Jump to content
ObstreperousYoungLad

ObstreperousYoungLad

Student :-)
advertisement

Activity Wall

  • ObstreperousYoungLad last visited:
  • 11

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 673

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

  1. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Quick artifical urinary sphincter question

    So I told my grandma I could watch my grandpa today. He's got Alzheimer's and an AUS so I was just curious as to what I need to do with that. The last time I helped out my grandpa he was pretty much screaming the entire time as my grandma and I got him seated on the toilet. She reached down and it seems like she squeezed something for him to urinate but I couldn't really see what she was doing. From what I understand, an AUS helps with incontinence by keeping the urethra closed. I really don't want to be fumbling around with my senile grandpa's penis as I try to work with this new apparatus (well...new to me.) Any advice on this sort of thing would be tremendously helpful. Thanks. (On a personal note--I just finished my first semester of nursing school yesterday and I'm already back to patient care )
  2. ObstreperousYoungLad

    12 Hour Shifts--A bad idea?

    Yeah, that's an interesting thought for me because I've grown up with my parents doing just that and I've always thought of it as the norm. I've always associated 3-4 days/week with my teenage jobs in retail.
  3. ObstreperousYoungLad

    12 Hour Shifts--A bad idea?

    Ouch! Yeah, maybe I'm just a rotten, lazy, entitled millenial, but I think it's absurd to force someone to do a 12 hour shift if they're not up for it. I wonder if European hospitals have this issue as well. That article I posted said that "the likelihood of making an error increased with longer work hours and was three times higher when nurses worked shifts lasting 12.5 or more hours. In addition, working more than 40 hours per week significantly boosted the risk of error."
  4. ObstreperousYoungLad

    12 Hour Shifts--A bad idea?

    Yeah, I suppose I could do it if was only 3 or 4 days/week. Coolpeach, you have my sympathy. Hopefully as time goes on things will get better for you. I guess I better just keep hitting the gym and trying to eat right to prepare.
  5. ObstreperousYoungLad

    12 Hour Shifts--A bad idea?

    I'm currently a nursing student and things have been...interesting lately. After seeing nurses in my acute care clinicals and browsing this forum I've come to the conclusion that 90% (Yes, 90% exactly) of nurses are either feeling horrible, terrible and in some cases miserable. And I often come across articles like this: National Nursing News | The Fatigue Factor: Too Many Alarms, Too Little Downtime So I have to ask those who work/worked 12 hour shifts: How do you feel about it? What is the experience like? I'm sure a lot of it depends on what sort of unit one is on, but it seems dangerous to me for someone to work that long while caring for six or seven patients. It must take a toll on the ability to focus...
  6. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Lung sounds and breasts

    I appreciate advice, but please, don't act like you know what I'm thinking or "viewing something as". I assure you, sexual thoughts weren't on my mind when I was auscultating an 81 year old with some very serious problems who would constantly moan in pain and say to me "Daddy...please help." I'm a 22 year old guy and this is absolutely a legitimate concern--just look at the varied responses this thread has generated. What if I get an extremely religious patient or someone who's extremely uncomfortable with a male touching her breasts? It's probably going to happen and I'm trying to deal with that by posing this perfectly legitimate question to people with more experience than me. Yeah, I may still be touching a breast with a glove on but that "flimsy" bit of latex does make a difference--details do make a difference. It's like saying "Hurp durp durp it's just a flimsy gown what difference does that make if it's on!" It's the very principle of the thing... I don't know what you've been taught, but I was taught that asking these sort of questions and making these kinds of observations IS professional. Now I don't have a wopping 5 years of experience yet myself, but y'know what I think might qualify as being unprofessional? Answering a question in a condescending way and making assumptions about someone's professionalism based off of one internet post. Gee, I'll bet that's real conducive to teamwork and teaching.
  7. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Lung sounds and breasts

    EVERYONE IS SAYING DIFFERENT THINGS AM I ON CRAZY PILLS OR SOMETHING!? Okay--all better. I'm just going to go with what my instructors told and listen to all the sides with my steth on the skin. Any advice to make that go smoothly is cool. Really, I'm probably just over-thinking this stuff. It's just skin and I have a job to do. On a personal note...I don't think I'll be able sleep tonight. Ugh. Stupid anxiety.
  8. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Lung sounds and breasts

    J621d, I certainly DO plan to listen thoroughly--I'm merely getting the opinions of more experienced nurses. Also, do any of you wear gloves when doing the baseline? I don't mind touching someone's arm when I'm taking BP but touching a breast with my bare hand seems creepy.
  9. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Lung sounds and breasts

    Well the consensus seems to be to listen to the posterior side and not bother with the anterior side unless there's an abnormality or difficulty hearing. I suppose this is just one of the little ways that book-learning differs from real-life experience... Thanks everyone!
  10. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Lung sounds and breasts

    Thanks Cherry. And yes, at my college they want us to listen to the anterior, posterior and lateral sides.
  11. ObstreperousYoungLad

    Lung sounds and breasts

    Hey people, first time poster here. I'm also a first year student and tomorrow I begin acute care clinicals. This will be my second bunch of clinicals, my first being at an extended care facility with elderly patients. Overall my first experiences with clinicals was good. I had the opportunity to change briefs, give baths/showers, watch a dressing change, assess stage 2 pressure ulcers, perform baseline assessments, etc. Unfortunately there was one part of my experience that I feel I need to improve: lung sounds. I'm a drummer and my ears are pretty crappy as it is. My patient had dementia so communication was a bit tricky and I could never get her to take deep breaths. My patient was also female so naturally I felt awkward trying work around her breasts--What is the best way to listen to lung sounds in a way that makes the patient as comfortable as possible? I tried to reach down the front of her gown but then my elbow/arm is right up in her face. I was thinking perhaps I could simply untie the gown from her neck and lower it gradually as I work my way down, but then if she's got an IV that could get in the way...and my patient couldn't really straighten her arms so that would have been tricky too. Any response would greatly appreciated! (Also--I get the impression that people under 30 are thought of as somewhat burdensome...any general wisdom on how I can fight that stereotype?)
×