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scribblz

scribblz BSN, CNA, LPN

Med Surg, Tele, Geriatrics, home infusion
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scribblz has 14 years experience as a BSN, CNA, LPN and specializes in Med Surg, Tele, Geriatrics, home infusion.

scribblz's Latest Activity

  1. scribblz

    How to Deal with Staff Who Don't Like You?

    Agreed. The bigger the place the less likely to be trapped with petty people who succeed off the work of others. Also research culture, non profits are less likely to have these types of people. Positions with a lot of autonomy are also less likely to have these kinds of interactions. I do home infusion nursing per diem and in 1 year I've met 1 co-worker and my DON. It's fantastic, I take good care of my patients punch in on my phone submit my paperwork digitally and punch out of my phone and go home. not that it's 100% drama free I still have to deal with the idiosyncrasies of the pharmacy 😂 but significantly more peaceful than when I did LTC.
  2. scribblz

    How to Deal with Staff Who Don't Like You?

    "Presume good will" I like that. Thanks for sharing! To the OP: We all have a default level of expectations for others that we meet. Optimistic people tend to give people the benefit of the doubt more easily and not be as easily offended. Different periods of my life when I was younger, less secure and anxious about how I was perceived I was quick to worry that people thought I was inadequate. As I got older and more comfortable in my own skin I realized that by owning my mistakes and learning from them, I simultaneously was becoming less sensitive about them. Being defensive is a mal adaptive coping mechanism for fear of criticism. The solution is to embrace feedback. Good or bad, assess that feedback. Is it valid ie. Is there evidence to support it? If someone is being rude or bullying you can still take back the power in the dynamic by owning the situation. Ie. Yes, I did xyz incorrectly. I'm unfamiliar with it, and I'm going to learn more about it. If you really want to drive them crazy smile when you say that and walk away. Then you go your own way and learn everything there is to know about whatever it is you struggled with. People will notice this about you, and the right people will respect it.
  3. scribblz

    Nurses are Pushed to the Brink

    I think you are 100% on the money! Given this time of crisis all those nursing students who are being denied their clinical could come be SNAs instead and Gain valuable experience and be a huge help to their local healthcare facilities. People always say it's so hard to get in to hospitals as a new grad, but SNA's are almost guaranteed to get in for preceptorships and new grad RN positions. If ever there was a time for a mutually beneficial relationship to be invoked now is the time! Also there are tons of elective department such as GI RNs that are looking at using up all their unemployment time when we so desperately need our ends of any kind they could be buddied up with experienced Med surg RNs so that we can handle the ridiculously large assignments we have been given these days. At this point I don't want more money; I want more staff. I want to feel like I'm not endangering my nursing license, sanity and conscience every single day when I go to work.
  4. scribblz

    Trump tells supporter to not confront left wing rioters

    Well let's explore this...we both work in healthcare, and I hope we both agree that all people require some form of preventative/maintenance healthcare and emergency healthcare. So when I say it's a right what I mean is that it's a basic and universal need. I think our current system of multiple insurances tied to people's employment and income is impractical especially with today's unemployment numbers. But uninsured people are also a burden to the healthcare system. The emergency room ends up picking up a lot of mental health crises and poorly managed chronic illness. We can't turn people away, and society pays for the have nots one way or another. Why not make healthcare affordable and universal?
  5. scribblz

    Trump tells supporter to not confront left wing rioters

    Plenty of successful social democracies out there...look at quality of life for people in Denmark and Sweden. The whole fear mongering that we'll "end up like Cuba and Venezuela" is an overused playbook. I find it hard to believe that people honestly disagree with their fellow citizens being paid a living wage and that healthcare is a human right. The violence and pain caused by poverty should concern us all. The shrinking middle class should concern us all. The wealth consolidation should concern us all. Those with wealth and power are laughing at us all the way to the bank, sorry all the way to their off shore accounts. Because the keep the people divided and pissed off at each other playbook so that those who are making all the money and consolidating all the power can do so unimpeded... oldest most successful playbook out there. So yeah you worry about out our "socialism demise". I'm going to worry about how the courts are stacked with judges who don't value individual rights over corporations. I'm going to worry about gerrymandering and our ability to hold honest elections. I'm going to worry about the notion that facts and science are suddenly now valid or invalid based on people's feelings. I'm going to worry about the FDA and our education system being dismantled and undermined at every turn. I'm going to worry and be pissed off about what is currently happening, not what might happen in the future... because the present is quite enough of a hot mess. Super disappointed about this "made great again America" 1 out of 5 stars, would not recommend.
  6. scribblz

    What will nursing look like after COVID-19?

    I like your optimism 🙂 I certainly hope the best is yet to come!
  7. scribblz

    Racism and Covid-19: The Unmasking of Two Pandemics

    Proving discrimination is almost impossible. They don't have to explain why they didn't pick some one. In my opinion people pick applicants who they get a good feeling about, often that means they remind them of themselves. Applicants who are different from the person doing the interview may be very qualified, but they may unconsciously be biased against them. Affirmative action says off all the qualified people you have to pick a candidate you ordinarily wouldn't. And I think that should include older hires and second career hires who ordinarily might not be considered because they might have baggage or have less years to give to the company I think of it as mandatory osmosis on our country's journey to homeostasis ☺️.
  8. WOW! this hospital sounds so sketchy... can't believe DPH didn't find anything when they went in. Sounds like the judge disregarded evidence the nurse's brought based on a technicality.
  9. scribblz

    Burnout, the Literature, and Understanding

    THIS. I share your theory. The more you care, the more the healthcare system will exhaust and disillusion you. It's almost as if healthcare should not be for profit...
  10. scribblz

    New protocol - No report from ER to floor...

    On my med surg unit myself or whoever is charge will get a phone call from the Nursing supervisor that they have an admission that needs to be placed. IE. I've got a 93 yr old tele admit here with CHF exac with a foley and a lasix gtt. Now if I have no close beds to the nurse's station I might have to move some people around, and negotiate for a slight delay while I work that out. But that's between the supervisor and I, not the ED. A good nursing supervisor should have a rapport with both the ED charge RN and the in patient charge RN to facilitate getting people into beds at a pace that takes into consideration how busy each are. Not to say there aren't nights they don't try to slam us every 20 minutes...but overall it works. Once she assigns the bed they SBAR via fax which provides the scenario that brings them to the hospital, procedures and tests done in the ED, basic head to toe assessment, home med list and meds received in the ED. The ED charge nurse calls to confirm we received the SBAR and provide the ascom phone extension for the primary ED nurse for that patient. They generally roll up within 15 to 30 minutes after SBAR'ing. I find it to be a pretty good system. I can call and ask any questions if I have them, but I don't have to interrupt what I'm doing to take report which totally works for me.
  11. scribblz

    Working as a shy/socially anxious nurse

    The short answer is yes ☺️ it gets easier. You have to assess people, give meds, take their vitals etc. The guilt you feel should be channeled into considering how you can do it better. Little things like keeping the lighting dim, improving their comfort by getting something they need while you are in there are helpful. If you know they are confused/ fall risk time your assessment with toileting or incontinence care. Always cluster care when possible. If you are anxious re: new equipment, procedures etc. make sure you take the time to get familiarized whether with a co-worker, on your own, Youtube, whatever you need to do. Avoid accessive apologizing as it undermines you. If you promise something and fail to deliver a brief but sincere apology is appropriate. Overall though it's more effective to focus on their needs you can meet. IE "I hear you that you are having pain, and I will continue to relay your wishes to the MD, but they require that I start with Tylenol and a hot pack first. " They can accept that or become belligerent. As soon as they get rude just let them know that you feel that the communication is no longer benefiting anyone, and you'd be happy to come back when they're calmer. Can't go wrong with treating people like you would like to be treated. But that's a 2 way street, and not everyone is a good driver. Good luck!
  12. scribblz

    Are You Really a Nurse?

    Same 🙄 irritated me too!
  13. scribblz

    Differential Case Study: Lyme Disease or Covid-19?

    Hope you are feeling better soon@SafetyNurse1968 ! Thanks for posting the case study, thought it was a good conversation.
  14. That sounds horrific. Is your unit manager out of touch with your reality that they allowed this to happen?
  15. Completely agree, if the cross training was done as you describe it. Honestly I would love the opportunity to learn new skills and areas without having to commit to them. I worry that many hospitals would not be willing to invest the time (money) up front to create this "cross trained team". Too focused on how they are hemorrhaging money from cancelled elective procedures.
  16. We were having a civil discourse before it got off track. It is out of line to attack each other individually. The internet allows us to be anonymously cruel in a way that we would (hopefully) be ashamed to be in real life. Life's too short to engage with those who trigger our worst selves.