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Stella_Blue

Stella_Blue

Emergency Nursing
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Stella_Blue specializes in Emergency Nursing.

I started out as a LPN in 2012. I then obtained my ASN 2 years later, and my BSN about 2 years after that. I then slowly moved my way to my dream job of the emergency room. It took me almost 3 years, but I never gave up. I worked LTC for a few months, as well as a cardiac/progressive care unit. My PCU unit specialized in PCI interventions, so I naturally love cardiac workups in the ER. I eventually plan on obtaining my CNS, but this is a 10-15 year goal for me.

Stella_Blue's Latest Activity

  1. Stella_Blue

    Constantly being put in triage or fast track

    A PCC is what our charge nurses are called. I have tried something along these lines with them and the manager, but it just feels like I'm a broken record. I generally get "well these are our needs at the moment so this is the assignment you get." In retrospect I will see them change assignments for other nurses so they can not spend so much time in triage especially.
  2. So let me just start off by saying that I do work the 1300 to 0100 shift, so I understand that this in itself is half the issue, but I am constantly either working triage or fast track. I hardly ever get a room assignment in the main ER. There are other nurses who work my shift who do not experience this to the level that I do. It has gotten to the point where I now am starting to keep a log and will present it to my manager when I feel I have enough data. Has anyone else experienced this? I feel it's one particular PCC who always sends me away, as others tend to be more fair with me. Advice on what to do. If I wanted triage or FT all the time I would get a clinic job.
  3. Stella_Blue

    Propofol administration by ER RN

    I'm my ER (Indiana) nurses are not allowed to bolus propofol for sedation. It must be pushed by a physician. We can push any other sedation med but propofol. We can manage and start drips, just no bolus.
  4. It's that time in my career when I think I might be coming to a major crossroads, but I'm so conflicted. Here is some background. I've been an RN for 5 years, I was an LPN for 2 years prior to that, and a CNA for several years before all of that. All of those years combined I've worked some type of bedside for almost 11 years. Fastforwad to today. I work in a small, but very busy ER. My dream job. It took me many trials and tribulations to get to the ER, and I still love the ER as a unit. As a matter of fact I'll probably never work any other acute care unit. I've been in my ER for almost 2 years. However, recently I can just feel that burnout approaching. Its unlike anything I've every really experienced before. I find myself withdrawing a little more and more at work. I'm starting to make mistakes, and then these keep me full of disgust with myself on all my days off. Theres been a major shift in management at work and it just seems as if everything is changing for the worse. No need to explain to you guys, you know the scenario (not enough staff, taking away incentive pay, more mandatory educational requirements, ect.) So this leads me to a very difficult decision...leave bedside now or tough it out and hope for a brighter day? I applied for 2 jobs today, but I highly doubt I'll hear anything as they are very sought after. My other question is, do I finally have enough ER experience to hop back in if I want to come back. It took me almost 3 years to get an ER gig and I dont want to jump those hoops again. I work with great nurses (for the most part) and even better doctors, but I can just feel my gut telling me something. Sorry for such a long post, but I have no nurse friends and no nurse family. No one understands 😔
  5. Stella_Blue

    right med, right dose, wrong route... ouchhhh

    In my ER all of our IM epi comes in a small anaphylactic kit that contains the vial of epi, dosages by weight chart (although almost always 0.3), syringe, and an IM needle in a prepared kit. You literally pull it out under anaphylaxis kit in the Pyxis. I feel like this is a nice setup for this reason.
  6. Stella_Blue

    Non-licensed staff documenting in Code Blue/Trauma Code

    Our house supervisor documents codes in our hospital. This is for the ER and for the floor. The ER docs do not respond to floor codes or rapid responses anymore, but house has always documented even when they did.
  7. Stella_Blue

    Unfair Scheduling

    Often times that's just how nursing can be. I've worked jobs where we have been in mandatory over time for almost a year. It sucks but it's the nature of the beast. That job then is the reason I never pick up any extra shifts now, it burnt me on OT.
  8. Stella_Blue

    RN's and LPN's working as Nursing Assistants?

    Every once in a blue moon CNA work for a shift is nice. It gives my brain a break. I always say CNA work is physically demanding and nurse work is mentally demanding. When I worked in a nursing home and would be assigned as an aide, I always felt relief when the nurses had an admission or something and I was simply toileting someone =)
  9. Stella_Blue

    Switching Depts

    It took me 2 years to finally land my ED job. I was finally able to transfer about 6 months ago. Luckily I had some help. A friend of mine put in a good word for me, plus my persistent applications finally landed me an interview. Then once I got the interview I flat out told the manager that of he didnt hire me I would continue to apply until he did lol. I applied and interviewed for several ED's before I finally landed this gig though, so dont give up. I worked 2 years on a PCU floor prior.
  10. Stella_Blue

    Is it a HIPAA violation?

    So tonight I go into work to find out that one of our regulars was brutally murdered. It was all over the internet and the news. It was a very sad situation. Anyway I was texting a coworker and I happened to ask her if she heard what happened to so and so. She said no who is that. I said he was a regular we get up here a lot. I then told her what people were saying on the internet about the attack and stuff. She then said ok but this convo never happened between us because we could get fired. This was already all over the news and internet. The only thing I had said was he was a regular patient we get often. It was the talk of the whole hospital tonight it seemed because a lot of us knew him. I am just worried now that I could potentially get in trouble. She said not to mention the convo to anyone but I did mention to a coworker that she did not remeber him. Should I be worried?
  11. Stella_Blue

    Two residents have refused my care

    Patients will fire you. It happens. Not everyone will like you. Its something you have to get over to work in this field. Oh and btw not answering a call light because the patient is not on your "assignment" is totally uncalled for. Everyone should be answering call lights regardless of assignments. Assignments are given out to tell which aide should bath who, get ready for bed, or dinner, NOT whos call light you should or shouldn't answer.
  12. Stella_Blue

    New RN making mistakes?

    Chin up buttercup these are simple and common mistakes that we all have made. We learn from oir mistakes and we move on. I always say that I I always learn from the train wrecks and not the easy patients and I always learn after I have made and error. That is just the way it is. As long as no one is hurt amd you walk away learning from it, then it will be ok.
  13. Stella_Blue

    Got my ADN & still jobless

    I had the same issue as you did. I eventually broke down and had to go to a a LTC faciltiy for about a year before I landed my critical care job in the hospital. I looked for months and months with no luck, so I feel your pain. I am a few classes away from my BSN now luckily! One good thing I can finally say now (I would have never admitted it when I was there) was that the LTC taught me amazing time management, med pass, rapid assessment, medication knowledge, oh and did I say time management skills. So try to look at the silver lining, you may not get the job you want right away, but that job will always be there. I was pretty devastated at first, but now after a year at my CC job I can really see where the LTC experiance helped.
  14. Stella_Blue

    Got my ADN & still jobless

    I had the same issue as you did. I eventually broke down and had to go to a a LTC faciltiy for about a year before I landed my critical care job in the hospital. I looked for months and months with no luck, so I feel your pain. I am a few classes away from my BSN now luckily! One good thing I can finally say now (I would have never admitted it when I was there) was that the LTC taught me amazing time management, med pass, rapid assessment, medication knowledge, oh and did I say time management skills. So try to look at the silver lining, you may not get the job you want right away, but that job will always be there. I was pretty devastated at first, but now after a year at my CC job I can really see where the LTC experiance helped.
  15. Stella_Blue

    Cardiac unit for the new grad.. good idea?

    I too was a LPN for about 3 years before I started out on a cardiac critical care unit. I have been there for about 10 months now and so far I am really liking it. When I first left nursing school I loathed cardiac, but now Im in love. My question though is this more of a critical floor or a tele floor? That is a very high ratio. My floor is 3:1 on days and 4:1 on nights. We manage things such as many types of drips and pressers, we are the only floor other than ICU that gets anything post cath lab, STEMI & NSTEMI, CABGs after a few days post op, and so on. I would be a bit scared to titrate a neo drip, hang blood, and receive a fresh post cath all at once and still have 1 or 2 more patients to manage.
  16. Stella_Blue

    sneakers/shoes

    I alternate between a pair of Danskos and a pair of Brooks running shoes. A vast majority of people I work with wear Brooks. Very comfy out of the box.
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