Jump to content
tinyRN72

tinyRN72 BSN

Cardiovascular Stepdown

Content by tinyRN72

  1. I ended up turning the job down, but I will try to answer your question. It's a bit broad. One thing that I would expect is they always treat patients with kindness. We all have bad days, but the people we care for should not know that we are having a bad day. I would expect my nurses to work as a team and let know if they are having a problem. I can get them help or would help myself. This makes the day better for everyone. If one person is struggling, I would expect others to help out. Everyone will have one of those days, and we can all work together to make it better. I would expect people to avoid using their phones for private use. They are great for looking things up, but should not be used to check in on social media, chat with friends or personal phone calls while working. These are the first things that come to mind. Do you have a specific question?
  2. I have never worked in a rehab, nor have I had a management role in nursing. I was in management for years before nursing. I feel comfortable taking a supervisor role, but I really don't know what to expect. Can anyone offer insight about this type of job? The fact that it is in a nursing home leaves me uncertain about the job specifics. Thank you in advance!
  3. My career has been marked by one main constant - change! Can change really be constant? Read my story and decide for yourself. I started my career as a home health nurse. I was really happy with it for a while because I got to spend one-on-one time with my patient and I made (what I considered at the time) good money. But after about a year, I was looking for something else. Home health nursing was wearing me and my car out. I was putting about 600 miles on my car every week and I was working about 80 hours a day. My poor husband told me, "I feel like I live alone because you are either at work or working at home." And he was right! I had a huge territory, and I saw 7-10 patients a day. I was constantly being asked to pick up extra work because there were not enough RNs. This got old, and besides, I became a nurse to work in a hospital. This led me to my second job: working on a cardiac step-down unit. I loved this too! My job was 10 minutes from home, I didn't have to bring home any paperwork or documentation, and (what a privilege!) I was given health insurance and paid time off. I thought I was in heaven (again). So what happened? I was working with some really snooty nurses who didn't like new people at all, it seemed. This made me feel sort of lonely for 36 hours a week, and my pay actually went down. My husband and I had always wanted to do travel nursing, so I got signed up with an agency and off we went! That was a really fun time in life, filled with so many adventures, good pay and more choices. Travel nursing is full of change: a new hospital every 13 weeks. This was good for me. I guess I'm sort of gypsy at heart. I loved moving around all the time. I loved the change. Every new place was a new start and by the time I started being temperamental about the hospital, it was time to go and start over again. What could possibly go wrong, you ask? Well, living in an RV or a hotel most of the time started feeling cramped. I missed my (grown) kids because I was away from home so much of the time, and about this time I was also feeling really burned out in hospitals. To give myself a new change, I decided to go back to home health. Here is my current problem. Working in home health requires being available 5 days a week to make enough money. I thought it would be a good trade-off for the reduced stress compared to the stress level I was feeling hospitals. But it has been less than 6 months and already I am tired of working 12 hour days 5 days a week. I am tired of having to call doctor's offices on my days off. I am tired of working all day in the field only to come home and have to document, answer emails, call patients to set up my next day, and I'm tired of being tired. I miss having 4 days off every week. Yes, I have applied and been offered another hospital job. Will this make me happy this time? I sure do hope so. Before the comments start - I have considered other types of nursing. I have looked at and applied to many non-hospital and home health jobs. Unfortunately, I have not been able to get an interview for a single one. Additionally, I really do love 3-12s, and I have only seen that in hospitals. I realize that I am going to have to accept the fact that no job is going to be perfect. I think I've done that. I hope I've done that. If I am to be 100% honest here, I know that working for myself is the only answer that is going to make me feel satisfied in the long run... and I am working on it
  4. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    I've applied with insurance companies a couple of times. I got an interview, but not the job.
  5. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    You are correct! Home health is full of this type of behavior! These are great suggestions, thank you.
  6. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    That was a great way of expressing some of the things I have feeling. I have one offer on the table now. It is not my dream position - med/surgery after years of cardiac step down? They would not train me in ER or ICU, even though I would be quick turn around to independent in either of these positions. However, I also applied for a supervisor job at a SNF/rehab. They called after I got the other offer, and I interviewed today. I am expecting an offer.... I am not sure how I will chose. AND I don't want to burn the bridge to the first place. Oh, why can't I just win the lottery... Then I could just go around volunteering to what I want when I want it! Lol
  7. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    Thanks to both of you. I know that can not works PEDs. I solute every nurse who does because you must be an angel. My heart would just break too much. I know job changes are not good. I don't think the travel part hurts, because that is the definition of the job. However, looking for a new job after only a few months isn't helping me. I have to though... Not getting enough hours. To further complicate things, I have an interview today which is only going to confuse me if offered the job... I will have a hard time choosing between the two offers. But, I'm going anyway.. so it's all on me.
  8. tinyRN72

    July 2019 Caption Contest: Win $100!

    Oh sorry,but you've hit the 1 hour limit on uninterrupted sleep!
  9. tinyRN72

    July 2019 Caption Contest: Win $100!

    Excuse me, I didn't get in report whether or not you want to be waken for pain meds.
  10. tinyRN72

    Combat Fatigue

    I agree with many of the others here... Diet and exercise, but here are some tips I haven't seen yet: 1) How much sugar do you eat? It might sound strange, but cutting sugar increases energy levels for a lot of people. 2) How are you timing your meals? Do you eat breakfast? Do you go hungry all day at work? If so, it might help to have several small snacks during your shift, especially if you work 12s. 3) Quality of food is ready important. Are you getting enough veggies, fruit and healthy protein? A little more information would be helpful. Feel free to send me a pm if you like. What labs were done exactly? Did they check your thyroid and A1C?
  11. I have often been asked what travel nursing is like and here is my answer: “Travel nursing is a wonderful, adventurous, lonely, miserable, exciting, stress-inducing job that is not for the faint at heart, but so fabulous!” I actually did say just that to a class of nursing students who invited me to be a guest speaker recently, and I believe that every word is true. Understandably, this description might sound crazy to you, but allow me to explain. I planned to be a travel nurse from the time I enrolled in nursing school. I knew that I needed to get two years of experience under my belt, so I took the first job that I could with that two-year goal in mind. I got my RN license in January of 2013, and I left home for my first travel gig on January 1, 2015. Life after that was a whirlwind of adventure, constantly starting over, and searching for a new job every 13 weeks. But it was also so great! I am here to tell you what it is really like to work as a travel nurse, and how to prepare if you would like to take on this unique position. As stated before, you need two years of experience. In some cases, any experience will do. I worked in home health for one year, and I worked in a hospital on a cardiovascular step-down unit for one year. My first travel assignment was on a medical / surgical overflow unit. This job was easy to get, but my experience didn’t quite prepare me for what I was getting into. I went from a nurse to patient ratio of 1:4, but then jumped into a new position where I suddenly had to learn how to juggle 7 patients with 7 different diagnoses. Needless to say, I was overwhelmed, but I stuck it out and learned how to adapt. I recommend getting a full two years experience in a hospital before taking a travel assignment, and I also suggest that you take a travel job in a similar unit at first. This will give you time to adjust to the challenges of being a travel nurse. The one year of experience that I had in cardiovascular step-down was enough to land travel jobs in this area, which I have done as often as possible, but I can’t go into any level higher than this because no hospital wants to train a travel nurse, which brings me to the next topic. In short, travel nurses get little to no training or orientation. That first assignment gave me a full week of hospital orientation, just like all their other new employees. On the unit, I was only given 2 days of orientation, which I later found out was a lot. As a travel nurse, you are expected to be ready to go almost upon arrival. I have been given as much as 2 days of unit orientation and as little as 4 hours. This time is intended to give you time to learn the documentation system, and pretty much nothing else. You are expected to be proficient in the department that you are contracted to work on. The first week or two are always sort of rough because you must learn where everything is located; you have to get acquainted with new doctors and other staff; you need time to get used to a new EMAR, and you must look up every hospital policy for everything you do. It is challenging, but I found that I got better at it with every assignment. Because travel nurses are meant to be a quick fix to staffing shortages, you will not be trained in a new unit. So, if you hope to work in the ER, get that training before you start to travel. The same is true with ICU, pre/post-op, cath lab, and any other specialty. The only way to get a hospital to train you in these areas is to take a full-time job and plan to work there for a while. I may have given a glum impression of travel nursing up to now, but there are some big reasons why travel nursing is completely wonderful. First, you get paid well, in most cases. Travel nurses help hospitals in times of staffing need, and they pay a premium for this. Because you must travel away from home, your compensation includes room and board reimbursement. This part of your pay is tax-free, so you get to keep more of your paycheck. The pay can be a bit confusing at first because there are several factors to consider. You need to make enough money to keep your bills paid, and you need to cover a place to stay while on assignment. While most agencies offer to provide you with a furnished apartment or hotel, I found that taking the stipend and making my own living arraignments to be more profitable. Some companies will try to underpay you, so you must do your homework before you sign the contract. Make sure that you research what housing will cost and be sure to negotiate with any hotel that you may want to use. You will be there for 13 weeks or more, so you can usually get a pretty nice discount. Another reason (my favorite) that travel nursing is great is that you get to travel. Imagine being on vacation all the time! That is what I felt like. I worked my 3 days per week, but on my days off, I was in an all-new area to explore. Travel nursing allowed me to see new parts of the country and make good money while doing so. Do you have a dream destination? Travel nursing will allow you to immerse yourself there for over 3 months! My husband and I had so much fun during our travel nursing years. Travel nursing also allows you to get exposure to many different people, hospitals, working styles, and ways of doing things. You get to meet people all over the country and many will become lifelong friends. Though I have had some lonely experiences where the staff was “cold” to travelers, most places welcomed me open heartedly. One other downside to travel nursing is the uncertainty of the next assignment. I mostly traveled to areas where I could spend time with my family, so I was always looking for very specific areas to work in. For this reason, I often didn’t know if I would be working until the last minute. For people who just want the adventure of traveling the country, this will not be such a challenge. For me, it was stressful at times, but more flexibility on my part would have remedied this easily. I loved the 5 years I spent as a travel nurse, even with the challenges that come with it. Sometimes I want to take a new contract again (which I can do any time I want). I grew as a nurse by being exposed to so many different hospitals. I also learned to be self-reliant, adaptable, and open to new experiences. I have experience with just about every EMAR there is, and I know that I could learn a new one quickly. I have met wonderful people and seen wonderful places. If you have the itch to try out travel nursing, I highly suggest that you go for it! One last tidbit: if you are worried about getting to a new assignment and hating it, the motto of the travel nurse is: "I can put up with anything for 13 weeks, 12 hours at a time." I hope that this was helpful to those who want to know the truth about travel nursing. Happy travels!
  12. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Well, it can be hard. Some people arrange a "roommate" situation, where they have a low rent commitment, or "live with family", pay low rent, but are never there. Honestly, some, just take the risk and make the money without having a true tax home. A good travel agency will want to document your tax home. Some do it by working just at the 50 mile marker, so that they are technically legal but can still go home every night.. but this is still not double expenses as the rules require. I will take jobs far enough to need a hotel while there, but drive home on my days off. It works best for me if I travel to states where the pay is significantly higher than my home state, that way I make enough to cover my home expenses but still come out ahead. This is why you have to really study the offered pay package, do the math, and make sure that it makes sense before signing the contract.
  13. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Getting the worse assignment ever shift does happen in some hospitals does happen, but not in every hospital. Shorter contracts make that easier, and I never extended in those places. Like mentioned before, sometimes you do get easier assignments because they don't fully trust travelers (until they figure out that you know what you're doing).
  14. Wow, you certainly have had quite a career! Thanks for sharing! When doing my community health project as part of my BSN, I worked closely with a nurse from the local health department and the United Way. It seemed interesting to me, but I'm not ready for a M-F 9-5 just yet. Thanks for sharing your experiences.
  15. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Sorry that you found the fake names off putting. No way I put anything that might be linked to a real patient, I meant to be funny. As PRN I still have a territory, but I'm asked "if" I will go outside of my area. The full time nurses (at my company) don't get this especially if they are below their points. The lack of choice is why I would never go salary. One of my co-workers was scheduled an extra day, without being spoken about it, because she was 3 points low for the week. Also, I still know my patients as much as any other RN who works here. We typically only see them for admit and discharge anyway. RNs do some other visits,but only on the LPNs days off.
  16. If you have ever considered working in home health, then you might want an inside glimpse at what it is really like. To help those with questions, I am going to walk you through a typical day in my life as a home health nurse. I enjoy home health for many reasons, but I find that I can’t do this job full-time. I mostly do travel nursing but when I need a break from the fast-pace and stress of the hospital, I take a PRN job in home health for a little break. So, let’s begin a walk through a typical day as a home health nurse and I will share with you what I love and hate about it. First, your shift actually begins the night prior. On Sunday night I look at my schedule for Monday. I see who I am to visit and review the file. First up is Mr. Soandso, he is a new admit and I review the information that the hospital has provided. Next, I look at Mrs. Someone, who I will be visiting to provide wound care, so I review her file to see what wound care I will be doing and make sure I will have the supplies needed. Then I take a look at Mrs. Whatshername and find that I will be administering IV Rocephin, taking note of the general time frame in which she needs to get her infusion. After that, I read Mr. Whoeverheis’s file and find that he will also be a new admit, and so I read the file from rehab to find out what happened to him that brought on a referral to home health. After reviewing all my patients for the next day, I write down a list with a notation of where they live. This allows me to have a general idea of the order in which I will plan to visit them. Then I begin to make my phone calls. On a really good day, I am able to reach them all on the first try. On the worse day, none will answer their phone and I have to wait for them to each return my call. Here we have some of the reasons that I do and do not like home health. On the one hand, I get to plan my day. I decide how early or late I will start, but it is guided by how many patients I am scheduled to see on a given day. As a PRN nurse, I can tell the company how many I want to do each day, but if I were a full-time nurse, I would have an expected minimum, which might be 7 or 8 patients. I do not like the fact that I have little control over how available my patients will be to me. Sure, they are supposed to be homebound, so one would think that I could show up anytime and they would be happy to see me, right? But humans do not behave that way. Needless to say, I will have a vision of how I would like to manage my group of patients, but some will refuse to be seen in the morning, while others will want me to show up at 8 a.m. So, while I am supposed to be in control of this, some of that control is taken away by the patient’s preference. This can be a challenge because my patients may be geographically 30 miles or more apart from each other. Another challenge that I might face as I try to plan my workday is that my new admit patients may, in fact, still be in the hospital, so I won't really get to see them and chances are good that I will not have a replacement patient to see. This is one reason that working PRN in home health might not work for someone. You are paid by the visit. So, if my patient is still hospitalized and I can’t see them tomorrow, I am losing the pay that I would have gotten if they were home by now. As a full-time nurse, this would work out because I would be on a salary and the company will make sure that I get the minimum number of patients or I would get paid my salary anyway. Moving on, let's assume that I can reach and schedule each of my patients and it is now Monday morning. I scheduled Mr. Soandso’s admit for 9 a.m. I arrive at his home on time and I ring his doorbell. I immediately hear the sound of a huge dog barking on the other side of the door. I imagine that this beast could tear my leg off and I hope that Mr. Soandso will put the dog elsewhere for our visit. Mrs. Soandso answers the door, cracking it open just enough to tell me not to let Rover out while I come in. This dog is massive and drooling, and he is sniffing me and growling, but Mrs. Soandso assures me that Rover will not bite me as she leads me to the living room to meet Mr. Soandso. I sit down, all the while the dog is still growling a bit but starting to settle down. He finally positions himself at Mr. Soandso’s feet but continues to watch me closely. I pull out the mountain of forms that I need to fill out and have the patient sign. Mr. Soandso was hospitalized for CHF exacerbation and after doing the paperwork, I open my tablet and start the computerized charting. I perform a full assessment and interview the Soandso’s to find out how much they understand about CHF and how to manage this condition. This information allows me to put together my plan of care for the patient. I begin the education process by telling them that Mr. Soandso should be doing daily weights and keeping a log. He has never done this before, but he does have a scale. I ask Mr. Soandso to weigh himself so that I can get a baseline weight. As soon as he stands up, the dog goes back into protection mode, threatening to attack if I make a wrong move. We finally get through weighing the patient, starting a weight log, and I have documented as much as I can. I have been in Mr. Soandso’s home for over an hour and I need to be going, so I review the plan of care with him, let him know that the physical therapist will be seeing him tomorrow, and I feel relieved to get out with all my body parts in place. Next up is Mrs. Someone. She lives about 20 miles away, so I put her address into my GPS and start the drive to her house. I need to make a bathroom stop, but as a home health nurse, I am fully aware of which gas stations have clean bathrooms, so I make a pit stop at the Wawa. I grab a snack to eat on the drive. Mrs. Someone lives in a large apartment complex. I drive around a bit to find her building, then I drive a bit more to find the closest available visitor parking space. I haul my tablet, clipboard and huge bag up the 3 flights of stairs to her apartment. I find Mrs. Someone to be a delightful lady. She is so sweet and funny. I am able to complete all of my documentation while at her home and I perform her wound care. She had an abscess inside the fold of her buttock just above the rectum, but she made jokes about what a “pain in the butt” this has all been. I spent about 45 minutes with Mrs. Someone and then I moved on to the next patient, Mrs. Whatshername. After driving 10 miles to the home of Mrs. Whatshername, I find that the lawn has not been mowed in what looks like a year. The path to her door is very grown up and narrow. My arachnophobia is on high alert as a squeeze through the jungle of plants hanging over her sidewalk. I get to the door and see webs in every corner and on the eves above. I take a deep breath and ring the bell. She answers the door and welcomes me into her home. As I walk in, I find that the inside of her home is no better than the outside. The living room is full to the brim. There are magazines and newspapers piled up on all the furniture. There are boxes stacked in every corner and under every table. Beside her chair is a large stack of mail that is falling over in disarray. There is a hodgepodge of stuff everywhere, leaving only a narrow path through the living room to the kitchen, which is no better. I can see dirty dishes spilling out of the sink and all over the counters. The kitchen table is covered with papers, boxes, dishes, and pill bottles. She has two coffee makers on the counter with another one on the floor below. The top of the refrigerator is loaded down with small appliances, books, and more mail. To make things worse, as I am taking in all the clutter, I glance down and see a roach walking past my foot. Oh boy! I just want to get out of here, but she must have her antibiotics, so I open my tablet and get started. After taking her vital signs, I ask her where she is keeping the Rocephin. She points to a box that is on top of a couple of other boxes. I try to hide the look of disgust on my face as I find roaches in her box of supplies. Thankfully, everything is in zip-lock bags, so protected if the bags are sealed. I quickly check the bags to make sure that there are no bugs inside. I mix the medication and begin her infusion. While we wait for the medication to infuse over 30 minutes, I talk to her about the possibility of getting help cleaning up her home. The poor dear is 82 years old, has no children to help and she can’t do it herself. I ask her permission to have a MSW visit. She is agreeable, so I put in the referral. After Mrs. Whatshername’s infusion is complete, I drive over to Mr. Whoeverheis. This time, I find myself in the driveway of what I would consider a mansion. This home is gorgeous and huge, with a perfectly manicured lawn and expensive statues lining the driveway. Mr. Whoeverheis had fallen and broken his hip. He went to rehab for a week and now needs home physical therapy. This man is very kind and very appreciative. I learn that he lives all alone in this huge house, and he is quite lonely. While I fill out the forms and do my computerized documentation, he tells me stories of being in the military and then of this life as a bodyguard to some impressive people. He also tells me about losing his wife a year ago and how much he misses her. This brings me to one of the reasons that I absolutely love home health. I love the one-on-one time that I can spend with my patients. I listen to their stories and I get to create a real relationship with them. Sometimes this means just getting to listen to them and being someone that they can talk to, other times, it is having the ability to really give them the quality teaching that they need to take care of themselves. I get a real sense of satisfaction from this. But as you can see from the examples I chose, it also means going into some really dirty and gross environments, facing ferocious dogs, and worrying about carrying home bugs in your bag. I didn’t even mention homes with 16 cats and the odor that comes with that, or the occasional confrontational family members. I also didn’t give an example of some neighborhoods that I would rather not be in but have to face. Home health has it’s good and bad sides, as you can see. I love not having a supervisor watching every move I make, but on the downside, they often call you on your day off to discuss a case. You also take a lot of work home. Continuing the scenario above, when I get home, I now have to call the doctors of the two admit patients. I need to confirm that the PCP will sign our home health plan of care and orders. Sometimes this is smooth, but other times, it takes multiple calls over a few days to reach someone. This delays turning in your documentation, and it’s frustrating. I also need to finish my documentation. In this case, I must finish the admit documentation from Mr. Soandso. This may take up to an hour after I get home. However, on some days I have multiple patients to finish documentation on. This might be because I had so many patients to see that I simply couldn’t take the time needed to do it all while in their home, or it might be because the home was so disruptive that I didn’t want to sit there and try to work with a dog barking at me constantly, or cats climbing all over me, or I didn’t want to sit in a home with a bug infestation any longer than I had to. For whatever reason, I find that I have to do a little or a lot every afternoon, which takes away from my home time. I also have to plan my next day. I can’t begin this until 5 o’clock in the evening because my schedule can change up to that time. On most days, I spend two hours reviewing charts and calling to set up appointments, further taking away from my home time. I find that the downside is worth the upside. I don’t feel stressed every minute of my day. I can stop for lunch whenever I want. I am always dealing with just one patient at a time. There are no call lights constantly going off, and I don’t have to rush to pass meds in a 2-hour window that is full of interruptions. While I’m talking to you about home health, I will give you the pros and cons of working PRN vs. full-time. As I mentioned before, PRN allows you to control the number of patients you see every day and set limits based on how much you want to do, plus choose the days you want to work. This is all good, but the income can be irregular because the full-time salaried nurse’s schedules will be filled first. They get the assurance of regular reliable income, but they do not get to choose what days they will work or how many patients they will see. The full-time home health nurse’s schedule is set up on a point system, and they are expected to perform a minimum number of points each week. If the points are not met on any given day, they will often have to do more later in the week to make up for it. I do not like this lack of control over my work day. The salaried nurse will also have on-call shifts. This might mean leaving their home multiple times a day because it is unpredictable if a patient will need an emergency visit. If you have thought about home health in the past, then I encourage you to give it a try. There are advantages and disadvantages to this job choice, just like everything else. If you can tolerate spending a lot of time in your car, animals of all kinds, and going into some very poor environments, then it might be for you. I suggest trying it on a PRN basis at first, while not giving up your regular job. This way, you can try it out. If you love it, you can always go full time. There is a lot of need in home health right now, partly because many nurses come to home health, but then can’t deal with the downsides. Insurance companies are pushing for more home health because it is cost effective and prevents rehospitalization, so there are many available jobs to be filled.
  17. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Yes and yes! My office tells them that in their welcome call, but very few comply. In this area 90% have pets. Many pits, which are ok most of the time. Of course my office has 100% success rate in making initial contact and confirming that the PCP will sign orders, but then the nurses can't contact the patient by phone, drive bys are hit and miss, some are not home yet, and some PCPs refuse to sign orders. What does that tell you? Lol
  18. I can't speak from a legal point, but when I graduated I could not get a hospital job. I was offered two home health jobs. The first was the most horrible company you can imagine! The second was great. I got lucky, one if my patients was the mom to a director in a local hospital. I asked him for advice and was told ,"You have to know someone.. but now you know me." So I suggest networking to find a job. Can you get in contact with anyone who precepted you or the manager of any unit that were on as a student? Do you know any working nurses who would recommend you to their boss? Maybe see if you can find any local nurse groups on MeetUp and join the group. Another thought... Maybe you can get your foot in the door as an EMT at a hospital, or work as an EMT so that you can get to know people in hospitals. One more suggestion.. look for hospitals out of your area who are offering large sign on bonuses. Those places need help. You might not get the bonus, but they may be more inclined to hire a new grad. Best of luck and hang in there!
  19. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    I have worked with other travel nurses who took the whole family. These two nurses had RVs, their spouse took care of the kids and they home schooled. It can be done. Those nurses made it a lifestyle. There are travel home health jobs too. When I travel my spouse comes with me, but he is an independent computer programmer, so he just needed internet to work. I would say that 1) you need to make sure the contract would pay enough to cover your expenses or 2) if your spouse is a nurse you need to negotiate opposite work days. It might be a challenge to find short term child care. Those would be the things I would think about when traveling with kids. Traveling is a great way to find a new place to live, but also keep in mind that you most likely won't be able to take a contract and then stay on permanently. There are non compete clauses in the contract. While it's not impossible, the hospital will need to pay the agency a large sum to keep you. The other options include getting a permanent job in a different hospital in the area you like, or leaving the one you like for a year then going back as an employee. I hope this helped.
  20. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Thanks!
  21. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    In regular home health it is a bit different. I mostly just do admits and discharges, except on the LPNs day off, then I will get wound care or infusion visits. Most times I don't see them enough to get to involved. There are some long term patients and repeat offenders that I get attached to.
  22. tinyRN72

    Celebrate Nurses Article Contest

    HI! I posted another article under Home Health Care
  23. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    If it happened it wasn't obvious. I mostly found that I was given every single angry, rude, confused or combative patient. Lol
  24. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Yes! These are also great perks of being a travel nurse. I have to admit that I find it insulting when a hospital has low expectations of travelers. I have only really seen this in one hospital. In this case, I was not allowed to care for s/p open heart patients.
  25. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Your welcome 819Nurse! If you have any specific questions, just let me know.
×