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antidote

antidote

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antidote's Latest Activity

  1. antidote

    teaching phlebotomy class

    http://www.borders.com/online/store/TitleDetail?sku=0781761387 I was actually just looking through this book yesterday since it caught my eye. It appears to be rather detailed. In the procedures section, it provides the rationale for each step which will be helpful for you and your students.
  2. antidote

    New LPN starting LTC, what "things" are needed

    I think most of what I'd suggest is covered already. - BP cuff (even if you're not sharing, you never know when something may malfunction or you need to take something right away and don't have time to run and get some of the facilities equipment. - Stethoscope - Thermometer (preferably one of the temporal ones for easy usage and cleaning) - Paper/Pen - Pen Light - Scissors If you are allowed, perhaps you can find a nice lab coat with nice of pockets to carry the BP cuff and what not. Otherwise, I'm sure you can carry a little bag or something to attach onto your waist. Good luck!
  3. antidote

    Having A Nursing School Freak Out!

    When you get a doctor in the room and all of those nurses start jabbering, I don't know how anyone could hear themselves think sometimes! I can relate, and I'm sure loads of other people can. In nursing school, you should learn the BASIC fundamentals of nursing and human body. Here are some resources that I hope help you out. And if you have any questions I can answer directly, please feel free to ask them! http://www.rtstudents.com/lpnstudents/lpn-anatomy.htm (HIGHLY recommend) http://lpncentral.com/reference.html http://www.anatomy-resources.com/ As for assessment goes, there are a LOAD of threads about that on the forums. Do a little peeking around.
  4. Absolutely disgusting. I cannot believe that people have the heart to let someone in need just lay there. God, makes me wonder what would happen if I were lying on the ground in the middle of a shopping mall.
  5. antidote

    Types of Anaesthesia - Which is best?

    I don't know too much about Anaesthesia since it just wasn't something that interested me too much so I never did any extra study on it. But I've always wondered: when do you guys determine which Anaesthesia is best for a specific procedure, since some can be done using general/local? Is it up to the patient?
  6. antidote

    She is sleeping with a patient.............

    I'm a bit confused about something: when you discovered the pictures, was this part of company policy to research the applicant over the internet or was this something you did yourself? I am 50/50 here. For now, I'd leave it be. The relationship was going on before she was hired. BUT! let it run its course. I can see that drugs will come up that were not counted for, and that things will get a bit... iffy with what she's dipping in while she's in the pharmacy (since you said he has a history of abuse).
  7. antidote

    my drug-seeking nurse patient

    Oh goodness! Good luck dealing with this gal. I'd talk to my manager and get the heck off of her case. I wouldn't want anything to do with her crazy actions. Why is she being admitted? If there is no good reason for her to be there in the hospital why doesn't she get discharged?
  8. antidote

    Upset about being yelled at by MD (long)

    Well, all I can say is whatever man. lol. That MD obviously has a little somethin somethin she doesn't like about you and certainly isn't able to take the stand for something she is equally responsible for: the patient. There are so many doctors like that it seems. They look at us as "just nurses" but then they turn around and say that it's OUR responsibility for our care. Hello! YOU direct the care, NOT us! I'm sorry to hear that you had to deal with that though. I'd just brush it off and hit work again with all you got. Don't let it bother you.
  9. antidote

    Med Surg NIGHTMARE

    Well, despite what we did learn in Nursing school about your brain and it's functions, this is how it REALLY works: if you don't practice something for a while, it's hard to recall and you WILL forget. Additionally, if it's stupid YOU WILL forget it. Please, take my advice here. If you have questions about these books just drop me a PM and I'll see if I can help you. I purchased these great "notebooks" from Borders and they're called Nurse's Clinical Pocket Guide. They're about $15-$20 each and at small enough but detailed enough as well to fit in your pocket, and is an AWESOME resource. It's easy to understand and works like this: 1. Disease/Illness 2. Symptoms 3. Treatment (what you should do) 4. What the patient should do ... on the same page. So it's quite amazing I picked up Med-Surg and Paramedic (for the quick drug resources). I probably sound like a commercial but these books have saved my arse over and over again.
  10. antidote

    Hypnotic Induction

    A friend of mine has been seeing a hypnotist here recently for a few "phobias" that she's working on getting rid of. Now, I understand that hypnosis is very psychological but, what is with all of this "hypnotic induction" and what not where they can "put the pt to sleep in under 10 seconds"? I'm just not seeing any realism here. Heck, if it were real I'd love to learn how. *giggles like a little girl* Any information on this?
  11. antidote

    a nurse's medicine cabinet

    Ditto. All of that of course plus a few more gizmo's and gadgets. In addition, I also have a fully stocked trauma bag with all kinds of dressings mainly. Next to that, I have my ambu neck collar, my backboard (just picked that up about ~2 weeks ago), and a case of 5 single use BVM's. Perhaps I'm a little insane... no?
  12. antidote

    AED Question

    This reminded me of when Mythbusters did this. MYTH! If you place the pads correctly (as instructed) you should have no problem at all. The piercing most likely is not THAT big that it will get the way. By placing the pads on the opposite side of the body, the current will flow right through and it will not be interrupted by some little clip on... God knows what nowadays!
  13. antidote

    Physician Abbreviation - Can't Read This One

    Oh yes, definetly ask the doctor himself before you act on that -- NEVER assume if you can't read as it could be dangerous to you, the patient and/or the patients family. Keep in mind that some doctors like to "make up" abbreviations - so if you don't know, just ask. :lol2:
  14. antidote

    What's behind your name?

    Yeah, same here. I only put it behind my name when it's something related to my title (a note, paper at work, report, etc.). If I'm writing a letter to BestBuy I won't put it behind my name (I'd be to scared to let those people know I was smart). I've always tried to go by the saying "impress them with with your care and not your degree".
  15. antidote

    What's behind your name?

    Just out of curiosity: when you guys sign off on something or just put your name on a piece of paper, do you include all of the titles you have? Personally, I find it annoying when someone with an entire alphabet behind their name (normally MD's with all kinds of other Bachelors and doctored degrees that title everything and every class they've taken) writes it out on everything their name is on. Personally, I just put my name and then, RN - I don't include the BSN or CCRN or anything special like that.
  16. antidote

    Layout of your hospital's units

    Our hospital has a BIG circular, flat "stair case" going through the middle and there is a landing to get off onto each floor. All of the floors with the exception of the ICU and med-surg are boxed; meaning the nurses station is in the middle, and the rooms are around. Our ER is THE most awfully laid out I've ever seen. We have a fairly decent size ER - and we have 3 massive gaping long hallways from the triage until the elevator all the way at the other end (with the exception of the staff elevator in the front which is used to transport trauma up, down and around. Anyways, this means if someone coded in the ER, people from the nurses station (which is right across from the triage) would need to run allllll the way down, make a right, and allllll the way down the end of that hall.
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