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Question on FNP subspecialties

Posted

Specializes in NICU, Post-partum.

I have seen at various nursing graduate programs where there are ACNP's, NNP's, PNP's, etc.

However, I have noticed that there are Nurse Practitioners that work in the offices of specialists such as Endocrinology, Cardiology, Oncology, etc.

So my question....is, if you have a FNP educational background...how do you get the specialist training?

For example, if I wanted to work with diabetic children...what type of education would I need?

I have seen at various nursing graduate programs where there are ACNP's, NNP's, PNP's, etc.

However, I have noticed that there are Nurse Practitioners that work in the offices of specialists such as Endocrinology, Cardiology, Oncology, etc.

So my question....is, if you have a FNP educational background...how do you get the specialist training?

For example, if I wanted to work with diabetic children...what type of education would I need?

PNP

David Carpenter, PA-C

Multiple factors:

Can depend on how the school sets up clinicals.... Usually there are the clinicals that everyone has to do and than there are specialty clinicals.

Sometimes the person you are going to work for does the training.

bayouchick02

Specializes in women's health, NICU.

what if i wanted to do something with special needs children?? would it be best to go the PNP route or could i just do the FNP (for marketability reasons) and maybe take additional specialty clinicals/classes?

BabyLady, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU, Post-partum.

One of the schools (that is closer and cheaper) that I am looking at has an FNP with a "Clinical in Speciality" option.

I didn't know how broad or narrow this option would be...this same school also doesn't have a PNP program.

I just didn't know what the lower age limits were.

patrick1rn, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I have seen at various nursing graduate programs where there are ACNP's, NNP's, PNP's, etc.

However, I have noticed that there are Nurse Practitioners that work in the offices of specialists such as Endocrinology, Cardiology, Oncology, etc.

So my question....is, if you have a FNP educational background...how do you get the specialist training?

For example, if I wanted to work with diabetic children...what type of education would I need?

What is your educational background right now ?

The learning does not stop after you graduate, you are not limited, contrary to what Mr PA says. Go for the FNP

I did. I know FNPs who work as inpatient critical care peds providers. Your degree is just a stepping stone, not the ultimatum of your knowledge base.

go for the fnp

i did. i know fnps who work as inpatient critical care peds providers. your degree is just a stepping stone, not the ultimatum of your knowledge base.

this isn't allowed in several states. check with your board of nursing to find out the scope of practice for np specialties. i don't know of any fnp programs that include inpatient rotations, much less in critical care! furthermore, there aren't any questions related to inpatient care on the fnp exams.

I have a similar question. My goal is to work with adult oncology patients. This is anywhere from 18 yo and above. Would an FNP or an ANP be better? Thanks.

I have a similar question. My goal is to work with adult oncology patients. This is anywhere from 18 yo and above. Would an FNP or an ANP be better? Thanks.

There are Oncology NP programs. In states that don't recognize Oncology NPs it defaults to ANP. If I recall you take the ANP cert and then can take the Oncology cert. The oncology cert will probably not be recognized much longer because of the way that certification works (in my opinion).

David Carpenter, PA-C

I have been accepted to Yale's oncology program, and it is true that I will get the ANP first. I was wondering if a program like that was necessary to become an AOCNP, or if I could go the FNP route and then get the hours and sit for the AOCNP at later date.

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