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SweetPotatoes

SweetPotatoes

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  1. SweetPotatoes

    New Grad Orientation Contracts

    @nurseblaq I meant to quote you sorry-still figuring out this phone lol I gotcha, I see how this looks like a sign on bonus based on the way I wrote this. But I believe those are technically reserved for experienced nurses- I don't know if they have a contract associated with sign on bonuses or not. This was a program I did through my school as a new grad-the hospital gave me 10k through my school in exchange for three years, and I completed my practicum on this unit. The other new grads who did not do this thru their schools are going through what the OP describe, having to pay out of pocket for orientation costs if they leave before the three years. For me, the point was that I still had to sign a contract as a new grad and have the same obligations, even as those who did not get the scholarship through school. But the 10k did make a difference in terms of me choosing to accept the position.
  2. SweetPotatoes

    New Grad Orientation Contracts

    I graduated last year and started at my current hospital last July. I had to sign a three-year contract and I got $10,000 for it. If you leave before the three years due to disability, then the amount is forgiven- but otherwise you have to pay it back. I used some of the money for tuition and set aside the rest in case something happens and I need to leave before my three years. I understand that a lot of new grads leave jobs within a couple of months which is weird to me, to not even try to stick it out a year. That being said, I work in an emergency room that is extremely unsafe in terms of staffing and resources, and things always being broken, not having enough nurses to travel to tests with critical patients, having two icu patients as well as two other patients (ratio 4:1), not having enough techs, getting 3 patients back to back after discharging three to upstairs, etc. this tends to be the reason that nurses leave. but honestly in my facility, more experienced nurses leave more than the new graduates. Because of the unsafe working conditions. I do well in chaos / under pressure so I don't plan on leaving unless something really crazy happens. I understand the need for contracts but on the other hand it does kind of suck having this over my head. however, my contract is a hospital one, not an emergency room one. So technically if I realize that I can't take the emergency room anymore, then I am supposed to be able to transfer to another unit within the hospital. However people have tried and the managers have blocked their efforts 🤷🏾*♀️
  3. SweetPotatoes

    What did you do in the ER today?

    I'm brand spanking new to nursing and to the ED. I... Took care of an admitted patient who refused a bed the bed we assigned him so he was stuck with us the whole shift. Quite annoying patient I may add. He was in for infection around a fixator on his leg. Took care of a stroke patient 1:1 monitoring vitals and doing neuro assessment q15 minutes for 2 hours. Started seizing during an X-ray and we gave her ativan and keppra. Took care of a post septic patient who got an infection from an abscess. Got one stick out of like 5 tries but I'm gonna keep working on it!
  4. SweetPotatoes

    ED Pay vs Med/Surg Pay

    Where I am ED gets1.40 more than floor.
  5. SweetPotatoes

    Got a nurse aide fired... did I do the right thing?

    I sympathize with the poster who stated that their management wants extraordinary levels of proof regarding lazy coworkers. Nurses at my facility complain about some of the techs, but management will not do anything unless there is something in writing. I thought it would be enough if you had 10 nurses complaining about the same tech, but I guess mgmt needs to cover themselves against retaliation... And have documentation of the repeated offenses. I understand that but it's frustrating. Not just them, there's some lazy nurses also who need to go but are still here, for whatever reason. I wouldn't have taken a picture, but if that's all that your facility would believe jn order to finally do something then so be it. She got herself fired.
  6. SweetPotatoes

    I passed the NCLEX in 75 questions with LOW KAPLAN SCORES!

    I got mostly 50s and 3 60s on practice questions and a 64 on readiness and passed in 75. Never got above that 64 and found the actual nclex much easier than the trainers.
  7. SweetPotatoes

    Maintaining patho knowledge base in the ER

    Just because it's so fast I guess. But another poster who worked in an ICU also stated that she rarely had time to delve into patho on her own either. I guess they are both fast, in their own ways. In the ER now we just move so quickly and have patients moving in and out so much that I don't have a lot of time to really think about the patient admitted for status asthmaticus or the one with ovarian torsion. But my new preceptor is better at teaching than my old one and asks me patho questions while we are doing things, which has certainly helped!
  8. SweetPotatoes

    Maintaining patho knowledge base in the ER

    Wow thanks so much for the detailed response! That's a good idea about the binder and about the discharge instructions. My preceptor also encouraged me to ask the providers why he/she ordered a certain m ed or test, to help me think through the process, so thanks for confirming that. And that's so true about how the ED is a good fit for my comm health goals...thanks for the encouragement about running my own clinic in 6 years When you had your brief stint in the ICU, was that a PRN type thing? Did you find it hard to adjust since the environments are so different?
  9. SweetPotatoes

    Maintaining patho knowledge base in the ER

    Thanks for the tip! Are there any ones in particular you suggest ?
  10. SweetPotatoes

    Maintaining patho knowledge base in the ER

    Thanks! Any particular ones you like?
  11. SweetPotatoes

    Maintaining patho knowledge base in the ER

    Thank you so much. Once I'm further along I'll see if I can do this cross training...I would love that. And definitely good point about taking advantage of our proximity to the providers.
  12. SweetPotatoes

    Maintaining patho knowledge base in the ER

    Thanks for the response! How long did you do ICU before moving to ER, and what specific things make you more satisfied?
  13. Hi everyone, I accepted a position as a new graduate in a ED. It is an adult trauma center but has pediatrics which is extremely appealing to me, as I love being able to work with both populations (especially the children!). I'm currently completing my practicum here to prepare me for my impending orientation. I'm one of those students who truly enjoys pathophysiology and pharmacology, and teaching. One of my favorite parts of nursing is teaching, as my first degree is in public health and I eventually want to be a community health nurse or provider. I like when I can explain something to patients and see that they understand it better than they did before. The emergency department is great for teaching, which is another draw. However, over the past several weeks I realized​ that there something that I am concerned about, and was wondering if I could get advice. Because the atmosphere is so quick, I'm realizing that everything is so reactive and very task-oriented... Of course nurses have to use quick critical thinking/assessment skills here, but I see I am not going to get the same ability to delve into patho as I would in the ICU setting. I like the ER, I just wish there was a way I could figure out how to maintain and grow in my level of patho knowledge. I spoke with one of the ER nurses who used to be an ICU nurse, and she told me that even in the ICU, she still had to look things up. So I began keeping a nursing journal where I write down the diagnoses that I encounter...& in in my free time I look them up, as well as common medical treatments. This is no substitute for the learning I would get on in an ICU or even a med surg / tele floor, but I'm just really worried that if I were to move to another specialty in the future I would have a hard time learning everything again. Plus I kind of just want this knowledge for myself so I can understand what's going on in the body. Does anybody have any other suggestions as to how I can keep up with patho and critical thinking skills? I know that I'm going to have a hard enough time adjusting to the emergency department, and that this will not be a priority for a long time...but when I'm ready to return to it after I start finding my way around my new job, I'd like to have some ideas. Thanks so much.
  14. SweetPotatoes

    Do you have to hate adults to love peds?

    thank you so much for your story! what dedication you have to travel so far! i am also looking at pediatric heme onc positions here in baltimore.
  15. SweetPotatoes

    Do you have to hate adults to love peds?

    Thanks for the response. I too have noticed, over and over again, how much more adults seem to complain sometimes than children. You're right--it's their normal. I have congenital conditions myself that have caused me to be a staple in doctors' offices over the years but I don't know anything different.
  16. SweetPotatoes

    Do you have to hate adults to love peds?

    Being able to float sounds awesome. Are there limits to floating? Like would a med surge floor take a L&D nurse? Or would an icu take a med surg nurse?