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thywillbedone_

thywillbedone_

Pediatric ED, PICU, Simulation Education
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thywillbedone_ has 3 years experience and specializes in Pediatric ED, PICU, Simulation Education.

Life truly teaches us so many lessons, but are we ready to experience these lessons and apply it on a day to day basis? Advice of the month: Trust the process

thywillbedone_'s Latest Activity

  1. thywillbedone_

    Duke MSN 2018

    Hi @alotah! I submitted my application for the BSN to DNP for Duke. Praying for the best & good luck to you!
  2. thywillbedone_

    Johns Hopkins BSN - DNP Fall 2018

    Hi everyone. I just got my interview email and scheduled for a videoconference next week. I'm pretty excited, but at the same time I'm trying to find more information on how the JHU program is. Just looking at the tuition fee scares me a little bit. Good luck to everyone!
  3. thywillbedone_

    Nursing as a Human Experience

    @TeeKay12 Are you reading my mind? This is exactly one of my thoughts while writing this article! We can all get caught up with the "skills" but the number one skill to have in nursing is compassion.
  4. thywillbedone_

    Nursing as a Human Experience

    @Brenda F. Johnson You have no idea how humbling it was and is for me. It is very draining, physically and emotionally. But that's the beauty of nursing, no matter how hard we work and how tired we are, we always find the strength to give more.
  5. thywillbedone_

    Nursing as a Human Experience

    @topher.houston You're welcome. I really wrote this article as a simple reminder and even a challenge to those of us going through a "dry" season. We all need to inspire each other in the field to better our care for the patients and their families.
  6. thywillbedone_

    Nursing as a Human Experience

    I'm writing this article on my bed, wiping my tears away and making sure that this article makes sense to those who are reading it. I just finished a 13-hour shift yesterday night at the CVICU. I am in my final semester of nursing school and I am so excited to be on this amazing floor for my preceptorship. For the past three shifts that I have been on this floor, I have been so happy that this floor opened up so many avenues and opportunities for learning. Things I have only read in nursing textbooks (when I do read them) are now being applied in the real setting. Machines, pumps and other alarms consistently needed my attention & care. And the patients that I have are "critical," which means that I get to do a lot for the patients and learn and apply many nursing skills. So, I finished getting my report from the night nurse, and my preceptor asked me, "What is your plan of action for today and are you ready for it?" It was a Saturday shift, and it seemed that the floor was quiet (the quietest I've seen it). I answered my preceptor, "I'm ready, it seems that we're gonna have an easy and good day." I shouldn't have said this (which I learned to never ever say this again), or maybe I'm glad I did (because I learned a great lesson). Throughout the day, there were two code blues, one stroke alert, and 3 code ices; all to which one of the CVICU nurses must run and respond. (Trying to keep this short & sweet & maybe sour - from crying.) Truth be told, I thought I was ready, but I wasn't. I was not ready for the tears that the wife of my patient would shed, as she left her husband - who was intubated and required continuous dialysis - to travel 6 hours away to go back home. I was not ready to see a grandchild who would give up the comfort of sleeping and eating, just so that his grandmother could rest well. I was not ready to respond to a stroke alert, in which I chose to comfort the crying daughter who tried to be strong, as 5 nurses were assessing her father. I was not ready for the physician to say, "There's no hope for my patient" in the break room just as I was grabbing my first sip of water for the day. I was not ready for one of the nurses to tell me, "The patient died," as I was too focused in her telling me that she had to perform chest compressions with one hand, for the patient was vomiting and expelling secretions from all places in his body. I was not ready. Being in the healthcare field (I can say this for myself), you forget that people who come to the hospital are really sick; some are more critical than others. You forget that there are so many hospitals in the world, and so many people waiting to be cured. You forget that there are so many more sick and dying people who are not in a hospital bed. You forget that you are in the middle of pain & suffering, as well as faith & hope. During hand-off reports, I became too focused on how many CABGs does the patient have, any lines or drainage, feeding pumps, etc. and charting. You forget that in that chart you only have one line for something, social support. You forget that your own patients are mothers, fathers, grandparents, and children. You forget that you are part of the first line of care for these patients. You forget that whatever you do for these patients directly affects them, whether it is all the medications you give, all the heavy turning & lifting you do, or all the assessments you perform. You also forget the last meal or water break you had, when you last peed or sat down. You forget all of the aching calves and back because you have to hang this med up or cover for a nurse that just ran to the sixth floor to respond to a code blue. You forget that you, yourself, are important. Being in the CVICU, I learned that there are so many patients in the world, from being discharged to dying. Nursing is not just "work" that we have to get through, it is also a human experience. Call it "therapeutic touch," call it "supportive," or call it "active listening." Don't forget that we are human and that there are human experiences to be recognized every time you step on that floor. I now know the importance of the saying, "treat the patient, not the machine." So when you walk into your work, or clinical rotation or preceptorship, ask yourself, "Am I ready?"
  7. thywillbedone_

    Keeping the End in Mind

    I can see why NCLEX-style questions can be confusing (it's a good thing I learned how to answer these questions), or that critical thinking should not be measured through standardized testing. Granted, the NCLEX has been around for a long time, and the way it is implemented has been studied and the questions are all reviewed. It reminded me of how SATs or ACTs work. I believe that, maybe, in the future, students shouldn't just be tested on written or computerized exams. In addition to that, maybe throw in on how the students perform at a simulation experience in the nursing lab. There is always room for improvement especially on how skills, critical thinking and knowledge are being evaluated.
  8. thywillbedone_

    Keeping the End in Mind

    Thank you for your comment. Of course, I don't know what peoples motives are and I never can get the full picture of my fellow colleagues. But at sometimes, once you get to know some of them, their views change. They don't seem as fired up for the future, unlike how they used to be in the beginning of the semester. Their experience in the nursing school, be it a bad experience with a professor, a horrible encounter in clinicals, or the workload of assignments and reading, overwhelms some students and decides that nursing school was a wrong choice or profession. This is a reminder for all of us that we have the decision whether or not our experiences are great or horrific. I'm not assuming that this is the case for everyone, but sometimes we need a reminder that what we do and what we are aiming to become is far greater than what we have expected. It's all about the motives, and you're definitely right about that!
  9. thywillbedone_

    How do I become a successful ER Nurse?

    @lianna88 - So what would be a good floor then for me to learn these skills if I were to go to ER?
  10. thywillbedone_

    How do I become a successful ER Nurse?

    @GrnTea - Thank you for this! Haha, yes I've heard that quote before. He's probably laughing at me right now. I'm keeping my options open definitely. I just want to hear peoples thoughts about it. And I'm grateful for those like you who have replied. So if do want to learn the skills that I need, Med-Surg is what I'm hearing that I should go to first to learn these skills. It's funny because knowing me, I feel that I can fit into ER, Med-Surg or ICU. I can easily adapt, though ER just has that zing! I'll just have to see what I get when I graduate and go from there. But I do want to get SOME clinical experience in all of these fields. I want to know where I feel at home by being on that floor. Having an ED for my senior practicum would be great, IF I can get it.
  11. thywillbedone_

    Keeping the End in Mind

    After going through my first semester in nursing school (now in my second), I've realized that not a lot of students are keeping the end in mind. What I mean by this, nursing students have become so stressed about "getting the A" instead of saying, "I need this knowledge for NCLEX" or "I want to learn so I can become a better nurse to provide the best care for my patients." And unfortunately, we won't always get the "A," but that's just fine. Yes, students like me do want to pass the NCLEX and getting that RN next to our names. But the knowledge you gain, semester by semester, suddenly disappears. Why does this happen? It's because we have become short-sighted in our goals. I'm writing this, because I, too, have become short-sighted. But now that I am in my second semester, I've realized why classes such as Fundamentals, Health Assessment, Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and the rest are all intertwined, like a piece of artwork. Each subject is a color, not yet known. Each student is an artist, who constantly changes the artwork. This artwork, my friends, is the end. In my nursing class, students overlook the basics, and I was one of them. We say to ourselves, that health assessment is easy and we don't need to practice. Later on, we forget that assessment is the most important thing when coming into the patient's room. I've heard a nursing student say, "I feel incompetent when I walk into a room. I don't know where to start and what to do." But that is the reality of nursing. Unfortunately, the most we know about a patient is what the nurse tells us when changing shifts. We need to do our own assessments and know that there is always something to be done or said in a room. But of course, that comes with knowledge, experience, and confidence. I'm learning that I can't just simply write what the previous nurse wrote on her Kardex or documented. A great nurse goes through the whole nursing process, for every single patient she has. During clinicals, grab hold of the opportunity to DO SOMETHING. Never let your clinical experience go by and all you had to do was watch. Again, there is always something new to be done, something needed to be said, and something great to be understood. Even if your patients are "stable," do something. Always strive to learn about another skill, about your patient, or about the environment that you surround yourself with. And in class, know the reason why you're learning something. Do not let your professors hinder you from learning. For instance, I've had a bad experience with pathophysiology, the professor still haunts me as my Med-surg professor, but that doesn't hinder me from learning. I read and I find lectures online. I do what I can so that I do not feel like I don't know anything. Make your nursing experience in school the absolute best. You and I have that choice to do so. For the first-semester students out there, know that every subject has its purpose. Be it online or in-class, you have to do your best to understand and relate the subjects to your experiences. Get the knowledge that you need and be that student who keeps the end in mind. It's hard, especially for those who want the A. But what is the grade all about, when in the future, your job and your patient's life is always on the line? By keeping the end in mind, you're doing yourself a favor. For finals or the NCLEX, studying doesn't become learning all the information all over again; but rather, review, because you did all of the hard work in learning that in your classes. And when you finally are on the floor, you're more confident and have a better understanding of your patients and their cases. If you want a magnificent artwork, you have to add the hues and more colors to your artwork. You got to be patient and know the strokes of the course. You have to be creative and use different brushes. Our canvas is big, and yet our short-sightedness makes our art black and white. But if you keep the end in mind, trust me, you will create and become a beautiful masterpiece.
  12. thywillbedone_

    How do I become a successful ER Nurse?

    @RunBabyRun - Thanks for the comment! Yeah, I'm definitely doing the best I could in terms of my knowledge and skills in med/surg. I have friends that tell me to at least do 6 months to a year in med/surg so you can be comfortable in your skills. I'm looking around my area and doing my research in terms of what the job entails (hopefully, I get more of an understanding if my clinical instructor lets me go to the ED). I have many connections in the hospitals around me for Med/Surg, OR, and Oncology, but I need to get to know people in the ER and get a chance to talk to them to see what I can do to get there.
  13. thywillbedone_

    How do I become a successful ER Nurse?

    @learning as I go - I definitely would request ER if I can get it for my practicum! Thank you for your suggestion. Of course I would take it one step at the time, it's just sometimes I want to plan it all out (although, it may not work out the way I planned, or God's plans are different from mine). Yes, I'm just reading more and more about the ER and I know I have to be on top of my game. It's tough for my program to get ER as a practicum, but I will try my best and just go for it. Good luck with you too and thanks again!
  14. thywillbedone_

    How do I become a successful ER Nurse?

    @lianna88 I got different advices from the nurses I come in contact with, either ICU or Medsurg floor. But thank you, I'll definitely network!
  15. thywillbedone_

    How do I become a successful ER Nurse?

    Hi! I am in my second semester in my nursing program, and I am loving the nursing profession and I'm doing well in school! After reading through different forums, I really want to become fit enough to become an ER nurse, and eventually become a ED Nurse Practitioner. But I don't know what is the best route for me to take to accomplish this and become successful at it. For instance, I don't know where to go for my senior practicum should I go for Emergency Department or ICU? I want to be competent enough in all my skills, and ER nursing seems so exciting and challenging for me. On the other hand, should I learn my basic nursing skills first that ICU presents me with? Next, with the grace of God, I pass my NCLEX and get my RN next to my name, should I go straight to ER nursing? I've read mixed thoughts about it. Some hospitals do accept newly grads in the emergency department (because they can mold them in orientation), others want experience for in the floor. I want to know anyone's thoughts and advice about my issue. If you're going through the same situation as I am, comment as well! Thank you!
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