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Jessica Quigley

Jessica Quigley

MENTAL HEALTH, EDUCATION,ADMINISTRATION
Member Member Columnist Nurse
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Jessica Quigley specializes in MENTAL HEALTH, EDUCATION,ADMINISTRATION.

Jessica Quigley's Latest Activity

  1. I just wanted to take a moment to thank of all of you for your comments and say WOW! I am really happy with the level of interest that this article has sparked and received. I realize that not all of my fellow nurses share my views and some have views that are very much so the direct opposite of mine. For the most part that's ok as long as they can still give 100% to their patients and sleep at night with a clear conscience of the care they have provided, then so be it. As nurses and in the honor of Flo we accepted the challenge to "do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession" and "devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care". This doesn't mean we get to choose which patient scenarios apply. We have always been the advocate for our patient and must continue to do so even if the situations go against our own beliefs. If we stay focused on what are the facts --- Patients are in danger of being harmed or even dying because of discrimination within healthcare settings --- then we can get back on track with not "why are we doing this?" but "how can we do this better?" Keep it coming everyone! PS: I am attaching a this link again in case it got missed. [COLOR=#1155cc]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/[/COLOR]2015/06/15/transgender-health-care_n_7587506.html?utm_hp_ref=gay-voices
  2. thanks! I was thrilled to be given the opportunity to write it :) Anything that we as nurses can do to bring positive attention to an area in need of advancement is progress.
  3. Secretperson- Healthcare professionals may work with every demographic but to say that we are already treating everyone equally would be delusional. We need reminders and education about how to improve and ensure that everyone is being treated equally. I am sorry to inform you but transgender patients have become victims .. victims of discrimination that is now costing them their lives. Please see the following link for an enlightening and scary story of one such patient. [COLOR=#1155cc]http://www.huffingtonpost.com/[/COLOR]2015/06/15/transgender-health-care_n_7587506.html?utm_hp_ref=gay-voices
  4. We are there to provide nursing care. Now if nursing tasks required violate your beliefs, by all means avoid those positions. And being kind and not humiliating someone is always the right thing to do
  5. Well said, if we as nurses are not comfortable with any situation or patient enough to provide our best care in a non judging fashion, we always have the option to excuse ourselves and ask another nurse to take over. My very first nursing instructor used to say nursing isn't for everyone, some people should drop out and just drive delivery trucks. This used to make me laugh until I realized how true it was.
  6. Well said, "all patients". While it is unrealistic to think that we as nurses will not have our own opinions,we must learn to put aside and remember why we came to this field.
  7. Agreed .. But unfortunately it happened all too often. Is it possible that sometimes it is unintentional or an oversight? Sure, but as professionals we are supposed to be on a higher level of awareness than the average citizen.
  8. The waiting room is busy; she sits gently pulling at the edge of her new summer dress. It seemed like such a smart buy earlier in the week but now leafing through the shiny guide she received at the new employee orientation she wonders if the bright blue flower pattern and sleeveless cut is a bit too flashy for the office. Next to her is the stack of paperwork which she has dutifully completed, such a joyful task. The clock ticks on, she chews nervously on her pencil. She thinks back to other appointments, ones similar to this, she breathes in and lets out a long sigh. Finally the door opens, the nurse steps out and calls loudly, "David, the doctor will see you now". She stands, a swirl of Azure wilted by a moment of ignorance. The story of "David", although fictional, is based upon the realistic events of a Transwoman, assigned a male gender at birth, now identifying as a female. Transgender individuals often avoid seeking healthcare related to fear and the potential for discrimination. Nurses are often the first contact that patients make when receiving care so they play a crucial role in developing rapport with their patients and creating welcoming environments. Transgender is the general term used when referring to people who identify with a different gender than what they were assigned at birth. It really is not possible to get an accurate count on the number of people in the world that are transgender since the statistics are sketchy due to under reporting. With the accomplishments of actress/producer/LGBTQ advocateLaverne Cox as well as the recent outing of Olympic athlete, formerly known as Bruce Jenner, transgender topics have become more acceptable in social media. However the potential for violence and discrimination are still major issues for most patients. It is for this reason that it is not uncommon for patients to limit interactions with providers based upon feelings of anxiety or negative past experiences. Issues with insurance coverage for medically necessary gender-related care or inappropriate care, reprisal at work related to their gender identity/need for medical procedures, and general access to medical services needed within their communities are frequent worries for patients. Lack of continuity of care and noncompliance with treatment is cause for concern as it relates to such medical disorders such as diabetes, heart disease, substance abuse, HIV, and mental health conditions. In recent studies, transgender patients were found 9 times more likely to have attempted suicide than the average person. Social risks such homelessness and lack of support systems were known to be high stressors. Refusal of care by medical providers and discrimination were also key factors for suicide risk. Transgender patients should be able to access healthcare without fear or ridicule. Barriers to care exist in all environments and need to be broken efficiently. It is extremely important to educate yourself and others within your workplace in an effort to create safe, inclusive, patient centered care facilities. Increased awareness of barriers that patients may have already encountered prior to our visit allows us to appreciate the potential for underlying apprehension and frustration they may be experiencing. Nursing staff may also have feelings of nervousness stemming from a lack of knowledge regarding Transgender patients. Our own approach and demeanor can allow us to better anticipate the needs of the patient to improve overall outcomes. What can nurses do to reduce stigma and make their workplaces more sensitive to the LGBTQ/transgender community? Focus on making sure that you are properly educated and share your knowledge with your colleagues. Be sure to use transgender affirmative and inclusive language. Ask patients their preference for word choice, especially when using names, pronouns, and other words to describe their body. It is important to ensure that environments are welcoming to the LGBTQ/transgender community. This can be accomplished through the display of LGBTQ acceptance signage as well as educational materials in the waiting room. Lastly, never assume! Whether it is the gender of a person, sexual orientation, or the answer to another health related question, nurses cannot avoid asking the questions necessary to properly assess and care for patients even if they are embarrassing or difficult. Remembering to incorporate sensitivity from the beginning of our assessment all the way through care delivery is a must! Respecting the individual needs of our patients and advocating for quality care has always been the nurse's forte. Ensuring that we do all that we can for the transgender population to receive the healthcare services that they deserve should be no different. Jessica S. Quigley RN, DNP
  9. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    Thank you everyone for all of your positive comments and feedback. I am glad that this article has received such great response. I have enjoyed reading all of your posts and look forward to more as I continue on in the next weeks/months with additional articles to come. I will be branching out in this topic area, focusing on the important work that mental health nurses do/patient scenarios in which their expertise is a must. Thanks again! JSQ
  10. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    Thanks so much, glad you enjoyed it! Good luck to you!
  11. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    I always tell my students mental health nursing provides the foundation for all nursing and life! It teaches you to build relationships with your patients and no matter what setting you are in there is always a mental health aspect ... It is unavoidable. In addition, there are all too often other situations that arise with patients families, your co-workers, or in your personal life... Etc. you can not escape!
  12. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    All too often profs pass on ill feelings to their students regarding clinical material/settings. We must remember that we are shaping the careers and attitudes of future caregivers. I'm so happy you were not tainted by her lack of enjoyment for mental health nursing!
  13. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    Agreed we must continue to work daily to build others up to facing the challenge! It may not be everyone's calling but the patients are calling out for the help of nurses in all settings so even if it's just for that one patient you have to be prepared to help.
  14. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    [COLOR=#000000][/COLOR]Verene, Kudos to you for seeking out this education as you branch out into the mentalhealth field. You are correct, in hospice care the focus of an interdisciplinarytreatment team model is fantastic. Especially for making sure all of thesupport staff such as the CNA's are up to date on the care the patient requiressince they are the people on the front lines with the patient. Sadly I thinkwhen we say that nursing programs need to increase the level of education/focus for mental health then CNA programs need to begin it or restart itbecause it seems to be completely gone. This has led to a lot of both patientand staff injury/ dissatisfaction in several facilities that I have workedbecause CNA's are lacking the skills to communicate with patients in crisis andaggressive behaviors occur. [COLOR=#000000][/COLOR]
  15. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    Thank you for sharing your story Viva. It is true you never know when you may be the one no longer "holding the keys" so to speak. ( a little psych humor) Any one of us could fall victim to the clutches of a mental disorder at any given time. None of us have a cloak of armor that protects us. The more education and awareness/exposure we can provide students the better prepared they will be and more apt at developing rapport with patients. This is what people remember, how others have made them feel.
  16. Jessica Quigley

    Eliminating the Stigma Associated with Mental Health Nursing

    [COLOR=#000000][/COLOR]AgreedSmoup, these particular clinical areas should not be shortened or slighted.Especially when they are in such need of staff with appropriate levels ofknowledge. JSQ [COLOR=#000000][/COLOR]