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aquaphone

aquaphone

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aquaphone's Latest Activity

  1. aquaphone

    Trouble at NYSNA?! Pension-Benefits-Staff Strike???

    Laborer, I don't know what you're trying to say. Are you trying to be funny? Are you making light of the situation and laughing with me? Are you trying to imply something else? Since this is a text based forum, not a face-to-face conversation, a lot of the intended meaning behind your message is lost. However, I think you're trying to be insulting. Am I wrong?
  2. aquaphone

    Trouble at NYSNA?! Pension-Benefits-Staff Strike???

    Here is an email I sent to NYSNA: Dear NYSNA Leadership, A highly unprofessional flyer was posted on the walls of my hospital with photographs of NYSNA executives attacking them on a personal level. This is equivalent to something an adolescent might do. It explained nothing about the actual grievance, and only served to convince me that these are not people I would want representing me. Then I received two emails from NYSNA's CEO. These were more sophisticated than the flyers posted by the USW. The first email painted a portrait of a fair and equitable management offering a wonderful contract to a bullying staff. Management seemed to have no idea why the USW would want to strike. It seemed to claim that since the contract being offered was so fantastic, the only logical reason for a strike was to get rid of the NYSNA management. However, the second email admitted that there were in fact some changes to the contract. Since neither side has helpful, I've had to get information from other sources. Most of my co-workers had no idea any of this was going on, even yesterday, the day before the strike. It just goes to show you how little involvement there is in union matters on the part of the staff. Perhaps if NYSNA management and employees spent more time organizing and less time fighting amongst themselves, my co-workers would have some idea of what is going on. The general consensus among my co-workers is that they 1) really don't care about the whole situation, 2) think you all are wasting our money 3) would like to fire all of you. (That is, they would like to fire BOTH the NYSNA employees and the NYSNA management.) You are now supposed to be negotiating a contract for us, the nurses who pay your salary. Instead you are fighting with each other. Oh, how Continuum management must be laughing at us. You have made us into a joke. Sincerely, (name withheld for privacy)
  3. aquaphone

    Trouble at NYSNA?! Pension-Benefits-Staff Strike???

    i'm a member of nysna. all the information i've received form nysna and the usw has been, in my opinion, dishonest propaganda. i did manage to find some outside information about the strike: nurses and negotiators that represent unionized nurses plan to strike at midnight friday because of changes to their work conditions. the irony, they say, is that their employer is a union that advocates for worker rights."it's surreal," said kathleen korman, a nurse representative from guilderland who is part of the united steelworkers union within the new york state nurses association. about 65 nurses, lawyers and professional staff at the association are represented by the unit. "we fight all the time against employers who make unilateral changes to working conditions," korman said. "nysna directs us to fight them and we do it, but i guess (nysna) can do it." latham-based nysna represents about 37,000 nurses and health professionals in new york. a nysna spokeswoman said the association has offered a fair and fiscally responsible contract and hopes to have a resolution soon. "we really believe that we can arrive at a mutually acceptable contract and avoid this strike entirely," said robin wood, director of communications for nysna. the union that represented the professional unit was dissolved in march 2010, but days before the union's end, leaders of the professional staff went to nysna and asked the administration to voluntarily recognize the staff's new union. nysna administration refused the request, saying several unions were trying to organize the staff, and advised them to choose a union by vote. two months later, the staff voted 64 to 1 to join the united steelworkers union. in the meantime, nysna imposed new working conditions that required the staff to carry blackberry mobile devices, changed rules for compensatory time and restricted vacation time accrual. wood said the changes brought the professional staff in line with nonunion professional employees at nysna and other professionals within the united steelworkers union. previously, the professional staff had a 35-hour work week and received compensatory time if they worked excessive hours, but nysna's new conditions removed the definition of a work week and proposed "when one has worked excessive hours with justification to the associate director and with his or her approval, an occasional (comp) day would be granted." victoria longo, co-chair of the professional staff's union, said nysna would never let nurses agree to such a contract. "the very things we are asking for are the very things we get for our members," longo said. a mediator has called for the parties to negotiate saturday. read more: http://www.timesunion.com/default/article/union-threatens-to-strike-new-york-state-nurses-1366323.php#ixzz1lzt3fqsd
  4. Consider yourself lucky. Would you really want to attend with faculty that behaves in such an unprofessional, inconsiderate manner? Better to not get involved in the first place than to invest tens of thousands of dollars and years of your time only to realize you're made a terrible mistake. Keep in mind also that if you are forced to leave a CRNA program, you can pretty much forget about ever getting into another one. Why not apply to Buffalo, Albany, or Columbia, for example? All of those are excellent schools. I was fortunate enough to be accepted by a few other CRNA programs. However, if I were not, I would NOT reapply to UMDNJ next year. They showed their true colors the day of the interview. This demonstrates the importance of applying to multiple programs. Admission to CRNA school is extremely competitive. You greatly increase your chances of success by applying to as many programs as possible. I personally applied to nine programs this year. You don't want to find yourself in a position where you're forced into program with a "toxic" environment. Good luck in the future.
  5. Well, I got a rejection yesterday, but I guess that's no big surprise!
  6. aquaphone

    Will I Stand Out?

    I think it you will help you stand out. You already have lots of experience at the bedside, so you won't be in shock, and you also have some pretty impressive education under your belt.
  7. aquaphone

    Verbal assault by a pt.

    Pedicurn, Of course your views and experiences are important, and sexism does still exist. But I ask you to consider that male nurses do face a great deal of verbal and physical abuse from patients, as well as disrespect from physicians. I have personally faced it many times, and don't you think my experience is important, just like yours? I had one family member come into his wife's room and start screaming and cursing so much that I had to lock myself in a supply room and call security. I had never even met this person. I just heard him screaming from outside the room. His tantrum was triggered by the physician's refusal to speak with him in a timely manner regarding his wife. My boss later criticized my decision to call security, although the man was out of control and disrupting the entire ICU. I had a male patient punch me in the face. I've been verbally abused by plenty of patients, both male and female. The verbally abusive females didn't seem intimated by me, male or not. I've had physicians shout and behave inappropriately towards me many times, and I've had to write them up or put them in their place plenty of times. Believe me, these are things male nurses ALSO have to put up with. This is not a MALE or FEMALE issue, it is a NURSING issue. Please, we should be working together on this. A hospital administration with a culture of blaming nurses is the problem, not gender. We nurses need to support each other and stick together. Let's not be divided on this.
  8. aquaphone

    Verbal assault by a pt.

    Pedicurn, What exactly is a 30 something "loss of control" professional female? Perhaps you can clarify that one. A "particularly snobby" couple isn't going to give a civil response to anyone, because they are, as you put it "particularly snobby." Particularly snobby people are not nice. If they were, we would call them "particularly polite". You are correct, men are not usually referred to as "the girl". No, I have not had a patient ask "Can the girl get me something to drink?" in reference to me. I have been called "young man" on several occasions. Both men and women can be verbally abused by doctors. Residents learn very quickly that female nurses are NOT weaker. Anyone who believes that female nurses are "easier to unload on" is in for a rude awakening and abrupt attitude adjustment. I've seen arrogant doctors cower after getting on the wrong side of certain female nurses. I love it. I've also seen female and male nurses verbally abuse doctors, especially residents, so it goes both ways. There have been times when I've been ashamed of my fellow nurses for the way they talk to doctors and patients. Suggesting that we don't need evidence or studies to validate behavior is dubious. There is a whole movement towards evidence based practice. Your personal observation was that you worked ONE ENTIRE twelve hour shift with a male nurse and that he didn't receive bad treatment while you did. So based on that ONE shift, you have concluded that it was because he was male and you were female? Is it possible there are some other reasons why he gets along with the doctors and patients better than you? Your personal observation and opinion is not a substitute evidence. As I said, I stand behind my female co-workers 100 percent. I proudly support the female surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurse practitioners, physician's assistants, charge nurses, nurse managers and staff RN's, and CNAs I work with every day. There are many women who I am glad to say are my role models in the workplace. Of course sexism still exists. My own mother wanted to be an attorney, but was told by her high school guidance counselor that women didn't do that. She was marching for civil rights before I was born. And now you are labeling me as sexist and offensive to females, and you say that I'm doing a disservice to women? I say workplace abuse and violence is an issue that BOTH male and female nurses frequently face and that we must remain united.
  9. aquaphone

    Verbal assault by a pt.

    As far as women being attacked more often than men, there is no way to know unless you're looking at studies. It wouldn't surprise me either. However, just because it wouldn't surprise me doesn't mean it's true. And if it is true, men and physicians being assaulted and verbally abused at work is still a serious problem. Personally I've lost count of the number of times I've been verbally abused. And as for assault, that has happened to me many times as well, so the whole generalization that these things don't happen to men is ridiculous. Most importantly, like I said, we need to come together as women and men, from all healthcare disciplines, to confront this problem. Making generalizations based about gender without evidence is not helping anything, it's just driving us apart. It's not fair, it's not nice, and it's insensitive.
  10. aquaphone

    Verbal assault by a pt.

    Korky, I find your comments about males offensive and sexist, and your comments about doctors are not much better. As a male nurse who was grabbed, pinched, groped, punched in the face and even bitten by a patient during my six years tenure as a nurse, it's clear you don't know what you're talking about. I've also seen doctors threatened and mistreated by patients, especially in the ER. We even had one doctor threatened at gunpoint at my hospital. This is a problem that all healthcare practitioners face, both male and female. Comments like yours only serve to divide us, the practitioners, against an indifferent administration. We all need to come together to fight against workplace assault and violence, not splinter apart on some imaginary fault lines created through gender or class. At least if you could produce some evidence demonstrating that female nurses are subject to more abuse than males, which of course you cannot, you might have something to go on. Can you show me one study or journal article validating your opinion? Perhaps you should refrain from making baseless sexist and derisive comments about your co-workers. I stand behind my female co-workers and fellow healthcare practitioners 100 percent.
  11. They asked more clinical questions that anything else. They were the types of questions you would expect on the CCRN exam. They also asked the standard "Why do you want to be a CRNA?" and "You have 30 seconds to tell us why we should choose you instead of those other people in that room." Yes, there were extremely rushed, they made that clear with attitude, body language, lack of eye contact, tone of voice, and and actually cutting me off as I was speaking. As for how they are able to rush and also get a good evaluation of the candidates, that is something you would have to ask the admissions committee of UMDNJ.
  12. aquaphone

    rotating shifts....is this the norm?

    I've never had a rotating shift. I've known nurses from other countries, like, for example, Israel, who said they rotated shifts. However, their schedule would be two weeks of days, two weeks of evenings, and then two weeks of nights. Your schedule sounds just CRAAAAZY!
  13. aquaphone

    Verbal assault by a pt.

    As long as the patient isn't in immediate physical danger, take a walk. I've left the room plenty of times when a patient was abusive. Sometimes you just have to do it.
  14. I didn't know until about my third year as a nurse that it was truly my calling.
  15. Dear RNpjm, I also anticipated that they might not have a chance to fully read my credentials before hand, so I brought multiple copies with me to the interview. However, when I tried to mention them while speaking I was cut off mid-sentence with "That's more than 30 seconds."
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