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curlygirlie3

curlygirlie3

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curlygirlie3's Latest Activity

  1. curlygirlie3

    Did I make the right move?

    Yesterday marked 3 months for me as a working NP. I can sympathize with the way you feel. I am completely overwhelmed by the amount of work and responsibility...and I have a good mentor! I second guess my decision to change careers every Sunday night. Despite this, I just keep telling myself that things will become more fluid as I gain experience. My charting will be faster and maybe won't have to be done EVERY night and on the weekends, I will become more confident in myself, and I will build my NP network of speciality "phone-a-friends". I suppose only time will tell. I do remember how I felt as a new RN on a busy surgical/trauma unit; it was a difficult role transition as well (though the change to an NP is certainly more intense). I wish you luck, patience, a good mentor, a great support staff, and slower weekends!
  2. curlygirlie3

    Working before credentialing

    Really no different than a student seeing patients, reporting to a preceptor, and collaborating on a plan...except I get paid. She does not see patients at the same time, but instead works on administrative duties.
  3. curlygirlie3

    Working before credentialing

    I am doing this now in NC. My boss is an NP as well. I see and document on all the patients, we agree on a plan before the patients leave. She is always in the building and signs all the charts. It is a bit of a slog because we don't always agree on treatment...not right/wrong, just different approaches. However, nice to get paid and have a built in check for a new NP like myself while waiting for the darn insurance companies.
  4. curlygirlie3

    Those who have done distance learning

    Just finished up an online MSN-FNP through Duke University. The online didactic portions were nice. I liked listening to lectures in my PJs! Physical assessment skills were taught on campus and each speciality course had at least 1-2 days on campus per semester. I think you HAVE to have that in person component for a clinical degree. We also saw standardized patients and were taped doing so to review with the faculty. I also recommend finding a program that assigns preceptors and clinical sites for you...that part was invaluable to me. I was a little sad at my lack of connection with the university, so for my elective, I went on a short-term medical outreach with the school...problem solved!
  5. curlygirlie3

    AANP FNP 2017 *Pass*

    Hello All! I have been creeping on this site for the past several weeks as I prepared to take the AANP-FNP exam today. I have a prelim result of PASS which I am very happy about. Thanks to all who posted their tips. Here was my study routine... I spent about 3 weeks 4-6 hours each day studying. I used 2 books, Fitzgerald and Liek. Both were helpful in different ways, but Liek helped me most with cardiac murmurs! I also took 2 diagnostic tests in the final week before my test, 1 from Barkley and 1 from APEA. I definitely recommend the APEA one. The online format was better AND there were a couple of questions on my actual exam that were word-for-word from APEA. I was a little worried about my antibiotic knowledge, but I knew my treatments for STI and that was crucial. There were too many peds questions for my liking, but I suffered through. I was happy that there were not any tricky questions. Everything was straight forward. My other strategy was to go ahead and schedule my test quickly (I graduated May 14, tested June 2). This forced me to study and allowed my most recent synthesis clinical knowledge to remain fresh in my brain. You won't ever feel ready..don't over think things. Remember, you just spent the last couple to several years or more preparing for this. Now...lets hope this prelim result is correct!
  6. I am currently part-time clinical faculty at my ADN alma mater. I love leading the students around, watching them perform skills, and explaining new concepts. I also used to tutor ADN students before I started with clinical rotations. Recently, I was accepted into the Duke University FNP program. I choose FNP because I want the advanced clinical knowledge and the option to continue to interact with a patient population. I think I would be interested in entering the nursing education field at some point, but I would want to give my students the best education possible. My questions to all you lovely nurse educators out there are: Do you work with educators who have NP degrees? Are they at a big disadvantage when it comes to lecturing or designing a lesson plan? What are your thoughts?
  7. curlygirlie3

    Duke University's online FNP program, Fall 2014

    I chose Duke because they have many more clinical hours than the UNC system schools that I looked at. One NICU and one peds nurse that I know are in the program and have no complaints. It is also nice that they select a clinical site for you. Other schools make you find your own sites. Best of luck making your decision.
  8. curlygirlie3

    Clinical Instructor Advice

    I started out by tutoring at my ADN alma mater after I graduated. Once I obtained my BSN, the ADN program asked me to lead a clinical group. My advice is make connections at the program that you graduated from. Also, find another nurse where you work who does clinicals. You will often find that people aren't willing to do it because it IS another 12 hour shift per week plus a whole stack of paperwork to rummage through each week. Finally - buy a red pen.
  9. curlygirlie3

    Duke University's online FNP program, Fall 2014

    I sent off my check yesterday. Goodbye money, hello future! Congrats to all of my new classmates. To those of you still waiting to hear or declined - I am so sorry. I hope you are already plotting your next move!
  10. curlygirlie3

    Duke University's online FNP program, Fall 2014

    Thanks for the update silva. Maybe now my patients will have my full attention. Lol
  11. curlygirlie3

    Duke University's online FNP program, Fall 2014

    This morning I am grateful for: 1. Going back to work, because it's a distraction. 2. Having this thread and all of you to commiserate with me. No one else understands why I am a little crazy right now!
  12. curlygirlie3

    Duke University's online FNP program, Fall 2014

    Every time my phone dings with my email tone - it sets my heart to racing!
  13. curlygirlie3

    Caring Vicariously

    Thank you all for your kind words. My grandmother died yesterday. She is square-dancing in heaven with my grandfather.
  14. curlygirlie3

    Caring Vicariously

    It has been two weeks since I found out that my grandmother was in the hospital, ten days since her surgery, five days since I last spoke to her, four days since she moved to hospice, two days since the last time she was awake. For 81 years my grandmother has been a vibrant, healthy woman. Bike riding, swimming, square dancing, crafting, and enjoying time with her boyfriend filled her days in her small Florida retirement community. She must have known that she was sick. Colon cancer does not reach stage IV without a person experiencing symptoms. Waiting, ignoring, and deferring treatment was her choice; I respect that. The difficulty comes with the swiftness of decline - a sudden drop on the carnival ride that leaves one's heart in their throat. As a nurse, as a granddaughter, and as a person I want to be there for her. I want to swab her dry lips, arrange her pillows, and hold her hand. The gulf between me and her bedside is filled with geography, time, money, and obligations to my family and work. The guilt at not being there to care for her is enormous. After all, I work with cancer patients daily. I do all of the things that I want to do for her for strangers. Wait...I do it for strangers. Another family recently experienced a profound loss. I first met Ms. Smith when she was recovering from cancer surgery on my unit. She was beautiful, kind, generous, and funny. She was a gentle soul and I could tell that she had worked with children for most of her life. When I meet patients like her, my fondest hope is that I will never see them again. Don't take that the wrong way. If I don't see them it means that they are doing well. Ms. Smith was readmitted to the unit more times than I can remember with complications from her treatment. Despite losing her hair, appetite, and eventually her physical mobility, she never lost the qualities that made her so special to the staff and so loved by her family. In her last days I was her nurse. I swabbed her lips, I kept her dry, and I gave her medications to keep her comfortable. When she passed I paid my last respects as I placed her in the shroud. Unsurprisingly Ms. Smith has been on my mind for the past two weeks. I believe my memories of caring for her are helping me cope with the fact that I cannot be there for my own grandmother. I also believe that there is a nurse somewhere in Florida who is caring for my grandmother in the same way that he/she would care for their own family member. Providing nursing care for the sick and dying requires a sort of suspended reality. That is not a stranger in that bed, that is your mother, father, grandparent, or child. As a profession we have a collective belief in the Golden Rule. This belief may be tested daily by the stresses of the job but we must never let it waiver. Somewhere out there a family member is holding out hope that you are treating their loved one as your own. To every nurse that reads this, please keep the belief in the Golden Rule alive because, one day, as I have, you may find yourself in a similar situation.
  15. curlygirlie3

    Caring Vicariously

    It has been two weeks since I found out that my grandmother was in the hospital, ten days since her surgery, five days since I last spoke to her, four days since she moved to hospice, two days since the last time she was awake. For 81 years my grandmother has been a vibrant, healthy woman. Bike riding, swimming, square dancing, crafting, and enjoying time with her boyfriend filled her days in her small Florida retirement community. She must have known that she was sick. Colon cancer does not reach stage IV without a person experiencing symptoms. Waiting, ignoring, and deferring treatment was her choice; I respect that. The difficulty comes with the swiftness of decline - a sudden drop on the carnival ride that leaves one's heart in their throat. As a nurse, as a granddaughter, and as a person I want to be there for her. I want to swab her dry lips, arrange her pillows, and hold her hand. The gulf between me and her bedside is filled with geography, time, money, and obligations to my family and work. The guilt at not being there to care for her is enormous. After all, I work with cancer patients daily. I do all of the things that I want to do for her for strangers. Wait...I do it for strangers. Another family recently experienced a profound loss. I first met Ms. Smith when she was recovering from cancer surgery on my unit. She was beautiful, kind, generous, and funny. She was a gentle soul and I could tell that she had worked with children for most of her life. When I meet patients like her, my fondest hope is that I will never see them again. Don't take that the wrong way. If I don't see them it means that they are doing well. Ms. Smith was readmitted to the unit more times than I can remember with complications from her treatment. Despite losing her hair, appetite, and eventually her physical mobility, she never lost the qualities that made her so special to the staff and so loved by her family. In her last days I was her nurse. I swabbed her lips, I kept her dry, and I gave her medications to keep her comfortable. When she passed I paid my last respects as I placed her in the shroud. Unsurprisingly Ms. Smith has been on my mind for the past two weeks. I believe my memories of caring for her are helping me cope with the fact that I cannot be there for my own grandmother. I also believe that there is a nurse somewhere in Florida who is caring for my grandmother in the same way that he/she would care for their own family member. Providing nursing care for the sick and dying requires a sort of suspended reality. That is not a stranger in that bed, that is your mother, father, grandparent, or child. As a profession, we have a collective belief in the Golden Rule. This belief may be tested daily by the stresses of the job but we must never let it waiver. Somewhere out there a family member is holding out hope that you are treating their loved one as your own. To every nurse that reads this, please keep the belief in the Golden Rule alive because, one day, as I have, you may find yourself in a similar situation.
  16. Tell the HUC "If I'm not out in ten minutes..."