Jump to content

rosomebody007

Member Member
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 19

    Content

  • 1

    Articles

  • 1,780

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

rosomebody007's Latest Activity

  1. rosomebody007

    The Blue Hair Nurse

    A friend and ex coworker posted on facebook about how much she has been criticized by her superiors at the hospital for her new hairdo... She decided to get a new hair color: blue... Unconventional color in the conservative nursing system in Panama where nurses wear nice caps, white uniforms, and long white stockings. Although I truly believe in the right of expression of every human being, nurses have to take care of their image and honor. Hair color has to do nothing with skills, clinical judgement, decision making, and teaching...But credibility. Any thoughts about hairdos and the use of fantasy hair colors by nurses???? Any thoughts???
  2. rosomebody007

    Bullying in the Workplace

    I work at a community clinic that attends walking patients during the weekend. I do not like to be in charge, the assistants and LPNs that work in the same shift with me have this tendency of trying to make me look bad. If I take too long dealing with a phone call, they criticize me. If I am documenting the call, I am criticized because I can not take a third call. If the phone rings and I can not get the call because I am with a patient, I am criticized as well. They do not yell at me, but they could talk to each other loud enough for me hear them insinuating that I do not do my job. Weekends at my work place are very busy and hectic, I am considering to drop them because I do not want to work with those people. However, isn't it what the want????
  3. BuckyBadger, When I decided to write about this topic was because I have done my research and experienced by first hand all the process and visa information.
  4. Silverdragon, Thank you for your positive thought.
  5. IAMNOMAD, I have heard about plenty of nurses from the Philippines in this area. As you said, we have to seek for the right information before daydream in what would or would not happen.
  6. Well Pegkyzina... I obviously was not thinking thoroughly. If I had thought about it, I would have never left the hospital in my country to see the world...
  7. Hello Esme, Thank you for the link. Again, that is the point that I want to present. The reality of employment for foreign nurses. With a 47% of unemployment among new graduates, it does not make any sense to believe that a foreign has an opportunity. About the immigrant law, it is like energy... It is in constant transformation.
  8. Hello Notdoneyet, I think nurses have a wonderful personality. I understand very well your position as a citizen and as a nurse. However, if this information does not reach the dreamers, the reality of nursing employment in the United States will never be understood.
  9. Hello Beshacohen, It does make sense. As you said I don't want to compete with my friends either.
  10. Hi Nola, There is nothing unempathetic about your comment. That is the point that I am trying to make with this article. The country has highly trained professionals in the nursing field that are struggling because they have not been able to find a job. My intention with this article is not evoke feelings of pity for me or any other foreign trained nurse. I have to accept my reality and I am working towards it. My solely intention is to let other foreign nurses to know that it is a difficult task for everyone, and clear off the myth of the fruitful land.
  11. Hello BuckyBadgerRN, I consider that nursing has plenty of myths that should be cleared off. As you said, it is difficult for an American nurse to find an employment opportunity in the country. The hospitals, homes, and other medical centers want nurses with more than one or two years of experience in nursing. This is sad! It seems that no one wants a new graduate nurse o a foreign nurse. In regard to the illegal vs legal aliens and the nursing jobs, there is a new immigration law that gives benefits to illegal immigrants who have been in the country. Thus, if a foreign nurse fits in that immigration category and qualify for that benefit it is more likely that she can make it rather than a foreign student who has follow ALL the legal steps and respected all the immigration laws. More detailed information about this can be found in the USCIS web site. This explain my line about "Immigration laws change constantly and are not fair..." We nurses have a HUGE work ahead of us in education. We have to educate our folks that things in nursing are as tough as in any other field and as an old science nursing is full of myths.
  12. Hello Kipahni, I went through the credential evaluation process by the CGFNS and my credentials from my country are equal to an BSN in the US. Thus, I can infer that my country offers the same education that the US do. I also passed the NCLEX RN examination in the state of NH two months ago. What varies is the nursing organization ( Nurse Practitioner, RN, LPN, LNA... We dont have LPN in my country, nurses carry on those activities), the laws in nursing, and the different jobs that a nurse can do here. The technology is a huge deal though. However, as far as I understand a foreign nurse is treated as a new graduate nurse regardless how many years of experience she has, the nurse will be new in a new place, consequently she must be re trained. Thank you for your comment Kipahni
  13. I have never heard so many "nos" as I did today. For the first time in these four years I felt that I have been the biggest fool on Earth. I am a foreign nurse form Panama trying to get a job in the United States. Many people say, "There are plenty of jobs for nurses in the United States", "Bilingual? They'll eat you up! That's a plus!". However, there is something that people do not say about the reality of employment for foreign nurses in this country. If a foreign nurse is not proficient in English, a citizen or a green card holder, and does not have a sponsor, the likelihood that she gets a job in the country is one in a trillion. In every employment opportunity that I have applied the requirements state "excellent speaking and writing skills" How can one know if her English skills are good enough for a job? The Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) states in the VisaScreen Visa Credentials Assessment Application Handbook that "You must take a series of English proficiency tests approved for your profession" (if your instruction was given in English, you do not have to present these exams). The exams that determine one's English proficiency are the TOEFL iBT (internet based test) and the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Also, this handbook provides a chart with the TOEFL iBT required scores for Registered Nurses which are 83 as total and 26 in the speaking section (VisaScreen Application Handbook 3). Thus, if one want to get a job as a bilingual nurse, you must speak English very well. In addition to the language nightmare, the fact that you are an alien with a Bachelor in Nursing Sciences does not guarantee that you will get your dream job. In order to apply for a job in the United States, one must be a citizen, a permanent resident, or have a "work visa" or H1-B. Without them, it is legally impossible to be considered as a candidate for a position where you might fit well. Although the word "H1-B Visa" might seem the light at the end of the tunnel, it is not so easy to get it. The nurse needs a sponsor or employer willing to go through all the immigration process with her. Unfortunately, many companies are no longer offering sponsorship opportunities for foreign trained nurses and the ones who do it, are very selective with the person that they are hiring. Moreover, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services or USCIS has a "limited number of H1-B visas" that can be given per year. The question remains, why no one ever say these three aspects to a foreign trained nurse? Why working in the United States is the best kept secret in nursing overseas? Maybe the reason behind this secret is that not many nurses have gotten to this point where every door seems to be closed. The information about this topic is very limited, immigration laws change constantly and are not fair with those who can contribute positively to the country. In addition, people are not familiarized with the right procedures required in this long process. I feel that my dream is fading away and it deeply hurts me. I can do nothing about it, but tell everyone that the reality is not what people are saying here or in your country. It is not easy to find a nursing job in the United States. Resources U.S. Immigration Services - An easy-to-use, plain English, do-it-yourself on-line service to prepare and complete the U.S. citizenship application. CGFNS International - CGFNS International serves the global healthcare community by providing a comprehensive suite of credential assessment products to meet specific needs. As a trusted source for over 35 years, healthcare professionals and organizations rely on our expertise to deliver accurate and dependable service.
  14. I have never heard so many "nos" as I did today. For the first time in these four years I felt that I have been the biggest fool on Earth. I am a foreign nurse form Panama trying to get a job in the United States. Many people say, "There are plenty of jobs for nurses in the United States", "Bilingual? They'll eat you up! That's a plus!". However, there is something that people do not say about the reality of employment for foreign nurses in this country. If a foreign nurse is not proficient in English, a citizen or a green card holder, and does not have an sponsor, the likelihood that she gets a job in the country is one in a trillion. In every employment opportunity that I have applied the requirements state "excellent speaking and writing skills" How can one know if her English skills are good enough for a job? The Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) states in the VisaScreen Visa Credentials Assessment Application Handbook that "You must take a series of English proficiency tests approved for your profession" (if your instruction was given in English, you do not have to present these exams). The exams that determine one's English proficiency are the TOEFL iBT (internet based test) and the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Also, this handbook provides a chart with the TOEFL iBT required scores for Registered Nurses which are 83 as total and 26 in the speaking section (VisaScreen Application Handbook 3). Thus, if one want to get a job as a bilingual nurse, you must speak English very well. In addition to the language nightmare, the fact that you are an alien with a Bachelor in Nursing Sciences does not guarantee that you will get your dream job. In order to apply for a job in the United States, one must be a citizen, a permanent resident, or have a "work visa" or H1-B. Without them, it is legally impossible to be considered as a candidate for a position where you might fit well. Although the word "H1-B Visa" might seem the light at the end of the tunnel, it is not so easy to get it. The nurse needs an sponsor or employer willing to go trough all the immigration process with her. Unfortunately, many companies are not longer offering sponsorship opportunities for foreign trained nurses and the ones who do it, are very selective with the person that they are hiring. Moreover, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services or USCIS has a "limited number of H1-B visas" that can be given per year. The question remains, why no one ever say these three aspects to a foreign trained nurse? Why working in the United States is the best kept secret in nursing overseas? Maybe the reason behind this secret is that not many nurses have gotten to this point where every door seems to be closed. The information about this topic is very limited, immigration laws change constantly and are not fair with those who can contribute positively to the country. In addition, people are not familiarized with the right procedures required in this long process. I feel that my dream is fading away and it deeply hurts me. I can do nothing about it, but tell everyone that the reality is not what people are saying here or in your country. It is not easy to find a nursing job in the United States.
  15. rosomebody007

    NCLEX Test post NEW California BreEZe System

    Hi Deedee! I am really happy that I saw your post. I have been waiting for my results since the day I presented my exam ( Sept 24). I took my exam in the state of NH which does not have the quick results service and PV does not let you buy it. I did not know that one can look in that web site for its license... I tried it using the state information and there appeared that I have an active license! Nothing has come in the mail though... Thank you for your post! It really made my night!
  16. rosomebody007

    Has anyone waited more than three weeks?

    I took the NCLEX RN on September 24 in the state of New Hampshire. I was not aware about the NHBON does not allow the quick result service, thus I could not buy the service. It has been three weeks since I took it and I have not heard about my results. I could not do the PV trick either. The majority here has taken the NCLEX RN and knows the feeling of waiting for the results... If you waited for two or three days feeling in limbo, picture yourself waiting for three weeks! My exam stopped at question 75, which does not mean that I passed the exam. I am getting blue just by thinking in this exam and the possible outcomes. I have read about folks who took their exam in states bigger than this (NH) and within two weeks got their results! I on lye ant to move on with my emotional process... If I passed I want to celebrate and make a big fiesta... If I failed. I want to grieve and move on.