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Chellyse

Chellyse

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  1. Chellyse

    Are you afraid to approach minority staff members? WHY?

    Ok here goes: 1. Professionally speaking (no pun intended) It bothers me when any group of individuals begins speaking in a different rhetoric in front of patients families and co-workers which is excluding in nature and intentionally (ex. Filipino, Haitian,african american slang,creole) I think you should be aware of people around you and how it makes them feel. 2. It bothers me when excuses are made for anyones behavior when discrimination is the undertone (ie. She was brought up in the South, or White people owe the black people, He or she is gay/ lesbian) You need to be responsible regardless!!! 3. I bothers me when management does not want to address an an issue because it "might become racial", or an african american claims "they are doing it because I am black" (I am not saying that there are no cases when this is a truth I am expressing I have seen this issue exploited too) 4. Professionals that claim I do not understand something because of the language culture barrier but are using it as an excuse to get out of a particular work related scenario, I have seen this happen too frequently. 5. It bothers me when someone of my race approaches me and uses derogatory slurs under there breath about someone else, and I call them out for it. It is like they assume I am going to automatically agree because I am of the same race. I hope I am expressing myself correctly, it is difficult to write about these things easier for me to express verbally. 6. I do not like disparity of treatment for any reason, racially, sexually, mentally ill, poor, rich.....And people do this!! Just my honest ramblings Michele
  2. Chellyse

    Are you afraid to approach minority staff members? WHY?

    You can find it here: https://allnurses.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=24165 Note: Merged threads together. Karen
  3. Chellyse

    Who will listen then?

    I went to Nursing Polls section and read the minority thread you posted and think it is a great topic of discussion. It probably got moved because the board moderators felt it was a good nursing poll or meant to be placed in that format. Here it is: https://allnurses.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=24165 Thanks for starting the discussion thread and poll. Michele
  4. Chellyse

    Who will listen then?

    I do not agree that it is human nature for one to take care of it's on first, atleast not in Healthcare. I think that would constitute a learned behavior (imho). I also believe it maybe a modeled behavior.Then in time becomes quasi acceptable behavior if not addressed. I have worked in Long Term Care and have witnessed this type of treatment on occassion, both with disparity of treatment and racial slurs from elderly whites to the minority caretakers, but that is not an excuse! I have been called every name in the book by sick, feeble, mentally ill and demented residents during caretaking but I have not changed the level of care given to those patients. I have changed my approach. Education is lacking, reverse discrimination is prevelant, any discrimination is unacceptable. I think tracking the the neglect and approaching the supervisor would be an avenue to start. I think leaving would be the wrong answer. The issue of derogatory language against you by the CNA is workplace harassment . No easy answers here, but there should be no excuses either. Michele
  5. Chellyse

    Use graduate students who fail State Boards?

    deespoohbear I found this site when I was out surfing earlier: http://www.nurspeak.com/tools/articles/nclex_myths.htm NCLEX® Myths & Facts Change to white background (MSIE) With excerpts from: http://www.ncsbn.org/public/testing/info_fact.htm Myth: Candidates are randomly selected to receive maximum length examinations-265 items for the NCLEX® -RN examination and 205 items for the NCLEX® -PN examination. Fact: It is not true that candidates are randomly selected to receive a designated number of examination questions. As a candidate takes the examination, questions are selected based on the candidate's response to previous questions. Testing stops when a candidate's performance is estimated as being either above or below the passing standard (passing level), regardless of the number of questions taken or the amount of testing time elapsed (five hour maximum time period). Myth: If you had to answer more than the minimum number of questions, then you failed the test. Fact: Most people who fail had to answer greater than the minimum number of questions, but plenty of people pass with a variety of number of questions asked. There's no absolute way to tell based on answering more than the minimum number of questions. The only possibly realistic conclusions students seem to draw from their testing experience is that if the test stops at the minimum number of questions (85 for PN, 75 for RN), then they probably passed--or bombed miserably. Myth: Candidates who receive the minimum number of items (75 items for the NCLEX® -RN examination, 85 items for the NCLEX® -PN examination) and the last item is "easy" will fail the examination. Fact: It is often impossible for candidates taking the examination to know which questions are difficult and which questions are easy. However, the level of difficulty of a question is not related to the content area of the test plan-and the content of the last question is not an indication of a candidate's competence level. The examination is constructed to recognize that each candidate will have strengths and weaknesses in particular subject areas. All examinations, regardless of length, have the required proportion of questions from each area of the NCLEX® -RN or NCLEX® -PN Test Plan. Myth: Passing percentages are really high. Fact: There's no "passing percentage" that you can discern--everyone gets about 50% right and 50% wrong. Myth: The passing standard was raised for the NCLEX® -RN examination in 1999, and is the cause of increased candidate failure rates for the examination. Fact: No change to the NCLEX® -RN examination passing standard was made in 1999. The current NCLEX® -RN examination passing standard went into effect on April 1, 1998. The passing standard is reviewed every three years. In October, 2000, the RN passing standard was reviewed and it was decided that no changes would be made. In November 2001, the same decision was made concerning the PN exam. Myth: Other states (like California & New York) require a higher passing standard for licensure. Fact: All states accept National Council's recommended passing standard for the NCLEX® -RN examination or NCLEX® -PN examination to be eligible for nursing licensure. California and New York do not require a different passing standard on the NCLEX® -RN or the NCLEX® -PN examinations for initial nurse licensure by examination. Myth: You can't study for the NCLEX® Fact: Phooey! If you're weak in certain areas, you can and should study those using one of many NCLEX® preparation books available. The NLN exam that most students have to take in the last semester of nursing school is a good indication of where you stand. People who fail the NCELX usually failed this exam, too, although NLN failure is not a guarantee of NCLEX® failure. If you use the results to bone up on subjects, you will probably do OK on the NCLEX® . Myth: The NCLEX® examination will contain fill-in-the blank questions beginning April 1, 2001. Fact: The National Council plans to begin pilot testing innovative item types such as fill-in-the blank questions in the fall of 2000 with boards of nursing. Depending on the results of this pilot study, some of the innovative item formats may be used to develop NCLEX® examination items. However, administration of these innovative item types on the NCLEX® examination will not begin April 1, 2001. The National Council will provide updates on this pilot project on its Web site. This means you won't be getting an exam with fill-in-the-blank questions. Myth: NCLEX® examination questions that include graphics (pictures) are not "real" questions and do not count in the pass/fail result. Fact: They count! All questions presented on NCLEX® examinations are important. The inclusion of questions that contain graphics is not new. Questions that include graphics were likewise included on NCLEX® paper-and-pencil examinations. On the NCLEX® -RN examination, the minimum number of questions is 75, which includes 60 "real" questions and 15 "tryouts," which are not counted toward your competence level. The maximum number of questions possible in the NCLEX® -RN is 265, which includes 250 "real" and 15 "tryout" questions. On the NCLEX® -PN examination, the minimum number of questions is 85, which includes 60 "real" questions and 25 "tryouts," which are not counted toward your competence level. The maximum number of questions possible in the NCLEX® -PN examination is 205, which includes 180 "real" and 25 "tryout" questions. There is no way to tell which questions are "tryouts." All NCLEX® examination candidates are given a brief tutorial and three sample questions to practice use of the examination interface (space bar and enter key). The word sample is printed across each sample question on the screen. Once the word sample disappears, the candidate is in the actual test. There is no break in the administration of questions between the three sample questions and the actual examination questions. Myth: Beginning in April 2001 with the use of the mouse, the NCLEX® examination will begin using essay-type questions. Fact: The National Council will not be using essay-type questions in April 2001. How using a mouse would enable testers to complete essay-type questions is another mystery invented in the myth-factory, and likely a computer illiterate factory at that. Myth: Some of the NCLEX® examination test questions require the candidate to select an answer outside the scope of practice for a registered nurse or licensed practical/vocational nurse. Fact: All NCLEX® examination items have been reviewed by the National Council's Examination Committee. All items have been deemed by the committee to be within the scope of practice for a registered nurse or a licensed practical/vocational nurse. When the subject is seemingly out of the testers scope of practice, such as blood administration questions for PN testers, the question usually deals with recognizing changes in a patient's condition or some other issue that the PN should have knowledge of. Myth: Most NCLEX® examination questions are written at the cognitive levels of knowledge and comprehension. Fact: For the past few years, item writers for the National Council have developed NCLEX® examination questions written at the cognitive levels of application and analysis (Bloom et. al, 1956). These questions require a candidate to utilize problem-solving skills in order to select the correct answer. Examples of these items include making assignments for four clients, prioritizing care for four clients and analyzing complex client data to determine an appropriate nursing action. Michele :)
  6. Chellyse

    Use graduate students who fail State Boards?

    BTW Thanks Joanne, I just know debates can get heated sometimes , and did not want anyone to think that was the purpose of the question... I can not help but think of how terrible it must feel to fail NCLEX after so much work. Michele
  7. Chellyse

    Use graduate students who fail State Boards?

    I agree we can't lower the standards, I read that the National Council of State Boards of Nursing ( http://www.ncsbn.org/) reviews and changes if necessary the testing process every three years, by a board of Nursing Judges. I wonder if the failure rate is going up? Here is what I found out for Florida: ( If you fail the exam, you will have to reapply by submitting a new completed application, with a retake fee of $95.00. You will also have to reapply for the examination to The Chauncey Group and pay a non-refundable fee of $120. You must wait a minimum of 91 days between each examination. After three failures of the same level of examination (RN, LPN) the applicant must successfully complete a Florida Board of Nursing approved remedial training program. The program must include classroom and clinical components and proof of completion must be submitted at the time of application for the fourth attempt. ) My mind is whirling now thinking about all the hard work it takes to become a nurse and remain in the profession.... Clinical experience should be mandatory, I can say for me it has been the best way to learn...definitely hands on here.Which leads me back to NCLEX, pencil and paper when I took it! Michele
  8. Chellyse

    Use graduate students who fail State Boards?

    Well I also found this when researching completely different angle: http://caring4you.net/letter.htm Mission Statement: This form letter was constructed to answer the growing need of the Graduate Nurses and Foreign Trained Nurses that come to this site and wonder what they can do and to whom can they turn when they have failed the NCLEX? I believe that it may be very possible that the administrators of the NCLEX may be capitalizing on the critical nursing shortage that we find ourselves facing today in these United States. At the very least, it is worth an investigation to be sure that this is not so. Please use the form letter below and forward it to anyone you see fit. Pass the word and let others know that this form letter is here for their use as well. We can not have the government work for us as Nurses if they do not hear our voices. Let us all rise up and TAKE ACTION TODAY! God bless America! Use the links above to find the address of the person you wish to write. Cut and paste this form letter into a word document. PLEASE be sure all spelling and paragraph spacings are correct. You will not be taken seriously if it is not done correctly. When writing an important letter, it is a general rule NOT TO EMAIL. ALWAYS write a letter and sign your name at the bottom above your typed name. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To:___________________ [name of title of representative] [Address of person to whom you are sending this letter] From:_________________ [your name and title] [Address and phone number where you may be reached] [Place date here] Dear [address as sir or madam]: As you are aware, as of July 23, 2001, the Nursing Shortage Response Act of 2001 was introduced in the House of Representatives [H. R. 2594] as was the Need Act [H.R.3020] which was also introduced to the Senate [s.721]. I am writing you today on behalf of the Nursing Profession. As you know there is a shortage of Nurses in the United States today and the problem will only grow to be worse in the years to come. With the number of new nurses getting state licenses barely rising-and demand for nurses soaring because of an aging population and the popularity of home health care-the Labor Department projects a shortage of 450,000 nurses in just seven years. The NCLEX is the exam that all nurses must pass to be able to practice in the United States. The persons that are responsible for this exam are the Board of Nursing in each State where the potential nurse wants to get his/her license to practice and the Chauncey Group International, Ltd 664 Rosedale Road Princeton, NJ 08540-2218 phone: 609 720 6500 fax: 609 720 6550. In order for a future nurse to take the exam, they must pay a fee to the Board of Nursing in the State in which they wish practice and a fee to the Chauncey Group. If an individual does not pass, they pay the entire fee again. This individual keeps paying the entire fee until they pass. At present, the fee to take the exam is in the range of $220 - $250 between paying the Board of Nursing and the Chauncey Group. Today, I am writing you with growing concern that the failure rate for the NCLEX keeps rising. Granted the NCLEX administrators will say that they raised the passing standards and it is logical that one will have more failures. Yes, while this fact may be true, I wonder as to the intentions of the Chauncey Group and the Board of Nursing. Are their intentions to raise the standards of the NCLEX passing rate at a time of such a critical nursing shortage meeting a need or taking advantage of a situation? We have no choice as Graduate Nurses or Foreign Trained Nurses but to take this exam and they understand this. To pay a complete fee each time to retake the exam, many future Nurses run out of funds or get so discouraged, they give up. Now, the education they received in college to be a Nurse means nothing. The diploma earned is no more than a piece of paper and they are stuck paying back the student loans. This fact definitely contributes to the nursing shortage. Naturally, with the United States government trying to recruit Nurses into the field, this would be an opportunity for the Chauncey Group and the Board of Nursing to capitalize on such a situation and I believe it is one that is worth an investigation. Thank you so much for your time concerning this matter. I am sure I will hear from you as soon as possible concerning this matter. Sincerely: [Your name and title] COMMENTS???
  9. Chellyse

    Use graduate students who fail State Boards?

    I found this interesting article doing the research for Graduate student NCLEX failure: excerpt "Prior to 1988, the passing rate for first time test takers was 91%. In 1989, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing established a higher passing standard. The passing rate for first-time candidates then dropped to 84%. There has been a significant drop in passing rates for NCLEX- RN's since 1994." read here: http://www.newfoundations.com/CurrProjects/Mackey.html
  10. I posted a thread on Nursing Politics asking for views on the "new" Excelsior fast track program offered in Mich. here: https://allnurses.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=23607 After reading views it made me think about a thread started here a long time ago regarding Graduate Nurses who failed the State Boards...Anyway just curious How many times can you take the Boards? is it selective to each state or nationally?How many failures can you have? Now I am not suggesting lowering the standards of the Nursing Boards at all ,let me get that straight out of the box, but if we need more nurses is there a way to utilize this populace? I know in many states they can work as PCT's, I am referring to say... taking mandated additional courses then rechallenging. Please don't blast me for raising the question, I would appreciate honest feedback. Thanks, Michele:confused:
  11. Chellyse

    improve sleep in nursing homes

    I came across this article and thought I would post and get comments. I work the night shift and am constantly aware of the noise and keeping it down.Sometimes it is difficult with the level of staffing we have in LTC to complete all treatments assessments ect, on the dayshift, so nights become responsible, inevitably we have to wake up residents to complete these tasks. Of course this article does not address this factor. I believe research into the area of improving sleep is important, but this seems unrealistic to expect the industry to shell out monies for sound proof equipment when some claim to have too little funds to provide basic care. And where does the money for research come from? Could it be better spent? Ergonomic med carts perhaps? Just my opinion. http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2002-10/giot-rdw100102.php Public release date: 1-Oct-2002 [ Print This Article | Close This Window ] Contact: Jane Sanders jane.sanders@edi.gatech.edu 404-894-2214 Georgia Institute of Technology Research News Researchers devise ways to reduce noise, improve sleep in nursing homes Even modest increases in noise above the background level disturb the sleep of seniors in nursing homes, an ongoing study shows. Now, researchers will test the effectiveness of several noise-reducing environmental interventions they developed to reduce sleep disturbances among nursing home residents. Their ultimate goal is to improve residents' health and quality of life. Noise increases measured at six or more decibels were a factor in 18 percent of almost 4,000 nighttime awakenings, according to researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University and the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center. Researchers collected the data from 92 metro Atlanta nursing home residents studied for about 500 person-nights. The National Institute of Aging is funding the five-year study. "The nursing home population has a great deal of sleep disturbance," said Bettye Rose Connell, a health research scientist at the Atlanta V.A. Medical Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Emory. ".... Not all awakenings are related to noise. But sleep disruption related to noise is enough of a problem that we want to find ways to relieve it." Researchers have determined that nursing home noises usually fall into one of three broad categories: people talking; mechanical noises, such as cleaning equipment; and people doing things, such as pushing carts. So acoustical engineers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have created several low-cost, noise-reducing environmental interventions and tested them in five nursing homes. The results are promising, researchers said. One of the interventions - sound-absorbing panels hung on hallway walls - has reduced noise by a factor of 16. That is equivalent to the difference in noise between music booming from 16 speakers versus just one speaker. "These interventions reduce echoes and reverberations in hallways and rooms," said Krishan Ahuja, a Regents researcher at GTRI and a professor of aerospace engineering at Georgia Tech. "We have the noise-absorbing panels, ways to reduce the noise of banging doors, special hooks for curtains, and we even wrap the ice machines with a sound-deadening blanket to reduce noise." Researchers are also reducing television noise by moving the speakers from the TV set to the headboards of nursing home beds, eliminating the need for residents to turn up the volume too high. And they are experimenting with tiny speakers embedded in bed pillows. "These environmental interventions are appealing because they create no additional burden on the staff, which is already stretched thin because of the nursing shortage," Connell says. Nursing home residents and staff participating in the study report positive effects from the interventions. At Ross Memorial Healthcare Center in Kennesaw, Ga., assistant administrator Jimmy Ross noted "a tremendous reduction" in noise after researchers temporarily installed sound-absorbing panels on his facility's hallways. "You don't even hear yourself walking down the hall," he said. Nursing home resident Alice Cook, added: "It's much quieter here, especially in the evening.... There really has been quite a bit of difference. When I'm watching TV in the evening, it's definitely quieter. I don't hear all the interference from the hall." Having studied the extent to which noise level is associated with wakes in nursing home residents, researchers are eager to determine how much the noise-reducing strategies can reduce awakenings among residents, Ahuja said. "In the next phase, we will apply these interventions in facilities for a longer period of time and actually compare the noise at bedside with data from volunteer residents who are wearing equipment to detect whether they are sleeping and how many times they wake up during the night," explained Robert Funk, a GTRI research engineer, who is leading the field study. Researchers are studying sleep using wrist actigraphy, in which residents wear a device that looks like a large sports watch. The device records the normal arm movements a person makes when he or she awakes. To gather noise data, researchers use standard sound level meters. After researchers quantify the effects of environmental interventions on nursing home residents' sleep, they plan to study the combination of these environmental interventions with behavioral interventions being investigated in a parallel study led by physician Joseph Ouslander, a professor of medicine and nursing and director of the Emory Center for Health in Aging. Ouslander's study is testing the effects of such things as increased daytime activity, light exposure and consistent bedtime routine. "The implications of our data so far are that it will probably take a combination of behavioral and environmental interventions to improve sleep in nursing home residents," Ouslander said. Ross is hopeful the studies will provide some practical insight for nursing homes. "We're looking forward to the data from the study so we can make better decisions about dealing with noise," he said. For nursing homes, which operate under tight budgets, the cost of the interventions will have to be weighed against the benefits, Ross added. The cost of implementing noise-reducing interventions is unknown for now. But Ahuja estimates the cost of sound-absorbing panels at $1.50 to $2 per square foot. Implementing the researchers' noise-reducing interventions is problematic for now, though. "Some of the interventions are not commercially available yet, but they are made from commercially available materials," Funk explained. Bringing the materials together to create a product available on the market may take some time. The researchers' immediate focus is on creating design rules for retrofitting existing nursing homes and designing new ones to mitigate noise. ### For more information, you may contact: 1. Krishan Ahuja, Georgia Tech Research Institute, 770-528-7054 or krishan.ahuja@gtri.gatech.edu 2. Bettye Rose Connell, Atlanta V.A. Medical Center, 404-321-6111, ext. 6798 or brconnell@aol.com Georgia Tech Research News and Research Horizons magazine, along with high-resolution JPEG images, can be found on the Web at http://www.gtresearchnews.gatech.edu -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- [ Print This Article | Close This Window ]
  12. Chellyse

    Fast-track nursing plan questioned

    After reading the article describing Tommy Thompson's proposals I came across this article and wanted feedback, what do you think of the fast track approach? http://www.detnews.com/2002/careers/0210/04/b01-604114.htm Fast-track nursing plan questioned Development Center offers tutorials, but not degrees By Sarah A. Webster / The Detroit News Comment on this story Send this story to a friend Get Home Delivery SOUTHFIELD -- There's a new fast track to becoming a nurse in Michigan, but it costs between $15,000 and $20,000, depending on educational experience, and some officials question how the program is run. Medical Career Development Centers Inc., which recently opened an office near Evergreen in Southfield, is capitalizing on the need for nurses and the desire of some students to get a nursing degree. There are more than 2,000 vacant nursing jobs in the Metro Detroit area and about 125,000 nationwide, hospital associations report. The problem is contributing to decreased quality of care and higher labor costs. A new nurse makes about $40,000 here, and signing bonuses up to $10,000 are not uncommon because of competition. Despite a new Michigan scholarship program to boost nursing school enrollment, state hospital officials have complained there aren't enough slots available within colleges and universities here for potential students. So the Development Centers aims to graduate more nurses quickly. The Development Centers do not grant a nursing degree, said Karen Grobson, executive director of the Southfield location. Rather, the new company offers an intense tutorial program that helps students earn an associate nursing degree through the Albany, N.Y.-based Excelsior College, a distance learning degree program, at an accelerated pace of about one year. Students can then take the state board exam to become a registered nurse. While she acknowledges the program is not cheap, Grobson, who has been a nurse for 24 years, said the evening and weekend classes are convenient and the pace is accelerated. "There are a lot of nursing students on wait lists," Grobson said. "They can be out in the work force within a year." Bill Stewart, a spokesman for Excelsior, said the college has no formal affiliation with the Development Centers or similar companies. He said that earning an associate degree in nursing through the college costs about $6,000 overall and usually takes about three years. Excelsior is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. Grobson said she hoped Excelsior might someday partner with tutorial services, but as it stands, Development Centers helps students enroll in Excelsior and then complete the course quickly. Denise Jacob, a spokeswoman for the Michigan Nurses Association, said Excelsior is respected but that she had concerns about the Development Centers program. "It suggests becoming an RN is an easy thing to do, and that's not at all true. It's misleading," she said. Carol J. Bickford, a spokeswoman for the American Nurses Association, also was not familiar with the Development Centers program but said Excelsior is well-regarded. "The course work can be very tough," she said. Indeed, that's why the Development Centers was started in the first place, said Chris Bouwens, director of program development. He said the tutorial service, which is provided by master degree-level nurses, helps provide students with the support they need to succeed. Stewart of Excelsior said the three-year completion rate for the nursing program is about 52.7 percent and their students pass RN licensing exams at the same rate as other students. He also said that Excelsior provides all the necessary educational support to its students. Development Centers, which has enrolled eight students in its current tutorial class, predicts the need for their program will only grow. Development Centers was founded in February and also has a location in Sparta, outside of Grand Rapids, and Utah. By 2020, the federal government projects nationwide RN shortages of between 300,000 and 650,000. "We see the potential for growth as enormous," Bouwens said. You can reach Sarah A. Webster at (313)222-1463 or swebster@detnews.com.
  13. Chellyse

    an update and i need some education please

    The same symptoms from my experience. I just read a good article on PE's from Medscape you can find it here: Pulmonary Embolism - New Paradigms in Diagnosis and Therapy Andrew E. Ajani, MBBS, FRACP Disclosures Introduction The challenge of thromboembolic disease is exemplified by pulmonary embolism (PE), a potentially devastating condition that requires prompt recognition and treatment. While individual susceptibility to clot formation remains poorly characterized, significant advances have been made in understanding epidemiology and genetic risk factors. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/412972 Michele
  14. Chellyse

    Assingment under protest

    Here are two places to find out a little bit of information, on assignment despite of objection. http://www.ana.org/readroom/position/workplac/wkassign.htm http://www.florenceproject.org/ado.shtml On a personal note, I brought one to work intending on utilizing it when the staffing numbers were so low they were causing immediate danger to the residents (I work in LTC and Subacute) and when the topic was presented the retaliation factor became a priority for me. I have since left the position, wishing I would have used the tool. I have heard of a few nurses using the form in the hospital setting with better results, they took the assignment but atleast it was noted thier concerns and a paper trail was established. Michele
  15. Chellyse

    options in Jacksonville

    Sorry for the post I meant to reply to Florida Nurses and hit the wrong button....:)
  16. Chellyse

    options in Jacksonville

    I am a registered nurse in Jacksonville,Florida. I work for a company that has pretty good options for LPN's, the prn pool right now is 26.00/hr you must obligate three days per week and be willing to float between two units. The regular rate is between 16.50 and 20.00 depending on experience, for full time with benefits. If you need more info feel free to email me at Chellyse@aol.com Michele