Jump to content
sonicleese

sonicleese

Member Member
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 37

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 1,545

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

sonicleese's Latest Activity

  1. sonicleese

    Prepping for School Nurse Job Search

    Good Evening All, Could any of you share how you landed your specific positions in schools? I am currently contemplating starting a job search in school nursing and am looking for tips. Did you just use job sites? Scope out the schools and district openings? Go in person? I have approx 12 years experience as a pediatric nurse (all settings ranging from pediatric telephone triage, to ER to teen and adolescent specialty medicine) and am ready to leave the hospital setting. Would love any insight you'd like to share about your experience and advice! Thanks for everything you do! Lisa
  2. sonicleese

    Hospital Peds Nurse to School Nursing?

    I have 10.5 years pediatric experience ranging from ambulatory, ER, Urgent Care, Child-maltreatment, and neurology (mainly epilepsy). I am interested in trying school nursing but am wondering what the balance is between actual nursing care and documentation and paperwork. I got a heavy dose of medical writing, phone calls, paperwork, forms, etc while in a pediatric epilepsy clinic. I've recently done some sub nurse shifts at an elementary school and loved it. But I know that the role goes way beyond just tending the the steady stream of various ailments (I smell like poop, lost a tooth, bloody nose, falls, fights, headaches, stomach aches, headaches, asthma, "I feel tired" and scheduled medications). Would anyone be willing to share the pros and cons? Do the pros outweigh the cons? Any specific tips you could share or things to watch for? Happy Nurses Week Everyone, Lisa
  3. sonicleese

    Pediatrics To Adult Care

    Hello Friends, I've been a pediatric nurse for almost 11 years. My background in pediatrics includes emergency, child maltreatment, perioperative, forensic, and neuro nursing. And a bit of adult hospice. I'd like to explore breaking into the adult nursing world and am particularly interested in ER or PACU. I've applied for several positions, but I'm wondering if the adult hospitals will even consider me, given I only have pediatric experience? I'm just wanting to get some insight on any perceptions of pediatric nurses I may be up against?? Thanks in advance for any insight : )
  4. sonicleese

    Blocked by agency for work

    Do you have an update on this issue?
  5. sonicleese

    Newly hired New to hospice

    Hi ElimayRN, I was just hired as a new RN Case manager. I live in Kansas City, but the company where I was hired is in Kansas.... Have things gotten better for you? Are you still in Hospice?
  6. sonicleese

    Young hospice/palliative nurse?

    Go for it. All you have to be is the amazing young woman that you are with an open heart and desire to follow your calling. I was just hired in a hospice setting and the age range varies. Don't be intimidated by the age differences you've seen. It may be different somewhere else, and the previous poster was right that sometimes, a young heart is just what the room needs. I'm 41, so, older than you, but I have always admired and respected the younger nurses for being so much wiser and more compassionate than I was in my 20's! Trust your heart and do what's right for you. You can do it! Don't be discouraged if it doesn't happen right away.... I've been trying to break into Hospice for a few years and it was finally the right time. Peace!!
  7. sonicleese

    PTO in hospice

    I am brand new to my hospice position as RN case manager. Prior to accepting this position, I'd worked in pediatrics for the same hospital for 10 years and was accruing the most PTO I'd ever accrued: approximately 24 days a year. As a new RN for this non profit, I get sick days (different than personal time), 11 PTO days, 11 paid holidays, 2 floater days and paid snow days if the weather is bad. I am so happy I've made the change. I left a job I loved to pursue this calling that has been on my heart for a few years now. All places are different, but if you feel you'd love it, keep at it and find the right place where you're treated professionally and valued. Everyone I talk to says that Hospice takes a special kind of nurse and having the right, open heart is the first step... Good luck!
  8. sonicleese

    New Hospice nurse, all tips welcome!

    I'm glad you posted this question. I just started my new hospice position as an RN case manager. Do any of you experienced hospice nurses have tips on case management? I am brand new to both after having been in the clinic and bedside of pediatric nursing. My new position is will have me caring at the bedside and "case managing". Thank you in advance and hope the original poster is doing well! Could you give an update??
  9. sonicleese

    incivility and the workplace

    I just thought of one other thing... If your hospital has a nurse residency program or follow up program for graduate nurses, try and get connected with them. They could be a support for you when you are struggling with interactions..... Again, good luck
  10. sonicleese

    incivility and the workplace

    Congratulations on your position in the ER. It is a fantastic way to learn about yourself and humanity! ER nurses are amazing.... So, I agree with the previous poster that there's a difference between curt/concise communication when time and lives are at stake and being disrespectful and uncivil. The ANA has tightened up their standards on incivility in the work place and it is your right to expect to be emotionally safe and respected by your colleagues. Research has revealed that incivility affects turn-over and nurse morale which, in turn affects patient care. I'd document each episode and if needed, go to HR with your concerns. Try to be civil yourself and reflect on how you may also need to change your communication style. Have grace, humility, and respect for your more seasoned nurses. I know that this day and age, everyone is on an equal playing field, but a little respect goes a long way... Finally, listen to your body through all of this. Nursing is TOUGH and rewarding, but your health should not suffer long term. Nerves are normal, but if you find yourself not sleeping, have changed your eating habits, your mood has changed and you are more with drawn or sensitive, you might need to consider a move......... I've been through painful situations with colleagues. One person in particular ultimately was fired for her bullying behavior and our team is better off without her. Not all managers or hospitals will tell you to just bite the bullet, but it does take a bit of documentation and counseling to get the offender removed if necessary. GOOD LUCK!!!!!!
  11. sonicleese

    Workplace Harassment forced me to resign

    Workplace incivility is unacceptable and no one should suffer it. Every employee has the right to work in an environment where they are respected as an individual and not subjected to behavior that goes against the ANA and the nurse practice acts of many states. Research has shown that workplace incivility has contributed to poor patient outcomes, staff turnover and registered nurses leaving the field all together. Nurses "eating their young" (or just eating each other for that matter) is an antiquated and ignorant paradigm. I would take great care to reflect on your own experiences before acting on behalf of your friend. But, as you have expressed, you want to be someone who uplifts and supports. I see that as you wanting to help your friend... Just make sure you are taking care of yourself too. Take care of yourself and seek solace in wise, experienced nurses who you respect and look up to. Were you offered an exit interview? If not, you can contact your former employer's HR department and ask that you be given one so that your experiences can be documented. You resigned. You were not fired. So there shouldn't be a disciplinary record related to your exit that would affect prospective employment. Even that said, most states prohibit employers from saying much other than confirming start and leave dates of your employment. Ask hard interview questions of your next employer like "Is there a workplace incivility policy", "how are nurses protected from incivility", "What education is available to promote civility among nurses and squelch unprofessional behavior", etc. Be careful not to sound bitter, but these are questions you have the right to ask. And any employer worth your time will have good policies in place. Carry these experiences with you into the rest of your nursing career. Once you have done a bit of grieving, examine how this can empower you and not keep you from being the great nurse that I'm sure you are. I've experienced some workplace bullying in the past and, while it was so painful at that moment, the eventually helped form me into a more compassionate, stronger, woman and nurse. The root of nasty behavior usually comes from some place deep inside an individual that you can not control or predict. Normal well adjusted people do not tear others down. So, if you experience more of that in the future, try and take heart that they are probably unhealthy and their issues with interaction do not define YOU or change who you are. Good luck, and know you are not alone. Workplace Violence
  12. sonicleese

    Manager catch phrases

    Funny, for "is there anything I can help you with" depends on the setting. As a resource nurse in the ER, you find yourself asking that... and meaning it. Although many times you don't ask, you just do! In the smaller, clinic setting, it comes off as potentially more passive aggressive. Ugh.
  13. sonicleese

    Where are all of the holistic nurses?

    Thank you for such an encouraging and kind reply! Can you tell me more about how you became an authority in your particular field? In my field (pediatric epilepsy) there is high level of skepticism for families wishing to try complementary modalities (diet, oils, music, etc)..... And it seems it would be hard to even broach them without solid research. We do prescribe two diets that in some cases are curative. But that's about it. I am really excited to embrace this innate and largely untapped spring of nursing : )
  14. sonicleese

    Manager catch phrases

    "Let's talk off line about that" "I'll reach out to...." "Please be patient as we level-load" Ugh. A funny thing that happens in my setting is my manager's incorrect use of English language jargon or phrases. English is not her first language so she uses a lot of flowery/awkward queen's english and uses euphemisms incorrectly. For example, recently, when giving advice to not take on any extra tasks that may not be in our expertise, she said "don't quite your day jobs". HAHA!!
  15. sonicleese

    More Autonomy?? No more hourly wage grovelling!!

    Indeed!! I'm just curious about roles that are a bit more flexible. I used "a bit" and "less micromanaged", mind you. I didn't say I wanted to be paid to do nothing. I have been with my hospital for 10 years and for the most part, have appreciated the leaders I have had. And despite working all kinds of imagineable and hard shifts (night, swing, day, mid, and 8-5's) The work and experience that has come out if those weird hours is immeasurable. That said, as I edge into my 40's I'm wondering about new ways of doing things and don't think it's unreasonable for good nurses to have some flexibility as they get further into their career. What Thanks!!
  16. sonicleese

    More Autonomy?? No more hourly wage grovelling!!

    Indeed!! I'm just curious about roles that are a bit more flexible. I used "a bit" and "less micromanaged", mind you. I didn't say I wanted to be paid to do nothing. I have been with my hospital for 10 years and for the most part, have appreciated the leaders I have had. And despite working all kinds of imagineable and hard shifts (night, swing, day, mid, and 8-5's) The work and experience that has come out if those weird hours is immeasurable. That said, as I edge into my 40's I'm wondering about new ways of doing things and don't think it's unreasonable for good nurses to have some flexibility as they get further into their career. What Thanks!!
×