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wetzoo

wetzoo

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  1. wetzoo

    quintiles

    If you can get in at Quintiles, I'd recommend just starting there. Fantastic upward mobility (supposedly within 2 years, you can move to a clinical research associate position), and the training you'd get there is invaluable. Honestly, a lot of people (not all) who work ina hospital research position just end up coming to work at Quintiles, PRA International, etc only to work that entry level assistant position so why not just start off at the organazation if you have the chance to do so in the first place? just my 2 cents.
  2. wetzoo

    Question from a nursing student

    Honestly: use your common sense, don't congregate in small or large groups to talk, let it be known that you are very eager to learn and are willing to do any task no matter how mundane, and accept the fact that you'll run into all types of nurses throughout your career as a student/working nurse. Some will be very nice nurses and others will be not-so-nice nurses. Learn all you can from the nice ones, and take the latter with a grain of salt.
  3. wetzoo

    Non-nursing jobs

    Clinical research organizations like PRA International, Quintiles, Parexel, Convance, etc may hire new grads as entry level clinical research associates, but those positions are rare/few and far between and vary depending on your background in addition to your nursing degree. More than likely new grads start off as research/clinical trial assistants and move up to clinical research associate. The progression is rather quick, I've heard. Honestly, with a nursing + pharmacy tech background, you would be a great candiate for this. Healthcare IT organizations like Cerner, and Mckesson also hire new grads as entry level delivery consultants.
  4. wetzoo

    Are jobs becoming more available

    Care to share some of these tactics? I'm sure these unemployed new graduates would love to know where these readily available jobs are and how to get them.
  5. Clinical research organizations like PRA International, Quintiles, Parexel, Convance, etc may hire new grads as entry level clinical research associates, but those positions are rare/few and far between and vary depending on your background in addition to your nursing degree. More than likely new grads start off as research/clinical trial assistants and move up to clinical research associate. Healthcare IT organizations like Cerner, and Mckesson also hire new grads as entry level delivery consultants.
  6. wetzoo

    Nurses eat their young - now I understand why.

    I'm positive that it's not only young nurses that make bad interview mistakes....? If you find these new grads so challenging to interview, or in your words- "arrogant" and "privileged" , change the listing to "experience required". Simple solution.
  7. wetzoo

    KCMO Hospitals, St Lukes

    I'm a new grad and I'm actually interviewing for a position at St. Lukes this week. It took about 3 days after applying to get the call. I don't remember seeing any openings for NICU or L&D, but I do know that Liberty Hospital hires new grads and I do remember seeing an obstetrics opening. I know that you said that you wanted to stay on the MO side, but KU also has a Clinical nurse entry opening in the NICU last time I checked (last week).
  8. wetzoo

    If you hate being a CNA will you hate being an RN too?

    And why do you think that being a nurse would change any of that?
  9. wetzoo

    Failed NCLEX 5 Times! Am I The Only One Who . . .

    I don't understand what you mean by this. In order to get to those higher level questions, you must first pass basic level questions. If you kept getting basic level questions wrong, then you would ultimately fail. Getting a higher level question wrong, takes you back to a basic level question, and vice versa.
  10. wetzoo

    Is my short career over?

    I completely understand where you are coming from as I was in a similar situation very recently (had a horrible experience in LTC). I don't think that you should give up. I think that you should look for and apply to every nurse residency program within desired distance (if your heart is in direct patient care). There are, indeed, opportunities for nurses in insurance. You can be a case manager, depending on how tech-savvy you are, you could be a consultant for companies like Cerner and McKesson. I usually just go to job search engines like indeed.com and simply type in the word, "healthcare" and am provided with tons of "RN required" jobs that do not include direct patient care. Hope this helps, and good luck to you.
  11. wetzoo

    Need advice on leaving current job

    Do your best not to burn any more bridges. I know that some people might be of the opinion that they would have been angry no matter what how you gave your resignation but you just really never know. You might need them as a recommendation one day, you might want to come back, or you might need/want some PRN extra work w/them once in a while. Give your resignation in person.
  12. wetzoo

    Ever wonder...

    As I already posted, a general lack of communication was her problem. As well as her dismissive demeanor. And again, had she simply said, the pharmacy was working on it, there wouldn't have been a problem. Otherwise, one thinks that the patient is simply being forgotten about. "Dinged for leaving in a hurry"? Really? Last time I checked, it wasn't common practice to leave the room in the middle of conversation.
  13. wetzoo

    Salary to expect as a new grad nurse

    I can speak from very recent experience that finding employment as a new grad is, indeed, tough. For me, getting interviews wasn't the hard part. The hard part was beating out the other 5-7 people also interviewing for the position. My sincere well wishes to all the new grads still looking. Just got hired on in a Rehab center in MO. Will be making $26/hr for day shift.
  14. wetzoo

    Anyone familiar with MU's Accelerated BSN Program?

    PROS: The program is extremely diverse. My class had so many different personalities and I loved getting to interact with them. Reputation. Having the Sinclair School of Nursing on your resume helps. Great clinical instructors. Great clinical sites. I'm sure I'm missing more, but if you get the chance to attend, I'd say to definitely do so without hesitation. CONS: Honestly the only con I can think of how intense the program can be. The longest break you will get is 3-4 weeks of Christmas vacation, and believe me when I say to savor every moment of it. I was taking pre-reqs up until last May and started the program 2 weeks later. Like any accelerated program, it can be very draining emotionally, and physically. I wish you luck on your interview! It's a fabulous program with a great reputation.
  15. Simply put- use it as fuel, and prove her wrong. It's amazing the things you can accomplish in the face of adversity. I have a previous degree, and was told this in gentler words in my first semester ever in college. I never forgot what she said. By the time I graduated, I was at the top of my class, all the other instructors loved me, and I had essentially made a name for myself in the program for various accomplishments. I kid you not, on the last day of attending college there, I ran into the same teacher and she told me how proud she was of me, and gave me a hug. It was like something out of a movie, but it was most appreciated.
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