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vicarious

vicarious

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  1. vicarious

    Keeping Glucometers Clean

    If you do a finger stick correctly, if the patient never comes into direct contact with the glucometer itself, and if you aren't placing the glucometer on the patient's bed or sheets, I see no reason to clean the glucometer after every patient use. The last thing I am thinking about is how clean a glucometer (esp. one my patient is never going to touch) is. I'm more worried about my hands and the things I have with/on me, like my scrubs. The people that think the glucometers on the typical med/surg unit are getting cleaned after every patient live in a fantasy land. I'm starting to wonder if maybe they think we just haphazardly prick fingers and wipe the blood all over the machines until it spits a number out at us.
  2. vicarious

    Keeping Glucometers Clean

    It has been my experience that the policy is to clean the glucometer between every patient use. In reality, I have never, ever seen this done. Just curious--how many of us sanitize our pens/ penlights/ watches between every patient? I cannot rationalize that, nor can I rationalize sanitizing a glucometer between EVERY patient use. I understand if the glucometer is dirty. I understand q24h. Further, I understand sanitizing stethoscopes--they come into contact with the pt. but I don't understand why nobody makes a big deal about why we do NOT sanitize blood pressure cuffs between every use. Think about it. What makes any of these things different? But I digress. I don't see a point in sanitizing glucometers unless they come into direct contact with the patient (which they do not). I don't wash my scrubs between patients.. Can somebody enlighten me on why it is recommended that the glucometers are sanitized between every patient use? Are there any randomized control trials not sponsored by the Clorox Wipe corporation :lol2:to show that there are any effects??
  3. vicarious

    Prescriptive Authority

    In Ohio, there has been some confusion on whether or not a CRNA can prescribe medications for patients..awhile ago I remember reading that in the nurse practice act, there was no mention of a CRNA being able to prescribe any medications, even intraoperatively, even if the prescribing CRNA was the administering CRNA. I believe that has since been clarified, and I believe it goes on further to say that the CRNA may prescribe pre, intra, and post operatively for a patient so long as he or she is the one administering the medication. However, there appears to be a bill (forgive me, I am not familiar with legislative terms) that proposes the CRNAs be allowed to prescribe medications for patients in the pre, intra, and post operative setting and allow for RNs, RTs, and other health care team members to administer per their practice acts. I'm not sure how this bill has been received. If anybody has any input I'd be glad to hear it http://osana.org/osana-highlights/senator-morano-introduces-sb200
  4. vicarious

    RN's, what would you like to see from Student Nurses?

    Also, don't talk about your patients. It is so tempting when you are with your clinical group to start talking about your patient and all the things you did for him. But what if the woman taking the elevator with you, even if she is hospital staff, just happens to be his sister? Of course you weren't gossiping about him, but that information really is confidential. Even if you aren't saying his name, how would you feel if you got onto an elevator full of giddy students hearing about how you did this and that and then when you get to your brother's room you find that he was the subject of discussion in the elevator? Another tip-do NOT write down your patient's last name down, and if you are going to print something out, make ABSOLUTELY sure you are cutting his name off. There was a story about a nursing student at my school who lost a full report sheet--name, dx, and everything--on campus from a patient she had. A good samaritan, figuring it was property of a nursing student, found it and turned it into the nursing office. Yeah, I would be lying if I said that I knew what the ending to this story is, but I could just see this happening to me--bottom line, cut the names off and use initials if necessary. Lastly, maybe others will agree with me on this one, but you will find that most of the "cooool" things that you learn in skills labs or whatever (e.g. injections, blood draws, IVs, NG insertions, Foleys, fingersticks, etc.) are really NOT that big of a deal once you get to the meat of your program. I remember being so excited to give a SQ shot or an accucheck at first. Ha. Fine tune your assessment skills. Keep your old assessments for fun (SANS patient identifiers, of course) and look back every year at how much you have grown.
  5. vicarious

    RN's, what would you like to see from Student Nurses?

    Remember that you will get out of the experience what you put into it. DON'T be a know-it-all (nobody likes a know-it-all, especially one who isn't licensed) DO ask questions (when appropriate) and 2 good rules of thumb: 1. treat the patient as you would treat your mother/grandmother/loved one 2. if you aren't sure, ASK. (e.g., Don't just act like you know how to pull a Foley because you want to do it. I appreciate your eagerness, but the patient won't.) and some more advice.. you are no doubt going to encounter RNs who are not a good example. it will be EASY to emulate their practices. challenge yourself to be the best. sure the right way is sometimes the hard way. but remember, it is the right way. take pride in your work and the care that you are providing--even as a student. I have found nursing to be both a rewarding and at the same time a frustrating field..on a related note, nursing can be stressful, please forgive any bad attitudes you may encounter as a student nurse. Just grin and bear it, and thank God you don't work there :lghmky:
  6. vicarious

    Traffic in Pittsburgh?

  7. vicarious

    Traffic in Pittsburgh?

    I am just wondering if anybody has any information on the typical traffic conditions in and around Pittsburgh, PA, specifically when driving to Allegheny General from 279N to make the 7AM shift. It sounds like it is going to be a bear of a drive for me. Of course nobody I know has to be at work before 8:30 and has no idea. But traffic? And then parking in that far-away garage and taking a shuttle? (I loathe shuttles--I feel as though they hate me too.) Just wondering if anybody here has any experience with AGH and the Pittsburgh traffic. HR makes it sound like it is not a big deal, whereas I am thinking, hmm sure hope I make it to the kronos on time! Also, what about when there are games at Heinz/PNC and you are working night shift? Is there any solution? I appreciate it!