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Phoenix94

Phoenix94

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Phoenix94's Latest Activity

  1. Phoenix94

    Tips To Stay Awake While Studying

    Just like most of the good colleagues here, I do a reward system for myself. For example, for my finals, I studied for about 2 hours and got to have a 30 minute break to do an activity (ex. walk around the block, make myself some tea and watch funny videos, read or draw). If I got too tired, I would go straight to bed. Staying up ends up hurting me more than helping by the time I'm close to the end. If I wanted to go to sleep faster, I drink coffee a few minutes before bed. (I wouldn't recommend this bit to everyone since this doesn't work often for sleeping purposes.)
  2. Phoenix94

    How can I be a better nursing professor?

    Hello! Current nursing student here. In addition to the advice previously mentioned by our colleagues, there comes a delicate balance of letting students learn independently and how much information to give. From experience, I appreciated the teachers who can cut to the chase and give the information needed at the moment instead of giving a lecture meant for 3 weeks to cram into 1 day and expect us to read about 20 chapters on our own before the next week. I might sound stand-offish or selfish here, but considering this happened in the first week rather than in the middle of the semester, not throw nursing students into panic mode at the first chance given would help ease anxiety and improve performance overall. Professors tend to be very passionate of their work, and rightfully so, but there's only so much to remember between the lessons and experiences shared from the professor's field. Although the advanced information can be useful later on, for students just barely getting into the swing of the field, it can be overwhelming. Do share your experiences, but don't make it the lecture when it's not necessary. Also, please let students ask their questions. Taking the time to answer questions will show the students that their curiosity and inquiries matter. The fact that you asked this question here already tells me that you're going to be a great professor. Best of luck and we wish you the best for your teaching endeavors!
  3. Phoenix94

    Increase in School applications?

    To my knowledge, the amount of applications have increased. Not by a lot, though.
  4. Phoenix94

    Please Help! RN to BSN or RN to MSN?

    If you want to go the cost effective route, go RN-to-MSN if you can. You'll save a lot of money and you usually get a BSN along the way. Researching for 100% online schools will be a good place to start. Haven't heard of any, personally but to be fair, I wanted a hybrid school. I'm sure, given our current times, that those online schools are popping up much more than before. However, to give yourself more time to reflect on what master's degree you want, go for the RN-to-BSN. Good luck!
  5. Phoenix94

    Struggling! LPN School

    Although I'm not in an LPN program, I can relate to where you're coming from. I'm in an RN program, but also don't have any medical background/experience/work and often forget my anatomy and physiology. In addition to the suggestions already given, I would give Dr. Mike and Dr. Matt a try. (https://www.Youtube.com/results?search_query=Dr+mike+and+Dr+matt) They helped me refresh on my anatomy and physiology with enough details to make things click. I would also suggest Crash Course for a quick refresher while also making the material entertaining. (I watch these to help me get back into studying when I'm not as motivated.) Osmosis is another channel I use to get a quick overview of certain medical conditions. Not sure if you're meant to learn them but just in case (https://www.Youtube.com/channel/UCNI0qOojpkhsUtaQ4_2NUhQ) Getting familiar with prefixes and suffixes also come in handy when you're not familiar with a word. (ex. prefix dys = pain, suffix -itis = inflammation, and so forth.) Although it can be challenging to study off of a medical terminology book at the moment, getting familiar with common prefixes and suffixes you come across will help a lot. If your school offers free tutoring, look around there for extra help or asking some of your classmates if you are comfortable doing so. The keys here are to focus on yourself and use the tools that are going to best serve YOU at the stage you're in. Keep your head up, take it one section at a time and you'll start to see the hard work pay off! Before closing, a good buddy of mine is a single dad who has a business degree, took physiology about 2 years prior to the program and is currently attending an RN program. He is doing quite well in his class and has picked up tips that the top students try to learn from him. He has shown me and other students that we don't always need a full health background to do well. Let your determination and resilience push you through! You got this! I'm rooting for you~
  6. Phoenix94

    Clinicals Advice

    Okay! That's good to know. Thank you!
  7. Phoenix94

    Clinicals Advice

    First, thank you for your wisdom! I didn't know we could go inside rooms with call lights on. This is super helpful! As someone who has never been in the medical field, I practice making beds, checking vitals on a routine and keeping patients comfortable as much as I can. It becomes second nature once I do it enough times. Your 5th tip is awesome! I'll definitely make a note of that! You're absolutely right on the last one. My colleague told me that having an extra patient to help is an extra opportunity to learn. Thank you again and many blessings and good health to you!
  8. Phoenix94

    Clinicals Advice

    Thank you for the tips! For my school, we can touch medications this semester (we couldn't do it last semester) so I will keep these in mind. I noticed that mixing certain medications can be tricky since some can't be crushed and mixed with either a puree or a liquid. For tip #2, my report is due at the end of the day, but I make notes of what I want to ask and what I can research in my books and online when I get home. The third has been my bread and butter, but I have a challenge of writing all the information without getting too bogged down by the details. I should be able to administer medications this semester (last semester we weren't allowed to do so), and I'll keep your words in mind. I'm very lucky to not have encountered a mean nurse, but I'll read your article to be bettered prepared. Thank you for your nuggets of wisdom! Many blessings and good health to you.
  9. Phoenix94

    Clinicals Advice

    Thank you for the helpful tips! There are many things to learn, and sometimes, I don't know if I'm asking the right questions. One moment, I'm asking about medications and their purposes but when I turn in my report to my clinical instructor, they come up with questions like, "What makes this medication better than ____ or _____?" or " Would it be better for this patient to have scan A or scan B?" and I would have never thought of those questions. Do asking these more in-depth questions come from experience or is this kind of thinking expected from the get-go? Thank you in advance!
  10. Phoenix94

    Clinicals Advice

    Hello everyone! I'm starting clinicals in about 2 weeks. I have a general understanding of how clinicals work but how can I can use my time more wisely? I want to know what are the best things to do to get the most out the experience. Thank you in advance.
  11. Phoenix94

    ATI Program & Prices

    Hi! I'm also starting my second semester of school. For my MSN program, we use it for over half the time and the resources have been useful when it comes to the practical aspect of the program. However, I agree that ATI is overpriced as some of the material is available for free online or for a fractions of the price. (Prices vary based on which class requires their resources, but we're still talking around hundreds and closing to a thousand per semester.) From what I'm told, schools have students buy the program because NCLEX is run by ATI, and to optimize chances of passing, using ATI is a better bet. I'm sure there are budget-friendly options out there. However, schools, for whatever reason, don't talk about them. Good luck in your next semester!