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sunny d

sunny d

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sunny d's Latest Activity

  1. sunny d

    The Type of Nurse I Don't Want to Become

    For one thing, I apologize, it wasn't really the OP that many of the posts were directed at that gave me an uncomfortable feeling; there were a handful of somewhat nasty posts directed at the OP, but more directed at each other. What I'm trying to say is, the way something is said is very important, not only what is being said. It just looks like a lot of people here are kinda nasty to each other, some to the OP, and by "here", I mean not just this thread, but on lots of threads in this forum. Just to be clear, there are plenty of threads in this forum that are not filled with mean and nasty back and forth stuff, but it seems so strange to come across this kind of behavior in this forum in general. And yes, I know, a lot of venting goes on here, but really folks, lot of people have tought, stressful lives, and it is amazing to see the amount of rude behavior that pops up here! Other professionals I know are not as a group so petty and nasty. OK, I don't mean all nurses, but a there are a lot of postings here that are petty and nasty.
  2. sunny d

    The Type of Nurse I Don't Want to Become

    I thought teaching was a part of being a nurse; if so, what do many of the nurses responding here think they are teaching the OP? I happen to agree with a few of the things the OP said and disagree with other things, but that's not what I want to discuss now. It looks like there are a lot of responses that really come down pretty hard on the OP for specualting about aspects of nursing that she hasn't experienced yet as a working nurse. I agree that (depending on the topic) the perspective of a working professional can be more valid in certain ways than that of a student. However, it looks like many of the responses have just ripped the OP to shreds - what is that going to teach her about your perspectives? Maybe that "nurses really do eat their young"? To those nurses who've slammed the OP, is this the way you deal with other "young" in your lives, like your teenager, or other people young in either their lives or in whatever path they are on at the time?
  3. sunny d

    For all of those on Medicaid

    To JoPACURN: Yes. And I see you don't let them get to you either - good. And you're better at getting right to the point than I am.
  4. sunny d

    For all of those on Medicaid

    OK, to those who won't ask "where the heck am I coming from", well just from a lot of experience dealing with people. I've actually gotten more optimisitic about people the longer I deal with people, especially the ones with problems. And yes, I've been in jobs with lots of stress, very rude people, and various life and death situations on the job, so these kinds of situations are not that unique to nursing. And no, I've never done drugs. I'm not unique, but maybe you just don't see that much of this kind of attitude on this forum, which seems to have a lot of people venting a lot. I also see a good amount of positive attitudes here, but it seems like there is more posts that are just venting. Relax, you can have any attitude you want, I was just posting my opinions.
  5. sunny d

    For all of those on Medicaid

    It's been very interesting to read all these threads, and it has made me do a lot of thinking. I honestly don't personally have a problem with people doing things like going to an ER for a pregnancy test when they could've bought a test for a buck...I don't think this kind of thing is about the money, but that girl may have had a lot of other thoughts about that pregnancy, thoughts that she couldn't even express, but were upsetting to her, and she may have felt somehow drawn to the ER because she needed and thought she might get some kind of kindness, and that wouldn't have been available just by plunking down a buck for pregnancy test. Of course in terms of money going to the ER for a pregnancy test doesn't make sense, and of course money is needed for other, more acute medical problems. However, my feeling is that a political issue, not a medical one, and I don't feel it is appropriate to make political judgements about a patient while working as a nurse. I'm also trying to say that I respect working nurses for having their own, and possibly different opinions. It occurred to me that maybe it is easier for working nurses to feel compassion for patients who have visible medical problems, and maybe that is because nurses are trained more specifically to address those problems. Maybe it comes down to what kinds of problems are you most familiar with, which then would give you the most understanding of those kinds of problems. I grew up in poverty, and was surrounded by people who made poor choices, and/or had varying degrees of mental illness, or character flaws (which is what I think of as spiritual illness). Many of these people also had big entitlement issues. When I see people with these issues, I feel sorry for them. I feel like I understand a lot why people have these kinds of issues, and that makes it easier for me to feel for them. Just because I think I understand where a lot of people with these issues are coming from doesn't mean that I want to enable them. It also doesn't mean that I would stop providing medical care to another patient who had a more acute medical problem to the person with entitlement issues a glass of water. I would do triage as best I could, and provide care to the patient who needed it the most first. I also generally don't get angry or lose my patience when I'm asked for trivial things and am in the middle of something more urgent. To my thinking, when an entitlement patient does things like demand a glass of water when a nurse is busy with a more medically acute problem, the fact that the patient couldn't understand this shows just how insensitive the entitlement patient is, and I see insensitivity as a real sickness of the soul. We all are insensitive at times, and usually don't even realize it, but we all have reasons for acting however we do at any given time. In a way, that entitlement patient isn't in his right mind at that time, and I don't take personally things that may be directed at me from some who isn't thinking clearly. I wouldn't lose patience in this kind of situation just as I don't usually lose patience when I'm training a puppy not to pee on the floor, or teaching a child that temper tantrums won't get them what they want. I see these situations as all dealing with someone who is unable for whatever reason to react appropriately, and I see unwillingness as a form of inability. I will try to remember that we all come from different backgrounds, and nurses who have different opinions on all this are reflecting what they've learned as a product of whatever background and education they've had. And just because somebody has the ability to operate some technological gadget doesn't mean they have what it takes to become truly educated, whether formally or informally. People need to believe they wouldn't fail in order to even try to obtain a formal education, and informal education takes a lot of self awareness that isn't always easy to face. After seeing so many nurses responding in ways that make it clear how frustrated they are with rude patients, I am sorry to see these nurses taking all that so personally. You seem very compassionate about your work, and I can see you are probably over-burdened at work, and it is hard to show your best sides all the time under those circumstances.
  6. sunny d

    For all of those on Medicaid

    People who are on Medicaid and are considered to abuse the system by asking for extra crutches because "Medicaid will pay for it" may say that because it is easier to say that than to say that maybe she's afraid she can't get back if she something happens and she needs more crutches. Maybe in this case this person is suffering from too much anxiety - so, they too are deserving of compassion and understanding, because too much anxiety is a type of sickness. And the mom who takes her son to the ER and demands he get a physical for camp the next day, or the woman who goes to the ER and demand a pregnancy test that they feel they need right away for whatever...I believe these people are also making poor choices, and although they be abrasive and come off as feeling entitled, their lack of judgement or selfishness is a type of sickness I believe that is due to character issues, what I would consider more of a spiritual sickness. If people come to a medical facility of any kind and ask for help, no matter how abrasive they may in asking for it, on some level they need help, and so they need compassion and understanding and their needs met. It seems like it is not the needs of the nurses that are to be met in the role as nurse, but the patient. I'm still just a nursing student, so while I have dealt with plenty of abrasive people here and there in life and on the job (previous career), I do respect the working nurses who may have a different perspective than mine.
  7. sunny d

    For all of those on Medicaid

    This is not to the OP, but to the people who don't seem to understand why people on Medicaid seem to be the ones that complain the most. I think I understand a little bit why people on Medicaid may be like this, and this is a generalization, so take it for what it's worth. It's my understanding that people on Medicaid may be in that situation because due to their finances that may be the only insurance that is available to them, but I also know that in certain States people who have children with disabilities may have Medicaid for those children, regardless of the parent's incomes. Whether a patient is on Medicaid because of dire personal finances or because they are a child with a disability, neither of these conditions are what people would consider enviable. For the sake of argument, let's just deal with those individuals who have arrived at a point in their lives where they are on Medicaid because of their own poor choices in life, in that these choices have left them in dire financial straits. I believe people generally do the best they can in life, period. One person's best attempt at making good choices may be quite different from another person's best attempt; the former may end up penniless and a drug addict, and the latter may end up a nurse, maybe even a happily employed nurse. I'm choosing a drug addict just to exaggerate a point, I'm not at all saying that those are representative of people on Medicaid. Is the dead broke drug addict any less deserving of being treated with compassion than the (happily employed) nurse with a car to drive to work and a house to live in? OK, what about those people who are not so far out of the mainstream (that anyone can easily observe), who are on Medicaid and do a lot of complaining? Yeah, it may be easy to put them down, but chances are they too are doing the best they can in life, and maybe they just are not at the best time in their life. So, how to feel about the complaining now? In case anyone hasn't noticed, people who are in pain tend to complain, whether or not it is self inflicted pain. These people may not even realize that they are complaining, and may even deny that they are in pain, but it isn't easy at all in many ways to be poor, even in the USA, and even when it looks like there aren't visible signs of poverty. It is possible to appear to be financially OK even when a person is living out of a car, and some living out of their car may need to try even hard to appear middle class just so their soul doesn't give up entirely. So assuming this is true, why would people on Medicaid complain MORE than people with other insurance? It's NOT because they feel so much more entitled, it is because they may feel that they haven't gotten a fair shake in life (which may or may not be true, and it doesn't matter which), or that maybe they've learned that "the squeaky wheel gets the grease", or maybe they've been put down a lot by people who don't like the fact that they are on Medicaid so the person on Medicaid feels shamed, and defensive, and feels the need to fight back, etc. OK, obviously I've gone off on a rant, so since it seems acceptable here to say almost anything under the guise of a vent, that's what I'm doing. It really annoys me that it seems so many people have so little compassion or understanding about people who are either not well educated, or middle class financially, or able to help themselves in other ways...I guess that would put the very people who lack compassion into the un-educated and unable to help themselves classes, so I'll work on growing more compassion for all of you who fit into those categories. I'm not saying I'm a saint, but really, why is it so hard for some people to understand that people who feel disenfranchised may act out a bit?
  8. sunny d

    Young and jaded.

    I'm just a nursing student, so I know that means I haven't yet been exposed to the type of constant interactions with patients who choose lifestyles that just exacerbate their problems. I can imagine how easy it must be to get burned out by trying to help someone if you expect that they will learn from their mistakes. However, I don't think many people learn easily or quickly or maybe ever from the kind of mistakes that cause them to have health problems. The people who are so overweight that they develop type 2 diabetes, the drug addicts, the women who stay with men who physically abuse them, it doesn't surprise me that these people are repeat offenders. I also don't think these people should be considered stupid just because of their behavior, even though their behavior is stupid in that it causes them to harm themselves. People who have lifestyles that adversly affects their health are probably most of the people in the United States, at least, and it is just a matter of degree as to how much that lifestyle hurts that person's health. The real sickness as I see it is not the lifestyle, which I interpret as a symptom, but the reasons for that particular lifestyle. People who overeat, abuse drugs, or any of those other issues, are suffering, and as humans who are suffering, they are deserving of respect and a caring attitude. I'm not saying that the OP doesn't care, I'm just saying that I think it is possible to care and still not get burned out, but it seems to me that would have to involve believing that many people are not capable of changing their bad habits very easily. I think people can change, but it isn't easy, and lifestyle issues in particular may be the hardest habits to change. The psychological reasons why people have lifestyles that hurt them need to be considered as much as the more obvious physical wounds. I believe everyone is doing the best that they can to survive and be happy, and that isn't always easy for many people, so they self-medicate with food or drugs or alcohol, and hope society won't bash them in some more as they try to get their act together and function in the world. To the OP, I know you posted here to vent, and so I also believe that if you didn't care you wouldn't be feeling burnt out. I think you probably know that these people are suffering psychologicaly as well as physically. I hope you can come to find a way to nurse these people without feeling so bad yourself, and maybe that means working in a different area. I wonder how much the problems you mentioned with hospital administration and doctors are affecting your overall attitude; it must be very difficult to do your already difficult job if you don't feel valued or respected. For what it's worth, I respect you for doing the kind of job you describe, and I'm sure most patients respect you for that too, whether or not they are capable of showing it when you see them. I hope you things work out for you.
  9. I'm so sorry you are experiencing all this at work! I'm not a nurse yet (still a nursing student) but I can understand where you are coming from because I've experienced a lot of what you've described at times in my previous career. I was very hurt by all that, just like you are now. I still get hurt by this kind of behavior, but way less than before. I agree with many of the other responses you've got that it would help to get some advice or therapy on how to handle this because what can that hurt? I have gotten much better at handling difficult people and that is mainly because I now realize that often (not always) it is the other person who is having the problem, and the problem is not with me. For example, when I experience an instructor who can't teach her way out of a paper bag and is condescending and treats most of her students like they are not smart enough to be a nurse, I realize that this instructor may have some kind of an inferiority complex. She needs to feel better or smarter than other people and she puts others down to feel better about herself. Then I don't take her bad attitude personally. I wouldn't be surprised if your brains and good looks are intimidating to other nurses, but instead of playing them down maybe you could just try to look as pretty as you feel like because your patients would probably appreciate it anyway. Then when a co-worker gets snarky with you about something unimportant you can just smile and ignore her snarkiness, that could really drive her crazy and maybe she'll leave you alone. I think you have gotten well thought out and experienced advice from the others here, but I just wanted to add my support so you know that people care about you. You can overcome this, look how much you have overcome in your life!
  10. sunny d

    is Nursing School HARDER than Medical School?

    Thank you to all who responded to my post. I guess I should've clarified that the only reason I asked if NS was harder than Medical School is not because I thought they were both "oranges" or both "apples" (I understand they are very different in their approach), but because Medical School was the first thing that came to mind when I was thinking about what other kinds of schooling are considered very hard. My point is, I do believe NS is hard, and that it takes tons of effort and time, JUST LIKE Medical School - BUT, to constantly hear that NS is SO VERY HARD implies that the person these remarks are being said to either doesn't know that NS is hard, or isn't capable of succeeding at NS. It seems that many Nursing Instructors spend a lot of energy on their first year students trying to convince them how hard NS is, and that seems strange. Is this just being said to intimidate? I mean, the students are clearly experiencing the difficulty of NS already, so is this some kind of mind game to weed out only those who are "brave" enough to dare to try to succeed in NS?!? I also don't understand why so many people seem to assume that the only kind of schooling that was obtained previous to NS required memorization without understanding or "critical thinking". Plenty of people that I know with college degress and advanced degrees in a variety of subjects were required in their schooling and on the job to use "critical thinking", to look at the whole picture, think quickly, and choose the best of several possible right approaches. I don't want to offend anyone. I just don't understand the motivation behind some the things that are said about NS.
  11. Whether is it from a Nursing Instructor or classmate, I keep hearing that Nursing School is HARD, HARD, HARD!!! This is no big surprise to me that is hard, but it seems strange that this is emphasized so much; it seems like people are trying to scare people away from Nursing, or maybe there are other reasons. I've never heard people emphasize this aspect of Medical School to the extent that I hear it about Nursing School. I think medical students know they are doing something hard, and I never hear anyone emphasizing again and again how hard medical school is. Why is Nursing School treated like the most difficult thing to do on the planet? OK, sure it is hard, but to keep emphasizing this makes it almost sound like the person saying it maybe didn't get any respect for how hard they worked, so they want everyone else to be impressed with how smart they are to have made it through. I just never hear Doctors going around saying how hard Medical School was, and I think it because everyone knows it is a hard thing to do. It sounds like Nurses have an inferiority complex. What gives?
  12. sunny d

    Is Critical Thinking TAUGHT or just ASSESSED?

    thanks to all who posted and provided such great insight and book recommendations! I guess I now see why critical thinking is so important and difficult in nursing school because it is one thing to pick the correct one of four multiple choice answers (hard enough) but then to apply critical thinking in real life nursing is another story.
  13. sunny d

    Is Critical Thinking TAUGHT or just ASSESSED?

    thanks Mi Vida Loca, now I understand, good examples!
  14. sunny d

    Is Critical Thinking TAUGHT or just ASSESSED?

    thanks, studentinnursing for the black and white example of how Not to critically think ! Your answer made me realize that I've been dealing with multiple choice questions that require critical thinking, so I have at least an idea of how to approach this! thanks again
  15. sunny d

    Is Critical Thinking TAUGHT or just ASSESSED?

    Thank you mi via loca, I agree with itsmejuli, your explanation of critical thinking is very clear. And itsmejuli, I agree with you that there should possibly be some sort of logic class as a pre-requisite for nursing school. Everyone says that the hardest part of nursing school is the critical thinking part, so I don't understand why this is isn't taught...it makes me think that maybe those who define the nursing school curricula may feel that a. critical thinking can't be taught, and b. that those who can't think critically shouldn't become nurses, and just let them do poorly or flunk out. If critical thinking can be taught, it seems like it should be taught and required as a pre-requisite (maybe using case studies?). If crictical thinking can't be taught, it seems like there must be some way to assess whether or not a person already has this skill before admitting them into nursing school. If anyone knows of some online course to develop critical thinking for nurses, I'd love to know about it - or even if there are good books out there for this, that would be maybe even better. thanks again to all who posted!
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