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Psych APRN psychotherapy?

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I was just wondering how much training do psychiatric APRNs have in psychotherapy? Is it extensive? Or is their role more for diagnosis and medication management?

Psychiatric CNSs received extensive training in psychotherapy (and diagnosis); that is basically what the psych CNS role was, until the psych NP role got invented and a lot of states started blurring the roles. Psych NPs receive little training in therapy, and their education and role is focused on medication management.

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

I'm a psych CNS. I didn't get more than a bit of training in school in either therapy or medication management. I had to learn it on my own.

Psych CNS's are used mostly as prescribers where I live. Personally, I much prefer the therapy role.

I'm a psych CNS. I didn't get more than a bit of training in school in either therapy or medication management. I had to learn it on my own.

Psych CNS's are used mostly as prescribers where I live. Personally, I much prefer the therapy role.

Are you a more recent graduate? What did your graduate program focus on? All the psych CNSs I've known over the years (inc. myself) were trained as psychotherapists (plus the standard CNS role stuff, but the psych content was all psychopathology, diagnosis, and therapy).

Psychiatric CNSs received extensive training in psychotherapy (and diagnosis); that is basically what the psych CNS role was, until the psych NP role got invented and a lot of states started blurring the roles. Psych NPs receive little training in therapy, and their education and role is focused on medication management.

What is the difference between a clinical nurse specialist and a aprn?

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Moved to student NP

What is the difference between a clinical nurse specialist and a aprn?

There are four roles that are considered advanced practice nursing; clinical nurse specialists (CNS), nurse practitioners (NP), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA), and certified nurse midwives (CNM). Psych CNSs and psych NPs are both APRNs.

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

Are you a more recent graduate? What did your graduate program focus on? All the psych CNSs I've known over the years (inc. myself) were trained as psychotherapists (plus the standard CNS role stuff, but the psych content was all psychopathology, diagnosis, and therapy).

I graduated in 2001. My program focused on general advanced practice nursing things. All in the MSN took the same courses until the last three courses that delved into the specialty. There was some focus on therapy and a semester of clinical in it. The other semester was more about community psych nursing and patient education. I had no courses in psychopharm and only got that when I took an independent study course after graduation.

I was grossly unprepared by my program.

I was grossly unprepared by my program.

Wow, I'm sorry to hear that ...

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

My school, a well respected state university, was a NP program that functioned more like a CNS program so while we got the few required NP pharmacology credits we also got way too much psychotherapy, imo. I didn't mind the classes but really wanted more indepth pharm and as a NP I don't do therapy. I'm fortunate to work with excellent therapists who do therapy at a fraction of my billing rate.

There are four roles that are considered advanced practice nursing; clinical nurse specialists (CNS), nurse practitioners (NP), certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA), and certified nurse midwives (CNM). Psych CNSs and psych NPs are both APRNs.

OK so what is the difference between a nurse practitioner and a clinical nurse specialist?

OK so what is the difference between a nurse practitioner and a clinical nurse specialist?

Is there something stopping you from looking that up yourself? That information is freely available (elsewhere on this site, even). Nursing is all about knowing (figuring out) how and where to find the information you need.