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AggieNurse2B

AggieNurse2B

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AggieNurse2B's Latest Activity

  1. AggieNurse2B

    How much do I charge??

    Thanks for your responses. I haven't talked to the attorney, yet, but I wanted to be prepared with a price before he called me. I'll do a quick google and see what I can find out.
  2. AggieNurse2B

    How much do I charge??

    Hi, AllNurses! I'm an ICU nurse with a little over three years of experience. I've been approached by an attorney (a friend of a friend, who also happens to be an attorney) about doing a little work for him on a criminal case. He is not asking me for expert testimony. He needs a nurse to go through the stacks and stacks of medical records and summarize the treatment. I don't purport to be an "expert" due to my relatively limited time in the field of ICU nursing, but I think I am qualified to handle summarizing the course of treatment for this patient. Do any of you legal nursing experts see an issue with this? Also, I'm in Texas, and I don't have the first clue how much I should charge for this type of service. I'm not trying to make a big career move--I love my job in the ICU. But working up a nice summary for this attorney would be both interesting and would give me a little spending money. Any help you could give me would be much appreciated!
  3. AggieNurse2B

    Ethical Question About Pacemaker

    I dealt with the same issue on a personal level. My grandmother had an AICD, and when we put her on hospice, the MD ordered the pacemaker rep out to "d/c" it. But he didn't write whether to d/c the pacer, the defibrilator, or both. The pacemaker rep disabled the defib but refused to stop the pacer itself, citing that a pacer will not keep a dying heart from dying. I argued that there was no need to have the pacer in a woman who was in MODS and expected to pass at any given moment, completely unresponsive (for days), DNR in place, literally with her family surrounding her, ready to go. I should back up a bit and say that the pacemaker rep took forever to get there to turn the AICD off--12 hours in a patient who wasn't expected to even live another 12 hours. I had already had my brother go to the local Tractor Supply and buy me a big magnet. (I found it odd that the hospice nurse didn't have one? Is this not something they deal with on a fairly regular basis? Maybe not.) I refused to let my mom and her siblings see their mother being shocked just because the pacemaker chick couldn't find it in her busy schedule to get there and turn it off. Anyway, to the OP, I think it was a huge oversight that the MD didn't write to have the pacer d/c'd in the patient. It was cruel and awful that the patient suffered and wasn't allowed to die as a result of this MD's negligence. You did the right thing. In my experience with dying patients, sometimes it takes a bit to begin to feel like you did the right thing. And, yes, 20 mg of Morphine, not 4 mg. Everytime.
  4. AggieNurse2B

    IABP Mean Greater than Systolic?

    I had my very first ECMO pt last week (yay!), and this was the exact scenario. Crashed pt onto ECMO when IABP and Impella failed. Took Impella out, but left IABP d/t risk of bleeding.
  5. AggieNurse2B

    Concealed Carry...as a nurse?

    I can only say that if a patient or patient's family member ever has me at gunpoint, I hope like hell one of my co-workers has broken the rules and carried his/her gun to work and that he/she is gutsy enough to pull the trigger. I just got my CHL, and I wish I could take my gun with me to work. I'm not so worried about the happenings at the hospital while I'm working, because I feel like I work in a pretty safe unit. I do wish I could carry it with me as I'm walking to/from my car in the parking garage.
  6. AggieNurse2B

    Insulin and Levophed drips on cardiovascular unit

    Run. Run fast. Run hard. Don't look back. Levo on the floor is an absolute no-no--Very dangerous for patients and very dangerous for an RN with 4-6 patients to be trying to juggle. To me, it's absolutely insane to even suggest something so ridiculous. Our facility doesn't send out vasoactives, central lines or art lines, or insulin gtts to the floor or step-down. Ever. Under any circumstances. We are max 2 patients in ICU--I've only been tripled once in 1.5 years, and it was only for an hour or so. I just can't believe anyone who knows anything about these drugs would even suggest such a thing.
  7. AggieNurse2B

    What info should nurses let a PCT/CNA be aware of?

    I'm with Esme12 on this one. You, as a nurse, have a duty to your co-workers to inform them of bloodborne pathogens when the CNA/PCT/whomever is dealing with the patient's body fluids. The CNA/PCT/whomever is bound by the same patient privacy laws you are, and I think it's professional courtesy to help them protect themselves. Sure, you exercise universal precautions with all patients, but you KNOW you're extra vigilent with a pt you know is infected. You may not treat them differently, but you're extra cautious. If you say otherwise, you're kidding yourself.
  8. AggieNurse2B

    TWU Spring 2010

    Very simple. Reflect the feeling. That's all you need to know! Psych is not all that bad. Just don't make it harder than it has to be...If the answer looks right, don't second guess yourself.
  9. AggieNurse2B

    PBDS test . How to prepare?

    Wish I could! Especially since I see PBDS test on my internship schedule, which starts in a couple weeks, and I have no idea what PBDS even stands for!
  10. I need a little advice from my fine nursing friends here! I originally posted this in the Career forum, but I thought I might get a few more sets of eyes on it here. I graduate this May with my BSN, and I have my heart set on a particular internship at a particular hospital. I did clinicals at this hospital and on this floor/area this past semester, and the charge nurse knows of my interest. She even called the hiring manager for me and told him to look for my resume when the position is posted in January. (Bless this woman!) I have the name and e-mail for this hiring manager and, although the position is not yet posted, I wanted to make contact. First of all, good idea or not? I'm thinking so, but I'd like confirmation. Second of all, should I go ahead and e-mail my resume, even though I'll be submitting it online in a few weeks when the position posts? (I'm checking the website EVERY single day to be sure I don't miss it.) Any advice would be helpful! Background: I'm a second degree student who (quite literally) sold her soul to the devil in order to get through nursing school and get a job in this particular specialty. Losing this opportunity is not an option. Also related: I had a very professional career in my past life, and I want to emphasize that I'm a professional person. I was successful in some pretty big outfits, but I don't want to bore anyone with the details. Any advice on exactly how to accomplish that?
  11. I need a little advice from my fine nursing friends here! I graduate this May with my BSN, and I have my heart set on a particular internship at a particular hospital. I did clinicals at this hospital and on this floor/area this past semester, and the charge nurse knows of my interest. She even called the hiring manager for me and told him to look for my resume when the position is posted in January. (Bless this woman!) I have the name and e-mail for this hiring manager and, although the position is not yet posted, I wanted to make contact. First of all, good idea or not? I'm thinking so, but I'd like confirmation. Second of all, should I go ahead and e-mail my resume, even though I'll be submitting it online in a few weeks when the position posts? (I'm checking the website EVERY single day to be sure I don't miss it.) Any advice would be helpful! Background: I'm a second degree student who (quite literally) sold her soul to the devil in order to get through nursing school and get a job in this particular specialty. Losing this opportunity is not an option. Also related: I had a very professional career in my past life, and I want to emphasize that I'm a professional person. I was successful in some pretty big outfits, but I don't want to bore anyone with the details. Any advice on exactly how to accomplish that?
  12. AggieNurse2B

    someone tell me it gets better after RN school???

    Uncool. You owe the OP an apology. I graduate in May, and, although I didn't ever have to do LTC in nursing school, I did have to deal with some pretty nasty poo. My first day, I nearly puked cleaning up a patient. Does that make me a bad nurse? Nope. I don't think so. You get used to it, honestly. And after the first semester, your clinicals tend to get better. I've been lucky in that our clinical instructors will advocate for us students. They don't allow us to just be in the hospital to do the work the nurses don't want to do or don't have time to do. We're there to LEARN, and there's not much to cleaning up poop and emesis--You can probably figure all that out on your own! I've been to several hospitals in my area, and it's never been an issue, except once and my instructor nipped that one in the bud. Don't lose heart. Stick it out just a bit longer and see if it doesn't get better. By the way, I think the plastic surgery route or the dermatology nurse would be great. Operating room nurses do such a different job than floor nurses. I venture to say that poop in the OR is an exception rather than the rule. Same with dermatology.
  13. AggieNurse2B

    personal cell phone and the internet and impact on staff moral

    Our clinical instructors use texting to tell us what time to meet for lunch, post conference, or if they need to find us for some reason. It's also pretty handy when we need our instructor for something. Often, we're required to either have the clinical instructor with us when performing a specific procedure or have permission from them to perform it with our assigned RN for the day. It's much more efficient to text them and tell them what room you're in/going to be in, rather than run all over the floor looking for them. Maybe it's because we're students and are scared to death of doing something wrong, but I've never seen another student abuse their privilege of carrying their phones (on vibrate) in their pockets. Admittedly, I have seen regular staff using them for personal stuff, but it actually has been pretty rare. I don't have a lot of experience in nursing, per se, but this is a second career for me. In my first career, I often found that people responded better to management giving them some latitude in making appropriate choices, rather than mandating blanket rules from an ivory tower. Just my 2 cents...
  14. AggieNurse2B

    Got a little question for you, Hospice nurses!

    I've written her a letter--Mailed it yesterday. It's hard not to feel helpless, or like what you're doing is not enough, especially when the person is so special to you. My daughter (just turned 8) made her a card that said, "You are everything good." It's amazing how children are so insightful and such good judges of character sometimes! Thanks, again, for the responses, and God bless hospice nurses! (I'm a nursing student, and I just don't see how you do it...But I'm sure glad you do!)
  15. AggieNurse2B

    Got a little question for you, Hospice nurses!

    Thank you for your responses. This very special lady is a nun, and she is in a special hospice house surrounded by her sisters. She is definitely not dying alone and lonely. She was a teacher at our kids' school, and she was/is a very happy and upbeat person. She has the neatest, craziest, zaniest sense of humor you've ever seen! She doesn't want 1) her "babies" to see her in the state she's in, and 2) the parents and fellow teachers who love her so much to remember her as she is right now. I understand her wishes, and I want to respect them. I think I'll send flowers tomorrow. And each week until she passes. Thank you again for your responses. Please pray for her. And for us, those of us who will be left to mourn her loss.
  16. Hello, Hospice nurses! I wondered if you might share some information with me. A lady who is very dear to me is on hospice care right now. She has pancreatic cancer and the doctors give her about 30 days. She is about 200 miles from where I am, so I can't pop over and pay a visit, and she doesn't really want any visitors--She's too tired to receive them, and she doesn't want all of us, who love her so much, to see her in the state she's in. She is extremely religious, and she has already donated all her belongings to my children's school (where she taught until now) to be sold. Here's my question: What do you recommend, as far as sending her something to let her know we love her and are thinking about her? I mailed a big envelope with drawings my kids have done for her, a card, and a few pictures. Somehow, it doesn't feel like enough, but I want to avoid being "selfish" and sending things just to make ME feel better. Does that make sense? Are flowers appropriate? I just don't want to send anything that would be more trouble than it's worth, but I do want her to know we care. Suggestions?