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tinyRN72

tinyRN72 BSN

Cardiovascular Stepdown
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Melissa Gallant has been an RN for over 6 years. She has worked in cardiovascular step-down for the majority of her career. As a travel nurse, she also has experience with med/surg, tele, ortho, float pool, and med oncology. Melissa is also the co-owner of https://etheriawellness.com/ where she offers nursing consultations, health and wellness coaching, meditation and mindfulness classes as well as other health-related classes.  

tinyRN72's Latest Activity

  1. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    I've applied with insurance companies a couple of times. I got an interview, but not the job.
  2. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    You are correct! Home health is full of this type of behavior! These are great suggestions, thank you.
  3. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    That was a great way of expressing some of the things I have feeling. I have one offer on the table now. It is not my dream position - med/surgery after years of cardiac step down? They would not train me in ER or ICU, even though I would be quick turn around to independent in either of these positions. However, I also applied for a supervisor job at a SNF/rehab. They called after I got the other offer, and I interviewed today. I am expecting an offer.... I am not sure how I will chose. AND I don't want to burn the bridge to the first place. Oh, why can't I just win the lottery... Then I could just go around volunteering to what I want when I want it! Lol
  4. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    Thanks to both of you. I know that can not works PEDs. I solute every nurse who does because you must be an angel. My heart would just break too much. I know job changes are not good. I don't think the travel part hurts, because that is the definition of the job. However, looking for a new job after only a few months isn't helping me. I have to though... Not getting enough hours. To further complicate things, I have an interview today which is only going to confuse me if offered the job... I will have a hard time choosing between the two offers. But, I'm going anyway.. so it's all on me.
  5. I have never worked in a rehab, nor have I had a management role in nursing. I was in management for years before nursing. I feel comfortable taking a supervisor role, but I really don't know what to expect. Can anyone offer insight about this type of job? The fact that it is in a nursing home leaves me uncertain about the job specifics. Thank you in advance!
  6. My career has been marked by one main constant - change! Can change really be constant? Read my story and decide for yourself. I started my career as a home health nurse. I was really happy with it for a while because I got to spend one-on-one time with my patient and I made (what I considered at the time) good money. But after about a year, I was looking for something else. Home health nursing was wearing me and my car out. I was putting about 600 miles on my car every week and I was working about 80 hours a day. My poor husband told me, "I feel like I live alone because you are either at work or working at home." And he was right! I had a huge territory, and I saw 7-10 patients a day. I was constantly being asked to pick up extra work because there were not enough RNs. This got old, and besides, I became a nurse to work in a hospital. This led me to my second job: working on a cardiac step-down unit. I loved this too! My job was 10 minutes from home, I didn't have to bring home any paperwork or documentation, and (what a privilege!) I was given health insurance and paid time off. I thought I was in heaven (again). So what happened? I was working with some really snooty nurses who didn't like new people at all, it seemed. This made me feel sort of lonely for 36 hours a week, and my pay actually went down. My husband and I had always wanted to do travel nursing, so I got signed up with an agency and off we went! That was a really fun time in life, filled with so many adventures, good pay and more choices. Travel nursing is full of change: a new hospital every 13 weeks. This was good for me. I guess I'm sort of gypsy at heart. I loved moving around all the time. I loved the change. Every new place was a new start and by the time I started being temperamental about the hospital, it was time to go and start over again. What could possibly go wrong, you ask? Well, living in an RV or a hotel most of the time started feeling cramped. I missed my (grown) kids because I was away from home so much of the time, and about this time I was also feeling really burned out in hospitals. To give myself a new change, I decided to go back to home health. Here is my current problem. Working in home health requires being available 5 days a week to make enough money. I thought it would be a good trade-off for the reduced stress compared to the stress level I was feeling hospitals. But it has been less than 6 months and already I am tired of working 12 hour days 5 days a week. I am tired of having to call doctor's offices on my days off. I am tired of working all day in the field only to come home and have to document, answer emails, call patients to set up my next day, and I'm tired of being tired. I miss having 4 days off every week. Yes, I have applied and been offered another hospital job. Will this make me happy this time? I sure do hope so. Before the comments start - I have considered other types of nursing. I have looked at and applied to many non-hospital and home health jobs. Unfortunately, I have not been able to get an interview for a single one. Additionally, I really do love 3-12s, and I have only seen that in hospitals. I realize that I am going to have to accept the fact that no job is going to be perfect. I think I've done that. I hope I've done that. If I am to be 100% honest here, I know that working for myself is the only answer that is going to make me feel satisfied in the long run... and I am working on it
  7. tinyRN72

    July 2019 Caption Contest: Win $100!

    Oh sorry,but you've hit the 1 hour limit on uninterrupted sleep!
  8. tinyRN72

    July 2019 Caption Contest: Win $100!

    Excuse me, I didn't get in report whether or not you want to be waken for pain meds.
  9. tinyRN72

    Combat Fatigue

    I agree with many of the others here... Diet and exercise, but here are some tips I haven't seen yet: 1) How much sugar do you eat? It might sound strange, but cutting sugar increases energy levels for a lot of people. 2) How are you timing your meals? Do you eat breakfast? Do you go hungry all day at work? If so, it might help to have several small snacks during your shift, especially if you work 12s. 3) Quality of food is ready important. Are you getting enough veggies, fruit and healthy protein? A little more information would be helpful. Feel free to send me a pm if you like. What labs were done exactly? Did they check your thyroid and A1C?
  10. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Well, it can be hard. Some people arrange a "roommate" situation, where they have a low rent commitment, or "live with family", pay low rent, but are never there. Honestly, some, just take the risk and make the money without having a true tax home. A good travel agency will want to document your tax home. Some do it by working just at the 50 mile marker, so that they are technically legal but can still go home every night.. but this is still not double expenses as the rules require. I will take jobs far enough to need a hotel while there, but drive home on my days off. It works best for me if I travel to states where the pay is significantly higher than my home state, that way I make enough to cover my home expenses but still come out ahead. This is why you have to really study the offered pay package, do the math, and make sure that it makes sense before signing the contract.
  11. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Getting the worse assignment ever shift does happen in some hospitals does happen, but not in every hospital. Shorter contracts make that easier, and I never extended in those places. Like mentioned before, sometimes you do get easier assignments because they don't fully trust travelers (until they figure out that you know what you're doing).
  12. Wow, you certainly have had quite a career! Thanks for sharing! When doing my community health project as part of my BSN, I worked closely with a nurse from the local health department and the United Way. It seemed interesting to me, but I'm not ready for a M-F 9-5 just yet. Thanks for sharing your experiences.
  13. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Sorry that you found the fake names off putting. No way I put anything that might be linked to a real patient, I meant to be funny. As PRN I still have a territory, but I'm asked "if" I will go outside of my area. The full time nurses (at my company) don't get this especially if they are below their points. The lack of choice is why I would never go salary. One of my co-workers was scheduled an extra day, without being spoken about it, because she was 3 points low for the week. Also, I still know my patients as much as any other RN who works here. We typically only see them for admit and discharge anyway. RNs do some other visits,but only on the LPNs days off.
  14. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Yes and yes! My office tells them that in their welcome call, but very few comply. In this area 90% have pets. Many pits, which are ok most of the time. Of course my office has 100% success rate in making initial contact and confirming that the PCP will sign orders, but then the nurses can't contact the patient by phone, drive bys are hit and miss, some are not home yet, and some PCPs refuse to sign orders. What does that tell you? Lol
  15. I can't speak from a legal point, but when I graduated I could not get a hospital job. I was offered two home health jobs. The first was the most horrible company you can imagine! The second was great. I got lucky, one if my patients was the mom to a director in a local hospital. I asked him for advice and was told ,"You have to know someone.. but now you know me." So I suggest networking to find a job. Can you get in contact with anyone who precepted you or the manager of any unit that were on as a student? Do you know any working nurses who would recommend you to their boss? Maybe see if you can find any local nurse groups on MeetUp and join the group. Another thought... Maybe you can get your foot in the door as an EMT at a hospital, or work as an EMT so that you can get to know people in hospitals. One more suggestion.. look for hospitals out of your area who are offering large sign on bonuses. Those places need help. You might not get the bonus, but they may be more inclined to hire a new grad. Best of luck and hang in there!
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