paramedic was working on someone by himself who was in full arrest. I went down, started the IV, as well as prepared the AED. Thankfully, this airliner had a full ACLS kit on board!

In any case - if you feel as though you would be of assistance OFFER it do NOT force it if they do not want your help. If someone asks however, you shouldn't refuse.

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DavidNurseEMT has 4 years experience and specializes in ER/Trauma, ICU (All types), CCT.

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Now I am curious, what was the disposition of the patient on the airplane?

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EricJRN has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

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As long as you relenquish care to someone that is more trained than you...that is fine. Like I am an EMT-B, so I would hand over care to a paramedic, but not to a first responder. When you are an LPN you will be able to hand over to an RN or Medic, but not a CNA.

Keep in mind that in most states this concept of transferring to a higher level of care does not apply to off-duty/out-of-jurisdiction situations. Since EMS personnel perform their advanced skills under the offline medical direction of an MD, they usually cannot perform more than BLS/first aid when not working on the ambulance.

I'm an RN and an EMT-Intermediate, but I can't carry IV fluids around or intubate an MVA patient that I happen upon off-duty. My EMS agency's protocols only cover me in situations where I'm on-duty for that specific service. So if I stop somewhere and help at a wreck, I'm essentially acting as a layperson. At least in Texas, I would not have to accompany the patient in the ambulance if only two ECA's or EMT-B's showed up to the scene, no matter the patient's condition, and I would not be able to provide any ALS care in that setting anyway.

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159 Posts; 4,252 Profile Views

Now I am curious, what was the disposition of the patient on the airplane?

He was handed off to the EMS (which was waiting at the gate). I'd assume they were EMT-P's since they had him on a heart monitor and what not.

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